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The Purdue University Libraries’ “Looking Down, Looking Out, and Looking Up: Maps and the Human Experience” exhibition, on display now in the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center (fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Science and Education [HSSE] Library in Stewart Center), runs through June 23.

The Purdue University Libraries’ “Looking Down, Looking Out, and Looking Up: Maps and the Human Experience” exhibition, on display now in the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center (fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Science and Education [HSSE] Library in Stewart Center), runs through June 23.

Take the opportunity to explore the history, art, and science of maps and learn more about the people who created them and the individuals who use them at the Purdue University Libraries’ “Looking Down, Looking Out, and Looking Up: Maps and the Human Experience” exhibition through June 23. The exhibition is open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday and is free to the public.

Located in the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center (fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Science and Education [HSSE] Library in Stewart Center), the exhibit features maps, books, documents, and artifacts.

Featured in the exhibit are maps that progress from days of “looking down,” with traditional aerial maps; “looking out,” with the expansion of exploration and technology (such as railroads and canals); and “looking up,” with star charts, flight plans, and lunar maps.

Surveying tools, cloth maps used by a World War II pilot, and map pins used by Lillian Gilbreth, the first female engineering professor at Purdue University, are also included in the exhibit.

For more information, contact Adriana Harmeyer at 765-494-2263.

Transatlantic Flight Plan, 1928 Notated map by William Stultz in preparation of his 1928 transatlantic flight on which Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. Stultz charted multiple possible courses for both directions of the flight.

Transatlantic Flight Plan, 1928, is one of the maps in the “Looking Down, Looking Out, and Looking Up: Maps and the Human Experience” exhibition now on display in the Purdue University Libraries’ Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center. This notated map by Wilmer Stultz was in preparation for his 1928 transatlantic flight on which Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. Stultz charted multiple possible courses for both directions of the flight.