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‘Symposia’ category

My new book, IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education, describes how academic libraries can enable the success of higher education students by creating or partnering with teaching and learning initiatives that support meaningful learning through engagement with information. Since the 1970s, the academic library community has been advocating and developing programming for information literacy. This book discusses existing models, extracting lessons from Purdue University Libraries’ partnership with other units to create a campus-wide course development program, Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation (IMPACT), which provides academic libraries with tools and strategies for working with faculty and departments to integrate information literacy into disciplinary courses.

First two chapters available in Google Books

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The Purdue Libraries is hosting the presentation “XENOPHILIA: How the love of difference is essential for information literacy” by Dr. Drew Whitworth.

 

Date: August 29, 2017

Time: 10:00am – 11:30am

Location: Purdue Memorial Union, West Faculty Lounge

 

The event is free and open to the public. Please click here to register.

 

Whitworth’s presentation will argue for an understanding of information literacy as a set of carefully constructed information practices that are informed by the contexts in which they play out. This vision of information literacy is rooted in xenophilia, a love and openness to difference. In this case, information literacy is defined by an awareness and openness to the variances that exist between different information landscapes and their practices. Whitworth will make the case for information literacy as a pedagogy that can enable important discussions of openness and dialog, particularly in today’s socio-political climate.  

 

Drew Whitworth is the Director of Teaching and Learning Strategy of the Manchester Institute of Education at The University of Manchester.

Rebecca Richardson and Vice Provost Frank Dooley with Award winners

Purdue Libraries gave out $50 awards for best poster abstracts in five categories to students at the Undergraduate Research and Poster Symposium held on Tuesday, April 11, 2017. The student winners of the awards were: Tianlong Sun, & NamAnh Nguyen (innovative technology/entrepreneurship/design), Manjie Fu (physical sciences), Helena Lysandrou (life sciences), Gayatri Mazgaonkar (social sciences/humanities), and Neal Patel (mathematical/computational sciences). Information Literacy Specialist, Clarence Maybee, coordinated the judging of the abstracts, which was conducted by several Libraries faculty, including Michael Flierl, Heather Howard, Sarah Huber, Nastasha Johnson, Hal Kirkwood, Judy Nixon, Margaret Phillips and Wei Zakharov. At the April 11th Symposium in the North and South Ballrooms of the Purdue Memorial Union, Rebecca Richardson, Assistant Dean for Collections and Access, announced the award winners.

On April 6th, Instruction Matter s: Purdue’s Academic Course Transformation (IMPACT) program hosted the 2017 IMPACT Symposium, featuring Purdue alumna and Kellogg W. Hunt Professor of English and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University, Dr. Kathleen Blake Yancey. The Symposium included two workshops on writing for learning. Dr. Yancey spoke about importance of incorporating writing into all academic disciplines, in order to support knowledge transfer to future academic and professional contexts. She also offered concrete examples and suggestions for Purdue faculty and instructors interested in adding writing assignments tailored to their courses and disciplines.

Before the morning session’s workshop on informal writing assignments, Dr. Yancey and the attendees asked questions of a panel five Purdue undergraduate students (Josey Cline and Lexi Eiler from Wildlife, Danny Zuercher from Landscape Architecture, Kenny Nguyen from Neurophysiology, and Sahej Bains from Biology). The students described their experiences with academic writing, including what motivates them to complete writing tasks, and what they believe is critical to help other students recognize the value of writing in their academic areas. In the afternoon session, participants designed writing assignments that feature the writing genres specific to their academic disciplines. Following the day’s workshops, attendees joined Dr. Yancey at the Gerald D. and Edna E. Mann Hall for a reception.

The Symposium was hosted by Purdue’s IMPACT program, a Big Moves initiative that helps instructors redesign their courses to be more student-centered. The planning committee was comprised of Dan Guberman (Chair) and Laura Fritz from the Center for Instructional Excellence, Clarence Maybee and Rachel Fundator from the Purdue Libraries, and Sheree Buikema from Instructional Technology at Purdue.