Purdue University Libraries Purdue Logo Purdue Libraries
 Hours  |   My Account  |   Ask a Librarian Get Help Give to the Libraries

‘Awards’ category

Courtesy of the American Library Association

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Dr. Clarence Maybee, Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

The Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) of the American Library Association has selected Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Clarence Maybee as the 2019 recipient of the LIRT Librarian Recognition Award. The Librarian Recognition Award was created to recognize an individual’s contribution to the development, advancement, and support of information literacy and instruction.

Since becoming a librarian in 2005, Maybee (who serves as a information literacy specialist at Purdue University) has made rich contributions to the profession through his strong publication and service record, as well as his exemplary record of program creation and dissemination.

His participation in the Purdue University IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation) program — a course-development program through which classroom instructors collaborate with librarians and others to improve their courses through active learning, information literacy, and other research-based educational practices — was particularly noteworthy. The program was named by The Chronicle of Higher Education as a 2018 Innovator, one of “six programs to change classroom culture.”

Closely aligned is his scholarship on informed learning design, which is intended to guide the creation of assignments so that students intentionally learn to use information sources at the same time that they are learning course content. In 2018, he authored the book “IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education.

Maybee has also demonstrated his commitment to the library instruction community through his leadership efforts in both the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Instruction Section and the Immersion Program. His contributions to the development, advancement, and support of information literacy and instruction exemplify the values that LIRT embraces.

“It is a tremendous honor to have received the LIRT Librarian Recognition Award. Throughout my career, I have looked to LIRT to inform my information literacy work as a librarian in higher education,” Maybee noted.

The Library Instruction Round Table was started in 1977 with the intent to bring together librarians who provide library instruction across all types of libraries — academic, public, school, and special libraries. This year marks the sixth year that the Librarian Recognition Award has been awarded.

Visit LIRT’s webpage at www.ala.org/rt/lirt/mission to find out more about LIRT, its mission, and the awards.

The LIRT Librarian Recognition Awards Subcommittee included Beth Fuchs of the University of Kentucky (chair & LIRT awards committee chair), Lore Guilmartin of the Pratt Institute, Yolanda Hood of the University of Prince Edward Island, and Melissa Ann Fraser-Arnott of the Library of Parliament, Canada. The ALA Office for Member Relations (AOMR) serves as the liaison to the Library and Instruction Round Table (LIRT).

Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor, and Michael Witt, associate professor, both in the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, accepted the Academic Connection Award for the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community from Associate Director of Residential Academic Initiatives Jonathan Manz.

Nastasha Johnson (left), assistant professor, and Michael Witt (center), associate professor, both in the Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, accepted the Academic Connection Award for the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community faculty team from Associate Director of Residential Academic Initiatives Jonathan Manz (right).

Faculty in the Purdue School of Engineering Education, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, and the Purdue Department of English engaged 53 engineering students in the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community in compelling outside-of-the-classroom activities to enhance student learning.

University Residences at Purdue University recently recognized outstanding faculty, staff, and resident assistants involved in learning communities for their exceptional work during the 2018-19 school year.

Faculty and staff who led the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community were honored with the Academic Connection Award, which recognizes the learning community that best connects courses to learning experiences outside of the classroom.

Kim Riddle (center, far end of table), director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, met with 10 students in the learning community for an Executive Boardroom Simulation.

Kim Riddle (center, far end of table), director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, meeting with the students who took part in the Executive Boardroom Simulation.

Instructors from the Purdue School of Engineering Education, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, and the Purdue Department of English organized a variety of active learning activities with the 53 engineering students in the learning community, including:

  • The application of data science to sports, which included popcorn and watching the movie “Moneyball,” and subsequently holding class in Mackey Arena with Matt Painter and Andrew McClatchey as guest lecturers.
  • Dawn or Doom: Students attended the conference, as well as a presentation about how to present data effectively (sponsored by the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies) by Jenny Lyons from Evergreen Data. Lyons also had lunch and talked with the engineering students about careers in data science.
Engineering students engaging in the Python with Pythons activity, during which they solved a programming challenge using the Python scripting language.

Engineering students engaging in the Python with Pythons activity, during which they solved a programming challenge using the Python scripting language.

  • Executive Boardroom Simulation: 10 students were selected to meet with Kim Riddle, director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, to role play lead engineers and board members presented with two problems to solve: scaling up production of Tide Pods and increasing and retaining women employees at the company.
  • Python with Pythons: The LC instructors partnered with Columbian Park Zoo to bring in snakes and their data (how much they eat and weigh) along with a programming challenge to solve using the Python scripting language.
  • Field trip to Cummins Technical Center: Students traveled to Cummins to tour the company’s research and development facility, experiment with virtual reality and the firm’s modeling and simulation environment, learn about careers for engineers in data science, and talk with experts on applications of machine and deep learning in industry.

Faculty on the instruction team for the learning community include:

  • Tamara Moore, co-lead, professor, School of Engineering Education
  • Michael Witt, co-lead, associate professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies
  • Sean Brophy, associate professor, School of Engineering Education
  • Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies
  • Bradley Dilger, associate professor, Department of English
  • Amanda Johnston, teaching assistant, School of Engineering Education
  • Ane Caroline Ribeiro Costa, teaching assistant, Department of English
  • Amanda Smith, teaching assistant, Department of English
  • Michelle McMullin, teaching assistant, Department of English

Learn more about the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community at www.purdue.edu/learningcommunities/profiles/engineering/engineering_data.html, and more about learning communities at Purdue at www.purdue.edu/learningcommunities/.

 

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena. Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena (Fall 2018). Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

Courtesy of Purdue Today

Purdue University recognized Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor Heather Howard’s contributions to student learning by honoring her with the Exceptional Early Career Award Tuesday, March 19. Howard was surprised with the news while she was teaching a class in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

(From left) Chantal Levesque-Bristol, executive director of the Center for Instructional Excellence; Ilana Stonebraker, associate professor, Libraries and School of Information Studies; Heather Howard, Exceptional Early Career Award recipient; Jason Behenna, Howard’s husband; Erla Heyns, associate professor, Libraries and School of Information Studies; Donna Ferullo, interim associate dean for academic affairs, Libraries and School of Information Studies; and Marcy Towns, professor of chemistry. (Purdue University photo/John Underwood)

The Exceptional Early Career Award recognizes outstanding undergraduate teaching among Purdue’s early career, tenure-track faculty. Recipients of the award will receive a $5,000 award with additional funds for a department business account.

Howard is among faculty in other departments being awarded this spring. For more information, visit the original piece in Purdue Today at www.purdue.edu/newsroom/purduetoday/releases/2019/Q1/howard,-harwood-honored-with-university-teaching-awards.html.

 

 

Seven individuals from Purdue University are being recognized (Monday, Oct. 22) for their contributions to open access with the Leadership in Open Access Award from Purdue University Libraries and the Office of the Provost.

This week (Oct. 22-28) academic institutions and libraries across the globe are celebrating the benefits of Open Access for research and scholarship during the 11th annual International Open Access Week commemoration.

Purdue Libraries 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award Winner Dean of Purdue Polytechnic Institute Gary Bertoline and Interim Dean of Libraries Rhonda Phillips

Purdue Libraries 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award Winner Dean of Purdue Polytechnic Institute Gary Bertoline (right) and Interim Dean of Purdue Libraries and Dean of the Purdue Honors College Rhonda Phillips

The individuals selected to receive the award this year include: Dean of the Purdue Polytechnic Institute Gary Bertoline; David Huckleberry, coordinator of digital instruction, Purdue Department of Physics and Astronomy; and five continuing lecturers with Purdue Department of Mathematics, including: Owen Davis, Huimei Delgado, David Norris, Patrick Devlin, and Timothy Delworth.

According to Scholarly Publishing Outreach Specialist Nina Collins, the individuals contributed to the following open access projects:

  • Dean Bertoline and Purdue Polytechnic Institute collaborated with Purdue e-Pubs to build a bridge between the content entered into Digital Measures (an online tool faculty use to organize, manage, and report on activities and CV data) and Purdue e-Pubs’ repository content. The new bridge enables faculty using Digital Measures to opt in easily in order to have citations for their publications harvested by Purdue e-Pubs staff. Once harvested, Purdue e-Pubs staff review publisher-sharing policies and work with faculty, providing free, mediated deposits to Purdue e-Pubs, Purdue University’s institutional repository (which provides free, global access to the scholarly outputs of Purdue University).
  • In 2014, Delworth and Delgado participated in a workshop by the Open Textbook Network sponsored by Purdue University Libraries. Delgado, Devlin, Norris, and Davis worked with Huckleberry and ITaP staff to launch LON-CAPA, an open-source learning content management system, to support the adoption of open education resources in mathematics courses. To date, the Purdue Department of Mathematics, in collaboration with ITaP, have provided LON-CAPA courseware for more than 25,000 students, saving these students the burden of purchasing expensive math textbooks.
Purdue Libraries Recognizes 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award Winners

Interim Dean of Purdue Libraries Rhonda Phillips with three of the Purdue Libraries’ 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award winners. Pictured, (L to R): Patrick Devlin, Rhonda Phillips, Dave Huckleberry, and Huimei Delgado. (Not pictured: Owen Davis, David Norris, and Timothy Delworth.)

According to Interim Dean of Libraries Rhonda Phillips, the individuals were selected to receive the recognition this year for leading by example in the Open Access movement at Purdue University.

“These individuals have demonstrated leadership in Open Access to scholarly resources, and they truly exemplify what it means to ‘design equitable foundations for open knowledge,’ the theme of International Open Access Week 2018,” Phillips said. “I am pleased to present the 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award to each of them, in recognition of their outstanding leadership in this area, as well as of their continued commitment to increase visibility of scholarship at Purdue in partnership with Purdue e-Pubs.”

Since 2012, Purdue e-Pubs has more than 17 million downloads from users all over the world, with the average download rate of more than two million downloads per year.

For more information about Open Access at Purdue, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess. Learn more about Purdue e-Pubs at http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/.

Two Purdue University faculty members have been named recipients of the 2017-18 Library Scholars Grant, which supports each grant recipient’s access to unique collections of information around the country and the world.

Charlene Elsby, 2017-18 Library Scholars Grant Program Recipient (Purdue University Libraries)

IPFW Assistant Professor of Philosophy Charlene Elsby

Indiana (University) Purdue (University) Fort Wayne (IPFW) Assistant Professor of Philosophy Charlene Elsby was awarded $5,000 to travel to the Husserl Archives at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium) to continue her research about the roots of phenomenology. Purdue University Libraries Assistant Professor Kendall Roark was awarded $5,000 to conduct archival research within organizational and community collections housed in the Arizona Queer Archives (University of Arizona).

Established in 1985 by the 50th anniversary gift of members of the Class of 1935, the Library Scholars Grant Program is available for non-tenured and recently tenured Purdue faculty in all disciplines from the West Lafayette, Fort Wayne, IUPUI, and Northwest campuses, as well as those in the Statewide Technology Program.

The archival research that both Elsby and Roark will undertake will be used for an individual book, a monograph, and/or a project based on their research.

According to Elsby, whose research project is titled, “Time-Consciousness and Transcendental Idealism,” the 2017-18 grant award will enable her to access the Husserl Archives, where she has previously conducted research supported by the Library Scholars Grant Program.

“When I left the archives in 2016, I was halfway through translating Husserl’s essay on Berkeleyan idealism, ‘Esse und Percipi,’ a work which I hope to continue, with the ultimate goal of producing an examination of the relevant differences between Husserlian and Berkeleyan idealism,” noted Elsby, who is also the interim director of the philosophy program in the IPFW Department of English and Linguistics.

Kendall Roark, 2017-18 Library Scholars Grant Program Recipient (Purdue University Libraries)

Purdue University Libraries Assistant Professor Kendall Roark

Roark noted that materials from the Arizona Queer Archives, “which engages the local community in the development of its collections and prioritizes the everyday lives of LGBTQ Arizonans,” will be used to complete a final chapter of a book manuscript, tentatively titled “Oasis: Imaginative Geographies and the Marginal Locations of Queer,” as well as an online exhibit related to the history of LGBTQ activism and civic engagements along the U.S. and Mexico border.

“‘Oasis’ draws on my past ethnographic multi-modal fieldwork and archival research on hate crime memorials and anti-gay ballot initiative campaigns in Southern Arizona,” Roark explained. “The book will complement recent ethnographic work and intersectional and transnational borderlands research such as, ‘Queer Migration Politics’ by Karma Chavez (2013) and contributions to the history of sexuality such as ‘Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence’ by Christina Hanhardt (2013). Through this work, I seek to contribute to discussions around participatory/collaborative research, as well as material and political implications of movement, ethnographic, and archival memory practices.”

The grant program, which the Class of 1935 has supported continuously over the last 33 years, covers the recipients’ expenses associated with the cost of transportation, lodging, meals, and fees charged by the library or other collection owner.

For more information about the program, and to see the past recipients of the Library Scholars Grant Program, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/scholars/past_recipients.

Yvonne Pitts, Associate Professor

Yvonne Pitts, assistant professor of history, was awarded $3,380.00 by the Purdue Library Scholars Grant Program to conduct research for her article, “’Vile Characters’ and Property Law: Regulating Prostitution and Creating Property in Civil War Era Nashville, 1860-1868,” which examines the short-lived system of regulated prostitution during wartime in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Library Scholars grant is awarded to untenured and associate professors tenured after July 1, 2015, to support research-related travel expenses to archives and collections outside of Purdue. For guideline and submission instructions to the Library Scholars Grant Program — now accepting applications no later than 5 p.m., Friday, November 10 — visit www.lib.purdue.edu/scholars/guidelines.

In her answers below, Dr. Pitts shared a bit about her travel to two different archives for her research, which the Library Scholars Grant Program supported.

Q: Yvonne, what is the focus of the research you conducted with the Library Scholars Grant Program?

A: My project examines crime and vice regulation and the system of regulated prostitution imposed by Union military authorities in occupied Nashville during the American Civil War. I am concerned with the exercise of legal authority on the ground in Nashville, which after occupied by the forces of General Ulysses S. Grant, had several competing law enforcement forces. My work at the two archives I visited reveal a complex, often haphazard system of multiple law enforcement actors that evolved in response to military demands, civilian hostility, and the threat of public disorder. During this period, soldiers often became the object of scrutiny for law enforcement agents while prostitutes, while subject to licensing and inspection, gained greater zones of legal autonomy.

Q: When did you travel to the unique collection/archives and what did you find there?

A: I traveled to two archives. The first, the Nashville Public Library holds the local civilian court and government records, including case files and the Aldermen’s minutes. The National Archives and Records Administration in Washington D.C. holds the federal government records which includes the Army records, the Provost Marshal (military’s law enforcement force), and Surgeon General’s reports. Access to these records, which are rarely digitized or even indexed in any detail is essential to my project.

Q: How did this grant enable you to complete or add to your research?

A: The Library Scholars Grant allowed me to study important local law enforcement records. After these trips, I have been able to write grants for more research funding, develop a plan of research for a book manuscript, and write an article draft.

Q: What are some highlights and memories from your travels?

A: One highlight was finding the Jail Record books in the National Archives. As I discovered at the Nashville Public Library, many of the criminal case files from Nashville had been destroyed, so I was not able to read transcripts and judgments from local civil arrests by the Nashville Police. At the National Archives, I discovered the U.S. Army Provost Martial’s Jail Record Books. These books contained information about charges, prisoners, sentences, and locations of arrests. They are a wealth of information. On another note, after I left the Nashville Public Library at closing, I had some of the best barbeque of my life in Nashville.

Q: What tips would you give to scholars applying for this grant?

A: Be specific about the collections you hope to access. I called and emailed with archivists from both locations for about two weeks before I finished the application. I included their names and the specific collections, sometimes to the volume or folder level, that I planned to access. I sought to convince the Library Scholars Grant Committee that I would hit the ground running on my first day.