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‘Inform Purdue’ category

On Tuesday (Nov. 14), Purdue University Libraries recognized the research contributions of Libraries faculty members during its annual “Celebrating Research” event. During the celebration, one of the presenters, Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist Clarence Maybee, talked about his new book, “IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education,” which will be available in March 2018.

The book covers how librarians in academic libraries can help enable the success of college students “by creating or partnering with teaching and learning initiatives that support meaningful learning through engagement with information,” states the book’s description on the publisher’s website.

“Since the 1970s, the academic library community has been advocating and developing programming for information literacy. This book discusses existing models, extracting lessons from Purdue University Libraries’ partnership with other units to create a campus-wide course development program, Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation (IMPACT), which provides academic libraries with tools and strategies for working with faculty and departments to integrate information literacy into disciplinary courses,” the description continues.

At Purdue, Dr. Maybee is among the group of faculty members in the libraries and in other academic areas demonstrating the importance of information literacy not only for college students, but also for new graduates and mid-career and long-time professionals–indeed, for everyone.

To create awareness about this importance Maybee, Libraries Information Literacy Instructional Designer Rachel Fundator, with the help of Julia Smith, graduate assistant, and Teresa Koltzenburg, strategic communication director, implemented “Inform Purdue,” a social media campaign to “celebrate information literacy at Purdue. The campaign features interviews with Purdue students, alumni, and faculty in a series of videos and social media posts.

“Purdue Libraries’ approach to information literacy is to teach students to use information in the context of learning about something—much as they will do on the job, or to make personal decisions after graduation,” Maybee explained. “In the ‘Inform Purdue’ campaign, Purdue students, faculty, former faculty, and staff share their own ‘stories’ of teaching and learning about information literacy, and how it helps them to accomplish their educational and professional goals.”

The campaign concludes today with a final video featuring Dr. Maybee (see above).

You can catch more of the videos online at www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfiLH31ZZsO3vwygf_oblFiyZfqZzWV1k or via the Libraries’ news and announcements website at http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/category/inform-purdue/.

An assignment to find research about a particular drug ultimately changed the way Cameron Pate–a 2017 Purdue University pharmaceutical sciences graduate–searched for information during his studies at Purdue.

Pate, who recently started a new job with the Dow Chemical Company in Indianapolis, said, for this particular assignment, when he had exhausted Google, he headed to Purdue Libraries.

“Thankfully, personnel at Purdue Libraries showed me the access I had to vast electronic resources, including several well-respected research article databases, because of my Purdue student status. This fundamentally changed how I would search for information the rest of my college career and helped me tremendously,” he noted.

Pate also learned to apply his information literacy skills to other aspects of his college career, including how to get the most of out a job search. As part of the Inform Purdue Information Literacy campaign, Pate talks about how he used information to maximize his job search in the video below.

To see more from Inform Purdue, visit http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/category/inform-purdue/.

Kenny Nguyen (Hilliard, OH), a Purdue University senior majoring in neurobiology and physiology, knows something about applying classroom learning to real-life research work.

“Taking joint lecture-lab science courses not only taught me about the life cycle of cells, but also how to raise them in a real research environment,” he noted.

In 2015, Nguyen experienced a “real” research environment, when he was selected as a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship intern and received the William H. Phillips Undergraduate Research Grant from the Purdue Department of Biological Sciences. In addition, he completed an internship at the National Institutes of Health.

In the Fall 2016 edition of JPUR (Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research), Nguyen published “Degeneration of Neuronal Mitochondria in Parkinson’s Disease” (p. 41), the result of his studies examining “the degeneration of mitochondria in neurons and the implications in Parkinson’s disease.”

The information literacy skills Nguyen — who plans to pursue an M.D. or a Ph.D. in the medical field — has developed in his coursework at Purdue has led to his successful research, publishing, and internship endeavors outside of the classroom.

In his answers below, Nguyen talks about the ways he has learned to use information in his undergraduate studies at Purdue, as well as why it will be important for him to continue to develop his information literacy skills throughout his career in the medical field.

Q. What ways are you learning to use information at Purdue that will be useful for your future professional (or personal ) endeavors?

Through Purdue, I am learning how to apply the information I have learned in the classroom into real-life work directly, such as research or in medical centers. These skills will be vital to me in my future career in the medical field, in which physicians are expected to be updated continually on the progress of medical technology, news, and research. I will be expected to understand these findings and apply them directly to my work. I believe that my time at Purdue has strongly prepared me for my future profession.

Q. Describe a time when you learned to use information in a new way to help you accomplish something.

I used to be the managing editor for the “Purdue Review, Inc.,” the premier campus news magazine. In 2015, we decided to venture onto the online platform to provide news for students in a more easily accessible, convenient manner. None of the members in our organization had knowledge on developing a website, so we used the information and resources available to us for our advantage.

The design team had to learn to design not only magazine spreads, but also online pages, and the writers had to learn how to write articles in a succinct, eye-catching manner that is more suitable for online. And I learned how to upload news articles online and manage the operations of the website.

I had knowledge on how to use Microsoft Office, and by applying the information and skills that I was already familiar with, I learned to effectively use an online software that was entirely new to me.

Q. Have you learned to use information in a course that you have applied to a different situation?

During my freshman year I took a course called COM 217, “Science Writing and Presentation.” In this course, I learned the basics of presenting science to informed and lay audience members, how to craft compelling and informative posters, and write science articles. I used the skills and information I learned in this course to present my research poster for the first time at the Purdue Undergraduate Research Symposium, and publish my work in the 2016 edition of JPUR. Had I not taken this course, I would not have known how to present science, both orally and through writing, effectively.

This article is part of the Inform Purdue 2017 information literacy campaign. Read more about it at blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/2017/10/12/inform-purdue-2017/.


In his college career at Purdue University, Austin Coon–a senior double economics Honors and management major–has found participating in case competitions to be an excellent way to apply what he’s learned in the classroom and to real-world business scenarios.

“Taking part in case competitions has vastly improved my public-speaking skills and given me confidence to succeed in job interviews. In a typical case competition, participants are given anywhere from four hours to two weeks to solve a case with a team. During that time, you are tasked with becoming an expert in the given problem and industry. Oftentimes, you have to start right at square one, as you will be presented with an issue that you know nothing about,” he explained.

Coon is one of many Purdue students whose learning activities outside of the classroom require information literacy skills. In the brief Q&A below, he talks about how he has applied those skills to his areas of study in economics and management.

Q. What are ways that you are learning to use information at Purdue that will be useful for your future professional (or personal) endeavors?

A.  Case competitions allow students to expand their knowledge by challenging them to learn as much about a topic or industry as possible in a short time frame. Purdue offers several competitions a year—such as the annual Midwest Business Libraries Case Competition (formerly known as the Parrish Library Case Competition)—that target students who have never competed in a case before.

Furthermore, as you improve your ability to perform in the introductory case competitions, Purdue offers more advanced competitions, for which they will fly you around the country to compete. During my sophomore year, I was fortunate enough to be taken to the University of Connecticut to compete in a competition there.

Q. Describe a time when you learned to use information in a new way to help you accomplish something.

A. A couple of years ago, I competed in an international case competition about big data and applying the data to the human resource (HR) practices of a company in the auto industry. At the time, I knew nothing about big data, had never taken a class on HR, and had very little experience with the auto industry. My team members and I were all in the same boat. We spent that week diving as deep as we could in those three topics and then were able to build a presentation that we were incredibly proud of when we were finished. We ended up earning second place, which was the best placement a Purdue team has ever achieved in the competition.

Q. Have you learned to use information in a course that you have applied to a different situation?

A. Purdue and case competitions have strengthened my ability to process large amounts of information and condense it. For example, in my internship this past summer, I worked with large sets of data. One of my tasks was to turn the data into a “meaningful story” to present to the company’s senior leadership team.

To explain, I was tasked with creating a scorecard that tracked our relationship health with our different clients, so I would track to see which of our clients were happy with us and which were upset, as well as what made them happy or upset.

To create this scorecard, I analyzed data on the hundreds of different metrics that my company recorded for each client, as well as conducted interviews with client contact leaders in the organization to get a holistic understanding of what made clients upset.

After understanding this, I was able to design a scorecard that was automatically populated with objective metrics and organized in an easy-to-understand color code and format for each of the 180 different clients that we tracked internally.

By doing this, I was able to give our leadership a way to pinpoint quickly any pain points we had with our clients. With this knowledge, they could then focus their efforts on any key issues to improve client satisfaction.

My experiences at Purdue have given me the confidence to believe in my own abilities and to trust that I will produce a product of high quality. My time at Purdue has also made me feel properly prepared to work with several other full-time employees that are high in the organization’s hierarchy.


Related

“Inform Purdue,” Purdue Libraries’ Information Literacy Social Media Campaign, to Launch Oct. 16
Inform Purdue: Purdue Libraries’ Information Literacy Celebration
Inform Purdue: Applying Information Literacy to Interior Design

This article is part of the Inform Purdue 2017 information literacy campaign. Read more about it at blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/2017/10/12/inform-purdue-2017/.


Amanda Wegener, Purdue UniversityAs part of her coursework since she arrived at Purdue University as a freshman, Amanda Wegener, a junior interior design major, has been learning to apply her information literacy skills.

“As an interior designer, I have a background in basic design, and since my first year here, I’ve been analyzing and critiquing designs. In our courses, we’re taught to think like designers and see the world the way they see it,” Wegener explained.

For her freshman history honors course, her assignment was to analyze the designs of NASA mission patches, which turned out to be a perfect opportunity to apply her information literacy skills and engage with primary research materials in the Purdue University Archives and Special CollectionsBarron Hilton Flight and Space Exploration Archives.

“When I was researching NASA mission patches and the preliminary drafts of the designs and the thought processes behind their designs, I mentally dissected the elements–to see how each of them served a purpose to enhance the purpose of the whole. I also thought about how the psychology of color plays into the color choices and how the shapes played into the design and how the designers used symbolism to represent parts of the mission or the crew,” she added.

Under the mentorship of History Professor Michael G. Smith, Wegner took her research one step further and submitted her work to “Quest: The History of Spaceflight Quarterly,” where her research was published.

Wegener said that learning to use information and interpret and apply it has been integral to her success at Purdue. In a brief Q&A piece below, she talks about information literacy and its importance for her current and future projects and experiences.

Q. What are ways that you are learning to use information at Purdue that will be useful for your future professional (or personal) endeavors?

A. There are a number of ways I’ve been getting experience seeking out and utilizing information over my last couple of years here. I’m an interior designer, and research is critical to our field, both the softer side of understanding clients and determining their needs in a space, but also a more scientific side of a current space, what materials are made of and how that affects a space, or how to figure out how much lighting a space needs. Then all that information, technical or vague, needs to be transformed into multiple languages, one for the client, another for designers, and another for contractors.

One super helpful thing I’ve learned at Purdue is how to communicate with people from vastly different fields with completely different vocabularies. I’ve been able to explore how to use terms they understand to communicate a concept from my world. This is something I started realizing I loved doing in high school—translating one person’s jargon into another so that others can understand. This will be super helpful as a designer, but also in communicating with any and every individual I may come across.

Q. Describe a time when you learned to use information in a new way to help you accomplish something.

A. For so much of many students’ college careers, they are focused on learning the facts so they can regurgitate them on tests. But when doing original research on primary materials, there are so many little details about history that you could never discover in a history book or course. It makes history relevant and fascinating because it makes it real and personal, and people care about that and find it interesting. People keep asking me about my work this summer since I’ve been “on the inside” in a way, but not even really, with the Amelia Earhart story. Since I worked with the Frederick Noonan collection, I learned many details about Earhart’s last flight, and I always had interesting updates for my friends and family, which provided quite a handy topic of conversation that all parties enjoyed.

In other ways, I’ve used my experience as a history research student in research more directly related to my major, such as my research this last spring about sustainable lighting design and also in my work last summer at in the ASC.

Q. Have you learned to use information in a course that you have applied to a different situation?

A. My research with Flight Paths was on the design of NASA mission patches, which information I used recently, when the Archives was contributing to an event at the Gus Grissom Museum. We said we would provide an activity for children, and I designed a worksheet for them to design their own patch with some small description on what flight patches were. I also made a more detailed sheet, which included three NASA insignia and some of the thought process behind those designs, for adults. It was also interesting to go back and forth and see how researching NASA design influenced my design work and how being a designer helped me understand how the NASA insignia were designed—it went both ways.

As for the courses in my major, I have used that information in all kinds of other spheres in my life, especially in my “Interior Materials and Finishes” class from last spring. I’ve been advising a friend and her dad who are replacing the flooring in a small business they own, or helping another friend pick out paint sheen, or giving suggestions to the Residence Life Manager of my apartment building about counter tops. It comes up in all kinds of casual conversations with friends and goes way beyond the classroom.


Related

“Inform Purdue,” Purdue Libraries’ Information Literacy Social Media Campaign, to Launch Oct. 16
Inform Purdue: Purdue Libraries’ Information Literacy Celebration

Read more from Inform Purdue at blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/category/inform-purdue/


Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Over the last few years, the U.S. government, as well as governments in various states, have commemorated October as Information Literacy Awareness month. This October, Purdue University Libraries continues the tradition with our own celebration of the importance of information literacy through “Inform Purdue,” a social media campaign that will share Purdue faculty members’ and students’ own stories of teaching and learning about information literacy and how it helps them accomplish their educational and professional goals. All content will be posted on Purdue Libraries’ various social media feeds (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram) over the next few weeks.

“It is extremely challenging to navigate and make sense of the information we need to make good decisions in today’s information environment,” notes Purdue University Libraries Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist Clarence Maybee. “That is true if one is deciding which history journals to use to research a topic for class, purchasing a new car, or presenting to the boss on a new direction the company should embark upon.”

At Purdue, this challenging navigation is where Maybee and his fellow colleagues at Purdue Libraries come in to steer learners onto the path of finding, evaluating, interpreting, and applying information to solve problems and construct new meanings.

First up in the multi-week campaign is a short video featuring Nancy Peleaz, associate professor in the Purdue University Department of Biological Sciences. But before you watch the video, take a moment to read–via the brief Q&A below–more about Dr. Maybee’s role as Purdue’s information literacy specialist, as well as the other ways Purdue Libraries personnel contribute to information literacy and learning at Purdue.

Q. Tell me a bit about your role as the information literacy specialist at Purdue University Libraries, e.g., what kinds of responsibilities do you have in this position in regard to: Purdue students? Purdue faculty? other Purdue Libraries users?

Maybee: I have the best job at Purdue! I work with Libraries faculty and staff to address the challenges students often face in this era, one in which they are inundated with an excess of information. We meet with students in their courses and teach them how to use information critically to complete their assignments. We also work regularly with Purdue instructors to develop class activities and assignments in which students learn about using information as they engage with the course content. I also conduct information literacy research and use the findings to inform my teaching efforts at Purdue. I work with closely with Libraries faculty and staff to keep them abreast of advances in information literacy discussed in the field and to continue to develop our excellence in teaching.

Additionally, I lead the Libraries’ involvement in the Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation (IMPACT) program, in which Libraries faculty and staff work in teams with instructional developers and teachers to redesign courses to make them more student-centered. The Libraries faculty and staff involved in IMPACT work with teachers to help their students critically use information to learn in the active and dynamic environments that are the hallmark of IMPACT courses.

Q. Why is it important for the Purdue Libraries to have an information literacy specialist?

Maybee: There was a time when most of the information a student needed for class was handed out by the instructor or delivered via the instructor’s lecture. That is not true today—students may gather a wide variety of materials from online, or even collect first-hand information through interviews or observations. They need to be able to critically evaluate and analyze the information they are using to learn, inside and outside of the classroom. An information literacy specialist, through teaching and research, sheds light on the needs of the 21st century learner and offers pedagogic tools for enabling learners to navigate the complexity of today’s information landscape.

Q. How do you provide information literacy resources to Purdue, e.g., through particular programs, like IMPACT, or through other initiatives?

Maybee: The Purdue Libraries information literacy efforts align with the Purdue Moves initiative’s goal of creating Transformative Education, which emphasizes the development of innovative approaches to teaching and learning. Working with campus partners to create IMPACT is one of many efforts through which the Libraries is working to transform education.

Information literacy plays a big role in educational innovation, which often encourages learners to use information in new and challenging ways. Purdue Libraries personnel focus their information literacy efforts on teaching students to use information in the context of learning. Libraries faculty, who liaise with departments at Purdue, work with teachers to integrate information literacy into curricula. Many Libraries faculty and staff also work with other campus learning initiatives, such as partnering with The Graduate School to teach graduate students to use and manage data, or working with the office of Undergraduate Research to provide workshops for undergraduate researchers on different aspects of the research process and communicating as a scholar.

Q. Who else in Purdue Libraries provides information literacy resources for Purdue students and faculty?

Maybee: The Libraries faculty and staff at Purdue all endeavor to enable learners to find and critically use information for their coursework or other activities. The Libraries faculty who liaise with specific departments work very closely with those faculty and students. Libraries faculty and staff are also dedicated to teaching students and faculty at Purdue to use and manage data and take part in scholarly communication. Libraries faculty also serve on campus committees, such as the Undergraduate Curriculum Council (UCC), where our expertise is put to use to help ensure that information literacy is part of the student learning experience at Purdue.

That said, a few people in the Libraries have very specific roles in advancing information literacy on campus. For example, Rachel Fundator, the information literacy instruction designer, works to advance information literacy through the IMPACT program and on information literacy efforts across the Libraries. Michael Flierl, the learning design specialist, works closely with students in transition, such as first-year or international students, to enable them to use information to learn. Rachel, Michael, and I work as a team to inform the Libraries’ efforts to address the information literacy needs of faculty and students at Purdue.

Q. Any other important information to include about information literacy and its role in the information age?

Maybee: When people are learning, they are almost always using information. Purdue Libraries’ information literacy efforts aim to teach students to critically use information to learn and make informed decisions while at Purdue and in their lives after graduation.


Nancy Peleaz, Associate Professor, Purdue University Department of Biological Sciences

Related

“Inform Purdue,” Purdue Libraries’ Information Literacy Social Media Campaign, to Launch Oct. 16

To access all the Inform Purdue posts, visit http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/category/inform-purdue/


Inform Purdue: Purdue Libraries 2017 Information Literacy Campaign

Check out Inform Purdue posts at go.lib.purdue.edu/informpurdue17

One of the pillars of the Purdue University Libraries’ learning model is to cultivate information literacy among students to support Purdue University’s goal to deliver student-centered learning. Student-centered learning requires that learners know how to find, evaluate, interpret, and apply information to solve problems and construct new meanings.

According to Purdue Libraries Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist Clarence Maybee, to support learners in today’s information-rich environment, the Purdue Libraries faculty and staff members are committed to enhancing student information literacy by advancing educational practice and research.

To highlight the importance of information literacy, on Monday, Oct. 16, Purdue Libraries is launching “Inform Purdue,” an information literacy social media campaign. In a series of videos and images, the campaign will feature Purdue University faculty and students talking about how they have applied information literacy in their courses and research.

“Purdue Libraries’ approach to information literacy is to teach students to use information in the context of learning about something—much as they will do on the job, or to make personal decisions after graduation,” Maybee explained. “In the ‘Inform Purdue’ campaign, Purdue students, faculty, and staff share their own ‘stories’ of teaching and learning about information literacy, and how it helps them to accomplish their educational and professional goals.”

Content in the “Inform Purdue” campaign will be posted on Purdue Libraries Facebook page and Instagram and Twitter feeds (see www.facebook.com/PurdueLibraries/; twitter.com/PurdueLibraries; and www.instagram.com/purdueulibraries/). Purdue students, faculty, and staff will be encouraged to share how they apply information literacy in comments and in retweets (with the hashtag #InformPurdue).

For more information about Purdue Libraries’ information literacy resources, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/infolit, Purdue Libraries’ Information Literacy blog at http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/infolit/, or contact Maybee at (765) 494-7603 or via email at cmaybee@purdue.edu.