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Bethany McGowan, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Bethany McGowan

Recently, two members of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty were selected to receive a Research Data Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). The $20,000 grant award for the project, “Understanding Rates of Attrition in Biomedical Data Challenges: A Study of Failure,” will enable Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor Bethany McGowan and Associate Professor Ilana Stonebraker to provide research data management training to students.

The award will facilitate a variety of training workshops including: FAIR Data Principles; Research Data Management Basics: Finding and Organizing Data; Cleaning and Formatting Data with OpenRefine; General Tips for Visualizing Biomedical Data; Biomedical Data Visualization with Tableau; and Useful R Packages for Analyzing and Visualizing Biomedical Data. The grant period began May 1 and will conclude April 30, 2020.

The workshops are part of a larger research project through which McGowan and Stonebraker will conduct a study to understand rates of attrition in biomedical data challenges.

Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Ilana Stonebraker

“Our study will examine student motivation for participation in extracurricular innovation challenges, such as hackathons and case competitions, which involve the use of biomedical data, in an attempt to understand failure and reduce rates of attrition in these events,” said McGowan, who is the project lead.

In addition to presenting results of their research at conferences throughout the year, McGowan and Stonebraker will develop a digital open-education resource toolkit to help guide librarians in recruiting for and retaining diverse student populations in data-hacking challenges.

According to the NNLM’s Greater Midwest Region (GMR) website, the project supports Goal 3 of the National Library of Medicine’s Strategic Plan, which is to build a workforce for data-driven research and health.

“It supports the aligning objectives to expand and enhance research training for biomedical informatics and data science, to assure data science and open science proficiency, to increase workforce diversity, and to engage the next generation and promote data literacy,” states the NNLM GMR website.

Head of the Purdue Archives and Special Collections and Professor Sammie Morris (front row, far right) with her graduate students who compiled the "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" online exhibit. Students are (back row, L to R): Narim Kim, Erika Gotfredson, Lee Hibbard, Arielle McKee, and E. C. McGregor Boyle III; (front row, L to R): Maddie Gehling, Elise Robbins, and Dee McCormick.

Head of the Purdue Archives and Special Collections and Professor Sammie Morris (front row, far right) with her graduate students who compiled the “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives” online exhibit. Students are (back row, L to R): Narim Kim, Erika Gotfredson, Lee Hibbard, Arielle McKee, and E. C. McGregor Boyle III; (front row, L to R): Maddie Gehling, Elise Robbins, and Dee McCormick.

Every story has untold pieces. Purdue University Archives and Special Collections contains millions of stories in the many papers, books, objects, items, and other memorabilia carefully preserved and stored there. Yet, it does not hold them all—particularly those that may have not been “judged to be…important,” as noted in the introduction of the new online exhibit, “Voices, Identities & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in Purdue Archives.”

The exhibit is the result of a graduate course led by Purdue University Archivist and Professor Sammie Morris this past spring semester.

The exhibit’s introduction notes that Purdue’s past, present, and future are comprised of much more than stories about feats associated with its engineering programs, its tales about athletic teams, or its strides in agricultural research and practice. It also explains why the student curators took on this effort:

[N]ot all of this history is (or will be) preserved in the University’s archive. Inevitably, some people and events are judged to be more important and thus more worthy of preservation. Our exhibit, then, aims to focus attention on elements of Purdue’s history that have been otherwise overlooked, not in order to ‘correct’ that history but rather to expand it and (if our aim is true) change our understanding of what ‘counts’ as that history in the first place. — Voices, Identities & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in Purdue Archives

According to Morris, the idea for the course coincided with Purdue University’s faculty and staff members’ preparation for Purdue’s Sesquicentennial.

“As Purdue’s 150th anniversary approached, I often found myself reflecting on how the history of Purdue is preserved in the Archives, but not completely. There are many hidden gaps or silences representing people in Purdue history whose stories have not been widely known,” Morris said. “I began thinking about ways to fill in gaps in Purdue history, while engaging students in learning archival research skills.”

Erika Gotfredson shares her thoughts about the work she did for the "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" online exhibit. Gotfredson researched and composed "Title IX in the 1970s," and in her research she found a Sept. 4, 1974, article in The Exponent that "the newly formed women’s intercollegiate athletics program had released a female 'insignia,' or mascot, intended to represent the emerging female athletes," Gotfredson explains in the exhibit. "Criticism of Polly Purdue emerged a single day after her drawing appeared in the Exponent. On September 5th, the Exponent staff published this piece entitled 'Polly Purdue must go, insult to women' in the 'Opinion/Viewpoint' section of the paper." Read more at http://1350-omeka.cla.purdue.edu/s/investigating-150-years/page/title-ix-in-1970s

During a private reception highlighting the online exhibit project, Erika Gotfredson shared her thoughts about the work she did for the “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives.” Gotfredson researched and composed “Title IX in the 1970s,” and, in her research, she found a Sept. 4, 1974, article in The Exponent that shared news about how “the newly formed women’s intercollegiate athletics program had released a female ‘insignia,’ or mascot, intended to represent the emerging female athletes,” Gotfredson explains in the exhibit. “Criticism of Polly Purdue emerged a single day after her drawing appeared in the Exponent. On September 5th, the Exponent staff published this piece entitled ‘Polly Purdue must go, insult to women’ in the ‘Opinion/Viewpoint’ section of the paper.” Read more in her part of the exhibit at http://1350-omeka.cla.purdue.edu/s/investigating-150-years/page/title-ix-in-1970s.

The course, too, coincided with Purdue Libraries’ expansion of its teaching mission through the creation of the new “Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies.”

“With digital humanities being one area the new school focuses on, the course offered the right opportunity to teach digital scholarship methods while providing students the opportunity to delve into Purdue’s lesser-known history,” Morris explained. “The overarching goal for students was to learn how to conduct archival research, but the broader goal was to benefit from the results of their research projects by highlighting diversity in Purdue’s past. Students in the course were encouraged to consider the identity of Purdue and how their experiences as students today are preserved. Students learned how the records of their experiences (that are preserved in the Archives) become sources of study for scholars in the future.”

Lee Hibbard, a third-year Ph.D. student in the Purdue Department of English studying rhetoric and composition, said the title of the exhibit came about as the students "played with the theme of the course and our process of research, as well as what we wanted viewers to take away from the exhibit."

Lee Hibbard, a third-year Ph.D. student in the Purdue Department of English studying rhetoric and composition, said the title of the exhibit came about as the students “played with the theme of the course and our process of research, as well as what we wanted viewers to take away from the exhibit.”

Students in Morris’ class each focused on an individual era and/or topic in Purdue’s history, and the contents covered in the online exhibit are the result of each student’s work. For instance, Lee Hibbard, a third-year Ph.D. student in the Purdue Department of English studying rhetoric and composition, focused on queer life in the 2000s at Purdue.

“The work on the exhibit was entirely collaborative, with every person taking on distinct roles both on the front and back end of the exhibit’s appearance and contents,” Hibbard explained. “To come up with the title, we took a portion of class time and brainstormed some ideas together. The title came about as we played with the theme of the course and our process of research, as well as what we wanted viewers to take away from the exhibit. The wording was especially important to us as Purdue students wanting to tell a coherent narrative that depicted our goals for the exhibit, as well as the things we took away from the course as a whole,” he added.

“The three core pieces of archival work we focused on—voices, identities, and silences—became the first part of the title. The second half emphasized our process, which was very much a journey of going through the archives with an eye towards investigating diversity, rather than discovering,” Hibbard continued. “Discovery has an end point while Investigation is a process, and even though we all uncovered many interesting and fascinating examples of diversity, all of us felt by the end of the course that we had just scratched the surface of our areas, and could easily return to them to try and learn more.”

Hibbard, who is also interested in archival practices, noted that he found this course essential to unpacking the complex ideas he had for his dissertation.

“At the beginning of the semester, I knew I wanted to look at some archival things, but didn’t have the tools to do so. After a spring of reading complex theory, getting hands-on archival experience, and learning the importance of selection and curation in an exhibit setting, I feel more comfortable with the prospect of working with archives for my dissertation and my future scholarship as a whole,” he said.

Like his fellow students in the course, Hibbard chose to home in on a specific area of Purdue’s history because of his personal stake and interest in the selected topic and era.

“As a queer person, specifically a transgender man, I am very interested in the way support and networks for queer students developed at Purdue during the time that I was an undergraduate (2006-2010) at a similar large Midwestern university (University of Nebraska in Lincoln),” he explained.

Shortly before the end of the Spring 2019 semester, students in Morris’ course shared their personal stories about their work on the exhibit at a small, private reception held in the Archives and Special Collections. Below are more photos from that reception.

 

Dee McCormick, E. C. McGregor Boyle III, and Elise Robbins, listen to Narim Kim as she discussed her work on the "Foreign Teaching Assistants in the 1980s" part of the "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" online exhibit.

L to R: Dee McCormick, E. C. McGregor Boyle III, and Elise Robbins listen to Narim Kim (far right) as she discussed her work on the “Foreign Teaching Assistants in the 1980s” part of the “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives” online exhibit.

Maddie Gehling's part of "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" focused on "Women’s Leadership in the 1890s." In her archival research, Gehling found that Agnes Eugenie Vater served as the very first editor-in-chief of The Purdue Exponent "(the university’s student newspaper), the first edition of which was printed in December 1889."

Maddie Gehling’s part of “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives” focused on “Women’s Leadership in the 1890s.” In her archival research, Gehling found that Agnes Eugenie Vater served as the very first editor-in-chief of The Purdue Exponent “(the university’s student newspaper), the first edition of which was printed in December 1889.” Vater was the only who woman who served on the board of editors for the 1891 edition of the Debris, Purdue University’s now-defunct yearbook. Read more at http://1350-omeka.cla.purdue.edu/s/investigating-150-years/page/womens-leadership-in-1890s.

Citation Graph from CADRE

Citation Graph from CADRE

Faculty in the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies are helping to build the Collaborative Archive & Data Research Environment (CADRE) with Indiana University, the Big Ten Academic Alliance, Microsoft Research, Web of Science, and the National Science Foundation’s regional big data innovation hubs to provide sustainable and standardized data and text mining capabilities for open and licensed big data. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funded the two-year project with a National Leadership Grant in September 2018.

According to Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Michael Witt—who is among the faculty working on the grant project—the first two datasets being provisioned on the CADRE platform are the bibliographic data from the Web of Science and Microsoft Academic Search. With more than 280 million combined citations, these resources provide a vast and rich dataset for informetric and scientometric research.

To better understand the needs of potential users and applications for research, CADRE is inviting fellowship applications from interested researchers. Once the fellows are selected, they will have early access to the platform. Witt noted that CADRE fellows will:

  • gain access to the latest bibliometric datasets, including Web of Science and Microsoft Academic Graph;
  • receive data and technical support for your project, including training webinars on CADRE tools and data sets;
  • join the CADRE community with other fellows, and share your ideas and feedback with the CADRE team on Slack channels and in GitHub repositories;
  • have early access to free cloud computing resources as we update and test different components of the CADRE platform; and
  • receive travel scholarships to present your work at prominent venues.

Six full scholarships are now available for the upcoming International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics at Sapienza University in Rome, to be held Sept. 2-5, 2019.

Interested faculty and graduate students from Purdue should apply via the CADRE website at http://iuni.iu.edu/resources/cadre/fellowship-program by May 31.

For information about CADRE, visit http://iuni.iu.edu/resources/cadre.

Courtesy of the American Library Association

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Dr. Clarence Maybee, Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

The Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) of the American Library Association has selected Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Clarence Maybee as the 2019 recipient of the LIRT Librarian Recognition Award. The Librarian Recognition Award was created to recognize an individual’s contribution to the development, advancement, and support of information literacy and instruction.

Since becoming a librarian in 2005, Maybee (who serves as a information literacy specialist at Purdue University) has made rich contributions to the profession through his strong publication and service record, as well as his exemplary record of program creation and dissemination.

His participation in the Purdue University IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation) program — a course-development program through which classroom instructors collaborate with librarians and others to improve their courses through active learning, information literacy, and other research-based educational practices — was particularly noteworthy. The program was named by The Chronicle of Higher Education as a 2018 Innovator, one of “six programs to change classroom culture.”

Closely aligned is his scholarship on informed learning design, which is intended to guide the creation of assignments so that students intentionally learn to use information sources at the same time that they are learning course content. In 2018, he authored the book “IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education.

Maybee has also demonstrated his commitment to the library instruction community through his leadership efforts in both the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Instruction Section and the Immersion Program. His contributions to the development, advancement, and support of information literacy and instruction exemplify the values that LIRT embraces.

“It is a tremendous honor to have received the LIRT Librarian Recognition Award. Throughout my career, I have looked to LIRT to inform my information literacy work as a librarian in higher education,” Maybee noted.

The Library Instruction Round Table was started in 1977 with the intent to bring together librarians who provide library instruction across all types of libraries — academic, public, school, and special libraries. This year marks the sixth year that the Librarian Recognition Award has been awarded.

Visit LIRT’s webpage at www.ala.org/rt/lirt/mission to find out more about LIRT, its mission, and the awards.

The LIRT Librarian Recognition Awards Subcommittee included Beth Fuchs of the University of Kentucky (chair & LIRT awards committee chair), Lore Guilmartin of the Pratt Institute, Yolanda Hood of the University of Prince Edward Island, and Melissa Ann Fraser-Arnott of the Library of Parliament, Canada. The ALA Office for Member Relations (AOMR) serves as the liaison to the Library and Instruction Round Table (LIRT).

Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor, and Michael Witt, associate professor, both in the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, accepted the Academic Connection Award for the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community from Associate Director of Residential Academic Initiatives Jonathan Manz.

Nastasha Johnson (left), assistant professor, and Michael Witt (center), associate professor, both in the Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, accepted the Academic Connection Award for the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community faculty team from Associate Director of Residential Academic Initiatives Jonathan Manz (right).

Faculty in the Purdue School of Engineering Education, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, and the Purdue Department of English engaged 53 engineering students in the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community in compelling outside-of-the-classroom activities to enhance student learning.

University Residences at Purdue University recently recognized outstanding faculty, staff, and resident assistants involved in learning communities for their exceptional work during the 2018-19 school year.

Faculty and staff who led the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community were honored with the Academic Connection Award, which recognizes the learning community that best connects courses to learning experiences outside of the classroom.

Kim Riddle (center, far end of table), director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, met with 10 students in the learning community for an Executive Boardroom Simulation.

Kim Riddle (center, far end of table), director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, meeting with the students who took part in the Executive Boardroom Simulation.

Instructors from the Purdue School of Engineering Education, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, and the Purdue Department of English organized a variety of active learning activities with the 53 engineering students in the learning community, including:

  • The application of data science to sports, which included popcorn and watching the movie “Moneyball,” and subsequently holding class in Mackey Arena with Matt Painter and Andrew McClatchey as guest lecturers.
  • Dawn or Doom: Students attended the conference, as well as a presentation about how to present data effectively (sponsored by the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies) by Jenny Lyons from Evergreen Data. Lyons also had lunch and talked with the engineering students about careers in data science.
Engineering students engaging in the Python with Pythons activity, during which they solved a programming challenge using the Python scripting language.

Engineering students engaging in the Python with Pythons activity, during which they solved a programming challenge using the Python scripting language.

  • Executive Boardroom Simulation: 10 students were selected to meet with Kim Riddle, director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, to role play lead engineers and board members presented with two problems to solve: scaling up production of Tide Pods and increasing and retaining women employees at the company.
  • Python with Pythons: The LC instructors partnered with Columbian Park Zoo to bring in snakes and their data (how much they eat and weigh) along with a programming challenge to solve using the Python scripting language.
  • Field trip to Cummins Technical Center: Students traveled to Cummins to tour the company’s research and development facility, experiment with virtual reality and the firm’s modeling and simulation environment, learn about careers for engineers in data science, and talk with experts on applications of machine and deep learning in industry.

Faculty on the instruction team for the learning community include:

  • Tamara Moore, co-lead, professor, School of Engineering Education
  • Michael Witt, co-lead, associate professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies
  • Sean Brophy, associate professor, School of Engineering Education
  • Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies
  • Bradley Dilger, associate professor, Department of English
  • Amanda Johnston, teaching assistant, School of Engineering Education
  • Ane Caroline Ribeiro Costa, teaching assistant, Department of English
  • Amanda Smith, teaching assistant, Department of English
  • Michelle McMullin, teaching assistant, Department of English

Learn more about the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community at www.purdue.edu/learningcommunities/profiles/engineering/engineering_data.html, and more about learning communities at Purdue at www.purdue.edu/learningcommunities/.

 

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena. Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena (Fall 2018). Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

Giant Leaps Symposium on Electronic Theses and DissertationsOn May 23, the Purdue University Graduate School and Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies are hosting an invitation-only symposium on the topic of non-traditional theses and dissertations. (A limited number of invitations are available. Visit www.lib.purdue.edu/etdgiantleaps to request an invitation.)

As universities and colleges have moved from print to digital, electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) present the opportunity to think beyond the limitations of traditional formats and processes in order to enable students to express their scholarship with greater creativity and impact.

This one-day symposium will feature keynote addresses by University of North Carolina (UNC) Greensboro Dean of Libraries and Professor Martin Halbert and Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Professor Jean-Pierre Hérubel. Sessions will explore the challenges and opportunities of ETDs by bringing together faculty and staff directly engaged in supervising theses and dissertations and managing the processes and infrastructure for producing them.

There is no cost to attend, and lunch will be provided. For more information, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/etdgiantleaps.

Courtesy of Purdue News Service

Purdue Libraries and School of Information StudiesA former associate dean and professor at Purdue University will be returning to campus after being selected the new dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies.

Beth McNeil, dean of library services and professor at Iowa State University, will join Purdue on July 1.

“Beth’s knowledge of the Purdue Libraries organization and our entire campus will be an enormous benefit as we continue to develop an integrated, campus-wide data science education ecosystem,” said Jay Akridge, provost and vice president for academic affairs and diversity. “Beth brings an impressive record of leadership excellence in library and information science to this important position.”

Previously, McNeil was Purdue’s associate dean for academic affairs and a professor of Purdue Libraries. Before her initial appointment at Purdue, McNeil was assistant, and then associate, dean of libraries for the University of Nebraska. She also has held positions in the libraries at Bradley University and the University of Illinois.

McNeil graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a bachelor’s degree in English, and her master’s in library from information studies. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Nebraska.

McNeil’s research has been published in numerous academic journals and has focused on areas such as librarians and scholarly communication, changes in libraries in the 21st century and performance management and career development.

“I look forward to working with my colleagues at Purdue as we collaborate to create innovative ways to further the work of our faculty, staff and students,” McNeil said. “Purdue is well-positioned to address the rapid development of data science and to lead the way in integrating information literacy into the curriculum.”

McNeil was one of four finalists for this position. In her role at Purdue, McNeil will lead faculty and staff focused on expanding teaching and learning in data and information literacy, digital scholarship, and undergraduate and graduate research. These efforts will be in conjunction with a University-wide Integrated Data Science Initiative in collaboration with all academic colleges.

By Abbey Nickel, see https://bit.ly/2HKKyq0

Courtesy of Purdue Today

Purdue University recognized Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor Heather Howard’s contributions to student learning by honoring her with the Exceptional Early Career Award Tuesday, March 19. Howard was surprised with the news while she was teaching a class in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

(From left) Chantal Levesque-Bristol, executive director of the Center for Instructional Excellence; Ilana Stonebraker, associate professor, Libraries and School of Information Studies; Heather Howard, Exceptional Early Career Award recipient; Jason Behenna, Howard’s husband; Erla Heyns, associate professor, Libraries and School of Information Studies; Donna Ferullo, interim associate dean for academic affairs, Libraries and School of Information Studies; and Marcy Towns, professor of chemistry. (Purdue University photo/John Underwood)

The Exceptional Early Career Award recognizes outstanding undergraduate teaching among Purdue’s early career, tenure-track faculty. Recipients of the award will receive a $5,000 award with additional funds for a department business account.

Howard is among faculty in other departments being awarded this spring. For more information, visit the original piece in Purdue Today at www.purdue.edu/newsroom/purduetoday/releases/2019/Q1/howard,-harwood-honored-with-university-teaching-awards.html.

 

 

Visiting Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the University of the Pacific Elham (Ellie) Sayyad Abdi

(Ellie) Sayyad Abdi

Visiting Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the University of the Pacific Elham (Ellie) Sayyad Abdi will present “Immigrants: An Information Literacy Framework” at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 23 in Stewart Center, room 320, during her visit to Purdue University. The talk is open free to the public and is sponsored by the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies.

Abdi’s research focuses on uncovering the ways in which different populations conceptualize and engage with information. Her presentation will cover her Australian Research Council-funded study, which explores immigrants’ experiences with information and information literacy to enable them to learn the structure of the new environment, make informed choices, and become active and empowered participants of a new society.

Currently, Abdi is the Australian Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the University of the Pacific, California. She is an information researcher and working to pioneer the concept of information experience design (IXD), which is about designing and developing interventions for everyday life based on how people engage with information. Her research specifically examines the information experience among immigrant communities.

From 2014–18, Abdi served as an assistant professor in the School of Information Systems at Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

Abdi is a member of the Research Advisory Committee of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), chairs the LIS Education in Developing Countries Special Interest Group at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), regularly serves as a reviewer for various information journals, and serves on the program committees of various information conferences.

For more information about this event, contact Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Clarence Maybee at cmaybee@purdue.edu.

Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

The Marshall and Susan Larsen Leaders Academy in the Krannert School of Management provides an ideal place for Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Ilana Stonebraker to teach Purdue students.

The Academy, according to its website, “provides high-achieving students with enhanced academic opportunities and learning experiences to help them become top performers in the world of business.” The program creates “a culture of achievement”—a phenomenon that Stonebraker, as an instructor of the Management 110 course offered to students in the Academy, not only fosters and sustains in her teaching, but also one she takes to heart in the pursuit of top performance in her own chosen field.

In Fall 2018, Stonebraker was among 12 faculty members inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy as a new Teaching Academy Fellow. She is the first ever Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty member to be inducted into the elite program, which recognizes Purdue faculty for their outstanding and scholarly teaching in graduate, undergraduate, or engagement programs. This recognition is just one among many honors Stonebraker has racked up over the last couple of years. In June 2018, she was one of 10 individuals selected by the Tippy Connect Young Professionals (TCYP) in the organization’s annual Top 10 Young Professionals Under 40 Award program. Last summer, she was recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) Library Instruction Roundtable as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. (She was recognized for the same thing in 2016 for a different article.) In early 2017, she was named a “Mover & Shaker” in Library Journal’s annual roundup that honors individuals making significant impacts in libraries and in education around the world. Last fall, too, she was elected to the Tippecanoe County Council (representing District 1).

While the accolades are rewarding, she noted, it is her work—like teaching the highly motivated students in the Larsen Leaders Academy—that really inspires her.

“I like to figure out where students are and help them build bridges to achieve their dreams, to help them imagine and then try things they never would have imagined themselves doing before,” she explained. “One of the ways I do this is through encouraging them to explore the ways they use information in their decision-making processes.”

Stonebraker has been at Purdue since 2012, and she has been teaching in Krannert since 2013. In addition to her teaching course load, she serves as one of Purdue Libraries’ business information specialists in the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics. She also researches how individuals use information in their studies and in their work and applies the knowledge she gains from that in her teaching.

“That is how I introduce myself to my students. I tell them, ‘I teach information literacy, and I research how people use information. Based on that, I can teach you skills that others cannot teach you here at Purdue,'” she explained. “Knowing how to use and apply information is increasingly important in a 21st-century economy. People in business, particularly, need to know how to use and apply information quickly. That is basically data analytics.”

Stonebraker is among several Libraries faculty who either teach or co-teach credit courses at Purdue in a variety of departments. She proudly points out that librarians tend to be highly engaged instructors who have been developing and practicing effective active-learning techniques and approaches to instruction for many years (perhaps even before “active learning” became an important practice in education).

“Librarians make interesting teachers because we think systematically about problems. Our brains are set up for inputs and outputs,” she added. “Our default is active learning. You can’t really teach students how to research and use information without actively engaging students in research and information use activities.”