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‘WALC’ category

Purdue Univeristy student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

by Teresa Koltzenburg, Purdue Libraries

Purdue University senior Jacob Nolley is in no danger of lacking entrepreneurial ideas and endeavor. Nolley—a dual marketing and management major in the Purdue Krannert School of Management and president of the Purdue Honors College Mentor Council—and his business partner and best friend, Collin Clevenger (who attends Ball State University), have both embodied the entrepreneurial spirit since they were in fourth grade together many years ago. Back then, the Shelbyville (IN) natives started a business selling lollipops and pencil erasers to their elementary-school classmates. The pair’s business partnership continued into their high school years, when they founded a headband business together and sold their headband products to fellow students and friends.

The GripIt Mobile Device Holder

The GripIt mobile device holder

Most recently, Nolley and Clevenger started the product-development venture The Graphite Lab, through which they hope to help other young entrepreneurs take their product ideas to market successfully. As a proof of their product-development company concept, Nolley and Clevenger have developed their very own product, the GripIt, a holder for mobile devices, which they describe as “the most comfortable, customizable, and care-free way to hold your device.” Sleeker (for carrying a device in one’s pocket) than the popular pop-up holders—and still creating a more secure grip on one’s valuable mobile device—GripIt attaches easily to mobile devices (including tablets) and features 16 different band colors. Nolley said, too, those who order GripIt in bulk orders (for giveaways and brand awareness “swag”) will have even more customizable options (e.g., printing the bands and/or more color options).

Recently, the pair launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to help them purchase start-up capital, including a printer so they can make some of the product pieces themselves. But before they could start marketing GripIt (and the services of The Graphite Lab) and launch their Indiegogo campaign, Nolley and Clevenger needed a product prototype to show to prospective investors and to take to manufacturing partners. That’s where the 3D printing resources in the Purdue University Libraries’ Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) proved to be integral. (D-VELoP is part of the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.) After creating a design using OnShape online product-design software, Nolley used D-VELoP’s 3D printing resources and the D-VELoP staff members’ expertise to help him hone the prototype.

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries' Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries' Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries’ Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

“Libraries personnel, like [Instructional Developer] Aly Edmondson helped me a great deal,” Nolley explained. “I talked with her and other D-VELoP personnel about what they would recommend for this particular prototype design. Through this process, I learned how to design a product to be manufactured, as there are lot of different things that need to be implemented in this type of design—one that will be 3D printed and injection molded— for it to work. I went through about 25 iterations before I came to the final prototype design, and every time I sent a design to be 3D printed, I got it back promptly, and they gave me great feedback, which was super helpful,” he added.

Nolley—who is also minoring in creative writing and completed Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—not only credits D-VELoP’s resources and personnel for helping him and his partner get to this point with the start-up The Graphite Lab and the GripIt product, but he also noted that many people, resources, and services at Purdue have been invaluable during his college career.

“No one has helped me more at Purdue than Debbi Bearden, my academic advisor in the Krannert Leaders Academy. She has helped provide me with all the many, wonderful opportunities I have benefited from as a Purdue student. Debbi has made my time at Purdue absolutely the most fruitful experience I have had in my life,” he noted.

Nolley also took advantage of Purdue University’s Foundry, which, according to the Purdue Foundry website, “exists to help Purdue students, faculty, and local alumni move ideas to the marketplace more quickly.”

“My freshman year at Purdue, I founded ‘Jacob’s Loom,’ a start-up project that I ended up closing because of financing problems, which is part of the inspiration for using the crowdfunding approach for Collin’s and my current start-up project,” he explained. “The resources at the Purdue Foundry and the staff there—like Tim Peoples, Purdue Foundry managing director, and John Hanak, managing director of Purdue Ventures—were pivotal in providing me with the skills to be successful with The Graphite Lab and GripIt.”

Nolley also credits his former Purdue instructor Beth Carroll (who now works in the retail sector)—who taught courses in Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—for helping him learn and hone his entrepreneurial knowledge and skills.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

“She is one of the most helpful faculty members I have ever worked with,” Nolley said.

Nolley and Clevenger launched their Indiegogo campaign just this week, and they only have short window, about a month, to get to their fundraising goal of $15,000. The good news is that, as of June 1, they already have close to 100 backers and have raised more than $1,000.

“We used Indiegogo because we wanted to show it is possible that you do not have to sell your ideas and efforts to get your company off the ground. That is what we want to do with our customers of The Graphite Lab,” Nolley explained. “So, when people bring their products to us, we want to help them get their ideas off the ground and sell their products through our sales channels, but we do not want to own their products. Many times, what happens with young entrepreneurs, in order to get their ideas to market, they have to ‘sell their souls to the devil,’ so to speak, and sell off their companies and product-development ideas and efforts. So, in the long term, they do not earn those profits. We want to lead by example, and we are trying to show young entrepreneurs that they do not have to sell their companies and/or ideas. We are providing them with another option through The Graphite Lab.”

For more information, check out the GripIt Indiegogo campaign at www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-gripit-iphone-security#/ and/or contact Nolley at JacobNolley@gmail.com or Clevenger at CollinAClevenger@gmail.com.

 

Purdue Libraries: March 2018 Mobile Making Workshops

 

Faculty and staff in the Library of Engineering & Science & D-VELoP (Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue) are hosting two more of the popular Mobile Making workshops in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) in March.

This month, each workshop will feature 3D-printed jewelry- and keychain-making activities.

D-VELoP workshops, which are free and open to all those at Purdue University, are set from 1-4 p.m. Thursday, March 8 and Thursday, March 22, and are located just to the east of the first floor information desk in the WALC.

“We’ll have the 3D printed items already printed, so all you have to do is turn them into earrings or key chains,” noted Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Sarah Huber.

Learn more about D-VELoP at www.lib.purdue.edu/d-velop.

 

Several Purdue University students showed the many reasons why they love Purdue Libraries in the Purdue University Libraries’ fifth “Why I Love Purdue Libraries” video contest. This fall, we added a twist to the contest theme and asked students to produce video entries that show why they love the newly opened Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), home of the Library of Engineering and Science.

The contest–which was announced in Fall 2017 and is supported by the Purdue Federal Credit Union–was open to Purdue students and received 24 entries for the Fall 2017 competition. All entries were judged by members of the Undergraduate Student Libraries Advisory Council.

Four videos – first, second, and two videos for a third-place tie – were selected as winners of the first $1,000 prize, second $750 prize, and third $500 prize. Five students produced the videos. They include:

  • First Place Cole Griffin, senior, industrial engineering major, and Anna Magner, junior, selling and sales management major: each will receive half of the $1,000;
  • Second PlaceJake Heidecker, sophomore, finance and supply chain management double major: $750; and
  • Third Place Tie Jason Kelly, freshman, engineering major, and Matt Schnelker, senior, computer information technology major; each will receive $500.

The winners of the Fall 2017 Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest joined Dean of Libraries Jim Mullins and Purdue Federal Credit Union (PFCU) Vice President Jeff Love for a special presentation of their awards in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, Library of Engineering and Science. The Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest was supported by Purdue Federal Credit Union. Pictured (L to R): Anna Magner, Cole Griffin, Jeff Love, Jim Mullins, Jake Heidecker, Jason Kelly, and Matt Schnelker.

The winners of the Fall 2017 Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest joined Dean of Libraries Jim Mullins and Purdue Federal Credit Union (PFCU) Vice President Jeff Love for a special presentation of their awards in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, Library of Engineering and Science. The Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest was supported by Purdue Federal Credit Union. The winners and Dean Mullins and Vice President Love are pictured standing on the third floor of the WALC, in front of the window overlooking the Mullins Reading Room. Pictured, L to R, are: Anna Magner, Cole Griffin, Jeff Love, Jim Mullins, Jake Heidecker, Jason Kelly, and Matt Schnelker.


View the winning videos on the “Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC” Fall 2017 Video Contest YouTube Playlist at www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfiLH31ZZsO136sTrEir-exeiBi1X30wI


First Place: Cole Griffin and Anna Magner


Second Place: Jake Heidecker


Third Place (Tie): Matt Schnelker


Third Place (Tie): Jason Kelly

Why I Love Purdue Libraries' WALC Video Contest 2017Show what you love about the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center and the Library of Engineering and Science and you could win $1,000 in the 2017 Purdue University Libraries’ Video Contest!

This year, with the opening of the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), the Purdue Libraries’ annual video contest will have the theme: “Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC.”

All students who attend Purdue University on the West Lafayette campus are eligible to enter. Prizes are as follows:

  • 1st Prize = $1,000
  • 2nd Prize = $750
  • 3rd Prize = $500

Deadline to enter is 11:59 p.m. Monday, Nov. 6. Complete rules and guidelines are listed below.

Students interested in entering video productions are encouraged to focus on the many resources offered in the building, including, but not limited to:

Winners will be announced in mid-November, early December.

Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest Rules & Guidelines

About the Contest

This video contest is an opportunity for Purdue University undergraduate and graduate students to communicate in a visual, video format why they love the Purdue University Libraries’ newly opened library building, the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, which houses the Library of Engineering and Science.

Finalists will be selected by a student panel comprised of the Undergraduate Student Libraries Advisory Council (USLAC). Winners will be selected by the Dean of Libraries and Libraries Associate Deans.

Who Can Enter

Purdue undergraduate and graduate students currently enrolled at Purdue University (West Lafayette campus) are eligible to enter the contest.

What and How to Enter

  • All video entries must be an original work made between October and November 2017.
  • There is no fee for submitting the entry.
  • Only one entry may be entered per person or group/team.
  • A maximum of six people may participate in any one group/team, and group/team members will evenly split any awarded prize.
  • Entries must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. Monday, Nov. 6, 2017.
  • Files can be sent to tkoltzen@purdue.edu, or if the file sizes are too large, please submit via DropBox, WeTransfer, Purdue’s File Locker service, or some other online transfer service/resource to the above-listed email address. Only files sent through one of these ways will be entered into the contest; please DO NOT send a YouTube or Vimeo link.
  • Please submit a transcript or caption file of the dialogue or text appearing in the video and include it with the video file sent to tkoltzen@purdue.edu or in a compressed folder sent via a file transfer service (see above).

Winners

The Undergraduate Student Libraries Advisory Council (USLAC) will judge all eligible videos and make recommendations to the Dean of Libraries and Associate Deans of Libraries for final approval.

Prizes

Winning first-, second-, and third-place video producers will be awarded the following: 1st Place = $1,000; 2nd Place = $750; and 3rd Place = $500. The monetary award will be given to an individual, or divided evenly among the group if the submission is a team project. All monetary awards will run through financial aid and post to any outstanding balance first before payment is made to any winner.

The winning videos may be used by Purdue University Libraries in marketing and promotional materials. The videos selected as finalists may appear on Purdue University Libraries’ website (lib.purdue.edu) or via Purdue University’s social media channels.

The Fine Print

  • Terms of Use for Contestants: Contestants agree that Purdue University may publish their videos and name(s) and may use both in future advertising campaigns and/or marketing materials; entry of a video affirms that contestants agree to the terms of use.
  • All participants must be 18 years or older.
  • Video entries must be between 1-3 minutes in length.
  • A transcript or caption file must be submitted with each video to meet ADA compliance (file should be included in a compressed folder with the video file).
  • Videos must focus on the Wilmeth Active Learning Center and Library of Engineering and Science spaces, environment, services, resources, and expertise and should illustrate diversity and be representative to the University/Libraries constituencies.
  • All contest entrants must be current, enrolled students at Purdue University West Lafayette as of Sept. 1, 2017.
  • Videos may have up to 6 producers/team members, with the award divided evenly among the team.
  • Entries may be live-action or animation.
  • Copyright Guidelines: Music, images, and video clips included in the video must be legally obtained either by obtaining the copyright holder’s permission, using materials licensed through Creative Commons licensing, or using entirely original content created by the person(s) submitting the project.
  • Purdue University Libraries has no obligation to use the winning videos for any purpose whatsoever.
  • Purdue University is not responsible for any lost, delayed, damaged, misdirected, or illegal submissions.
  • No entries will be returned.
  • Purdue University Libraries staff may disqualify any entry based on content and/or production.
  • All costs associated with making and submitting a video are the contestant’s responsibility. Purdue University will not reimburse or be responsible for any costs incurred in the making or submission of any entry.
  • Purdue University Libraries reserves the right not to choose a winner.
  • All monetary awards will run through financial aid and post to any outstanding balance first before payment is made to any winner.

Questions can be directed to Teresa Koltzenburg, director of strategic communication at Purdue Libraries, @ tkoltzen@purdue.edu.

Starting Monday, Aug. 21, the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, which houses the Library of Engineering and Science, will be open 24 hours per day, seven days a week (most of the year) with Purdue University ID (PUID) swipe access. Hicks Undergraduate Library will provide 24/7 access through Sunday, Aug. 20.

For a comprehensive list of Purdue Libraries’ hours, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/hoursList.

The Wilmeth Active Learning Center houses the Library of Engineering and Science.

The Wilmeth Active Learning Center houses the Library of Engineering and Science. Photo courtesy of Trevor Mahlmann.

Purdue University’s newest building, the Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) will open to the public Monday, August 7.

Over the summer, Purdue Libraries faculty and staff consolidated the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Engineering; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries to form the Library of Engineering and Science in one location at the heart of campus.

The WALC houses 27 collaborative active-learning classrooms and will be a daily academic destination for approximately 5,000 Purdue students and faculty. (Read more about the background of the facility at www.lib.purdue.edu/walc/.)

The WALC exemplifies Purdue University’s commitment to undergraduate education. The 1924 Heat and Power Plant (HPN), with its iconic smoke stack, stood for nearly 90 years on the site of the WALC. HPN not only provided power and heat to the dynamic university community, but it also served as a laboratory for engineering students. Today, we would refer to that learning experience as “active learning.”

Below are some FAQs about the new facility.

.Q. What does the Library of Engineering and Science offer?

A. The Library of Engineering and Science (LOES) in the WALC holds approximately 30,000 print volumes, emphasizes the focus on provision of digital resources, and consolidates the holdings and services of six formerly separate libraries into one easily accessible location.

The materials selected for the physical collection of the Library of Engineering and Science have been evaluated by Libraries faculty with input from departmental faculty. The books, reference collection, and standards have been identified as high-use, high-demand materials that best support the teaching and learning goals of the curricula within the schools and departments.

LOES also houses Libraries faculty and staff members, who specialize in access to information resources in engineering and science, as well as in instructing students on how to identify, locate, critique, and retrieve scholarly information. In collaboration with their faculty colleagues in the colleges and schools, the Libraries faculty teach specialized courses and/or participate as team faculty members.

Although the focus of LOES is to provide access to information in engineering and science, the use of resources and space is open to all Purdue students and faculty.

The Library of Engineering and Science is located on the second floor of the WALC.

The Library of Engineering and Science is located on the second floor of the WALC.

Q. How are the active-learning classrooms different from what many would consider a “traditional” classroom, with student seating and a lectern for the instructor?

WALC’s design reflects the most contemporary methods for teaching and learning. The 27 active-learning classrooms are designed with flexible, collaborative seating options that offer a range of team-based learning experiences. Library spaces are adjacent to classrooms throughout the WALC.

At the close of regular instructional hours, the entire WALC, including the classrooms, becomes a library, with all spaces providing opportunities for individual and collaborative study. The WALC is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week nearly the entire year, with a few exceptions.*

Q. What else does the Wilmeth Active Learning Center offer for Purdue students and faculty?

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center's Reading Room.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center’s Reading Room.

Reading Room: Since their inception, a traditional element of libraries has been the large reading room. Here, students and faculty can consult materials held by the library, as well as work in a space designed to be conducive to thinking, reflection, and writing. The Reading Room in the WALC serves as a link between the historic role of libraries and the dynamics of an active-learning environment. The view of the iconic Clock Tower, with its bells denoting each hour and at the beginning and end of a class session, serves as a unique reminder that one is truly at Purdue University.

Data Visualization Experience Lab of PurdueData Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP): D-VELoP provides a space where students, staff and faculty can explore different visualization tools designed to turn their data into knowledge. D-VELoP includes a staffed, open-use 16-seat teaching computer lab. The computers are loaded with visualization programs, and each set up includes large and/or multiple monitors enabling the viewing of data at different scales. A 3×3 tile wall of 4k monitors can be used for presentations, class discussions, or exhibits of data visualizations. Technological tools, such as micro-controller kits and GoPro cameras, allow students to experiment without having to purchase their own. Additionally, four Lulzbot TAZ6 3d printers allow students to visualize their data and designs in a tactile, manipulatable format.

Robust workshops and training programs, in coordination with other maker-related units on campus, help students and faculty to become familiar with technologies they can employ in order to carry out their class projects, pursue personal interests, or advance their research programs.

Hiler Theater: Designed to accommodate an audience of 308 people, the Hiler Theater can serve as a venue for such active-learning instructional activities as drama, film, and lectures during the day, as well as special evening programs for the campus and community. The seats are equipped with tablet arms to accommodate note-taking during presentations and lectures.

Artifacts and Audio Tour: The walls of the WALC are rich with reproductions of historic photographs of the Purdue University campus from the Purdue University Libraries’ Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center. Artifacts and photographs from the working 1924 Power and Heating Plant can be found throughout the building. These items memorialize the rich legacy of this central site on the Purdue campus.

A smartphone tour enhances the exhibits in the WALC by providing information and interactive activities designed to make a visitor’s experience an extension of the WALC active-learning philosophy.

An Au Bon Pain Café is located on the main level of the WALC. It is known for serving fresh baked goods, as well as other morning and lunchtime sandwiches.

Additionally, the 164,000-square-foot facility offers 100 ITaP computers,  both open and enclosed group study spaces, large monitors/screens and whiteboards for group collaboration, poster printing and other printing resources, and much more!

Purdue students can work together in groups in the study spaces offered in the Purdue University's new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue students can work together in groups in the study spaces offered in the Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Q. With the consolidation of libraries, how many libraries are open on the West Lafayette Campus?

A. Below is a list of the libraries on Purdue University’s West Lafayette campus before and after the WALC:

The Purdue Libraries on West Lafayette campus before WALC
The list of Purdue Libraries as of August 2017 (opening of WALC)
Archives and Special Collections Archives and Special Collections
Aviation Technology Aviation Technology
Black Cultural Center Black Cultural Center
Chemistry* Engineering and Science**
Earth, Atmospheric, Planetary Sciences (EAPS)* Hicks Undergraduate
Engineering* Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE)
Hicks Undergraduate Mathematical Sciences
Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Parrish Management and Economics
Life Sciences* Veterinary Medical
Mathematical Sciences
Parrish Management and Economics
Pharmacy, Nursing, Health*
Physics*
Veterinary Medical

* These libraries were combined in the new Library of Engineering and Science** in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Q. What are the libraries’ hours?

A. The hours of each of Purdue University Libraries are listed at www.lib.purdue.edu/hoursList.

*After the Fall 2017 semester begins, the WALC will remain open 24 hours per day (with PUID card swipe), and, as of Sunday, Aug. 20, the Hicks Undergraduate Library will no longer be open 24 hours per day.

***

“To build up the future, you have to know the past.” — Otto Frank

“From the Past to the Future” series by Teresa Brown also appears in INSIDe, the Purdue University Libraries’ newsletter for Libraries personnel. As faculty and staff in Purdue University Libraries consolidate six libraries in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center this summer, we’ll feature the history of each of the now closed libraries here weekly.

In 1924, the general policy of the University involved the centralization of the books and their uses for reference in the Main Library Building. In certain instances however, there were departures from this policy and collections of books were placed in other buildings on campus.

The most important of these collections was the Chemistry Library, located in the Chemistry building. It was the oldest and largest of the department libraries. Practically all the usable books and periodicals relating to Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, about 2,000 in all, were housed in this library where they were readily accessible for reference to the students at work in the laboratories of the department. University Librarian William M. Hepburn believed departmental libraries sprang from the “rapid growth of library collections without a corresponding increase in the size of the Main Library Building.”

In 1929, a complete dictionary catalog and shelf list were prepared for the books shelved in the Chemistry Library, and it was planned to include cards for the chemical books kept in the General, Chemical Engineering and Agricultural Experiment Station libraries. A tri-weekly messenger service was established to deliver books and periodicals to departmental libraries and to deliver and pick up periodicals circulated to 20 departments for faculty use.

In 1930, for the first time the Library leadership provided a part-time assistant to users of departmental collections in Chemistry and Pharmacy. According to M.G. Mellon’s autobiography, the first Chemistry librarian was Bernice Dunten, who had been a WWI Army Nurse. She remained the librarian until 1940, when she moved to the Pharmacy Library. Mellon noted that, in the hot summers of 1934 and 1936, she ejected students (presumably male) from the library for going “topless.”

Interior of Purdue University Libraries' Chemistry Library in early 2017.

Interior of Purdue University Libraries’ Chemistry Library in early 2017.

Ms. Dunten was followed by Ruth Power (1940-49), a graduate (like Dunten) of the University of Illinois Library School. She was followed (perhaps) by someone named Dunbar (Mellon is not clear about this in his autobiography).

In 1948-49, responsibility for the Chemistry Library shifted from the department head to the Director of Libraries John Moriarty.

The new Chemistry building was completed in 1955 at a cost of over $4,500,000, and the Chemistry Library moved into its new home with Librarian Fred J. Bassett (1951-56) overseeing its grand opening. The departmental library, with a capacity of 40,000 volumes, was located on the third floor of the new building. The description of the library in the open house brochure read as follows: “On entering it (the library) one finds oneself in a large, acoustically treated, air-conditioned reading room with bookshelves around the sides and long study tables and chairs in the center. The Librarian’s desk is immediately to the right, and behind this are two small rooms where books may be repaired or prepared for binding. At the left in the reading room is a long alcove for abstract journals. Beyond this is a separate small reading room with current journals and magazines arranged on open shelves. To the west of the main reading room is the stack room. The stacks are constructed in three tiers and extend from the third floor to the ceiling of the fourth floor. A small service elevator has been installed to facilitate the transportation of books between the several levels of stacks. This room is also supplied with 21 study carrels, seven on each tier. There is no laboratory above any part of the library so that a leakage of water and chemical cannot occur in such a way as to damage the books and manuscripts.”

Bassett was followed by James Van Luik, who was there for two years (1956-58). He was presumably followed by Dorothy Kreman, who served until John Pinzelik started in 1960 and retired in 1993. Bartow Culp followed until his retirement in 2009. In 2003, Michael Fosmire was appointed as Head, Physical Sciences, Engineering and Technology Division, with Jeremy Garritano serving as Chemistry librarian (June 2004-May 2014). Currently David Zwicky is assistant professor liaison for the Chemistry department.

The Chemistry library has undergone some cosmetic updates over the years including a new circulation desk and study carrels. As a teaching and research library, it has continued to stay up-to-date with the services it offers to the Purdue staff and students and surrounding community. In 2007, The Mellon CyberChemistry Lab was opened and featured 10 PCs with software specifically related to chemistry, math, and citation management. The core objective of this space was to help users more effectively apply the information that was available to them, and as a result make their assignments and their research more meaningful.

Purdue University Libraries faculty and staff have been proud to host the “Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference this week at Purdue University. Below are tweets and images from the #BTAALib17, which began Tuesday morning at Purdue.

Highlights also include tweets and photos from the Tuesday evening reception in Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center. Conference attendees were among the first groups outside of Purdue to tour the new building.

Purdue Libraries Dean Jim Mullins Opening #BTAALib17

Purdue Libraries Dean Jim Mullins Opening #BTAALib17

Lorcan Dempsey

Lorcan Dempsey

Assistant Director for Research / South Asian Studies Liaison Librarian Mary Rader, University of Texas Libraries, presenting, "Cooperative Collection Development & South Asian Studies."

Assistant Director for Research / South Asian Studies Liaison Librarian Mary Rader, University of Texas Libraries, presenting, “Cooperative Collection Development & South Asian Studies.”

 

Frank Dooley, Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, Purdue University

Frank Dooley, Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, Purdue University

 

#BTAALib17

#BTAALib17

Transformation Tuesday

Tuesday evening conference attendees were treated to a sneak peek inside the Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center, which houses the Library of Engineering and Science, 27 classrooms designed for active learning (which will stay open after class hours to provide study space), data visualization and 3D printing resources, the Hiler Theater, group study rooms, computer work stations, 24/7 access (with Purdue University ID)… a few of the new building’s features.

The WALC, constructed on the former site of the Purdue Power Plant, which was used as a hands-on teaching facility for Purdue Engineering faculty and students, “represents the transformation of teaching and learning at Purdue.” The building features archival photographs of scenes from inside the former Power Plant. An audio tour (that can be experienced via an app on a mobile phone or through a website), which describes the murals and the artifacts showcased in the WALC, is an active learning resource that will be available when the building opens Aug. 7.

Active Learning in Purdue Power Plant, c. 1934

One of the murals in Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center. “Active Learning in Purdue Power Plant.”

 

The 2013 article, “Full Steam Ahead,” in “Leadership” (“The Magazine of the Purdue President’s Council), demonstrates a vision for the place the Wilmeth Active Learning Center will hold in Purdue University’s history.

“Where once a smokestack stood — an iconic symbol of another era — soon a new a structure destined to be equally representative of its historical moment will rise on Purdue’s campus horizon: the [Wilmeth] Active Learning Center.”

The article also describes Libraries Dean Jim Mullins’ vision for the facility:

“The dean was an early and persistent champion of the concept of a new centrally located ‘learning commons’ — integrated with library facilities and services — that will further reinforce Purdue’s national leadership as an innovator in emerging trends in active learning and collaborative study needs. Research shows that library facilities remain the top destination to study for undergraduates at Purdue, Mullins says. And because information literacy is embedded in the new core curriculum, Libraries faculty play a greater role in instructing students how to locate, evaluate and judge information’s accuracy and value.”

Below are more tweets and photos of the #BTAALib17 attendees’ visit to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Mystery items from the former Purdue Power Plant. The view from where these items are located in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center overlooks the Grand Reading Room (and the Tuesday night reception hosted in the room during #BTAALib17).

Mystery items from the former Purdue Power Plant. The view from where these items are located in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center overlooks the Grand Reading Room (and the Tuesday night reception hosted in the room during #BTAALib17).

 

Purdue Libraries Dean Jim Mullins leads one of the tours of Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center during the “Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference.

Purdue Libraries Dean Jim Mullins leads one of the tours of Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center during the “Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference.

 

Sebastian Kenny (or "Kenny" as he likes to be called), a student ambassador in Purdue University Libraries, leads a tour of the Wilmeth Active Learning Center during the “Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference. Kenny and conference attendees are passing by an aerial photograph of the campus from 1934, when both Thomas and Harvey Wilmeth were students at Purdue. (Read more about the Wilmeths at http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2015/Q2/purdue-active-learning-center-named-for-engineering-alumni-wilmeth-brothers.html.) The photograph evokes Purdue’s Land Grant Roots and shows the location of old Power Plant (now where the WALC stands). In its day, the state-of-the-art Power Plant was a point of pride for Purdue and became a symbol for the land grant institution.

Sebastian Kenny (or “Kenny” as he likes to be called), a student ambassador in Purdue University Libraries, leads a May 16 tour of the Wilmeth Active Learning Center during the “Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference. Kenny and conference attendees are passing by an aerial photograph of the campus from 1934, when both Thomas and Harvey Wilmeth were students at Purdue. (Read more about the Wilmeths at www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2015/Q2/purdue-active-learning-center-named-for-engineering-alumni-wilmeth-brothers.html.) The photograph evokes Purdue’s Land Grant Roots and shows the location of old Power Plant (now where the WALC stands). In its day, the state-of-the-art Power Plant was a point of pride for Purdue and became a symbol for the land grant institution.

 

Attendees of the Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference enjoying a reception in the Grand Reading Room of the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Attendees of the Big Ten Academic Alliance Collective Collection: Leveraging a Legacy to Shape Our Shared Future” conference enjoying a reception in the Grand Reading Room of the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

First book shelved in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

First book shelved in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue University Libraries Associate Professor and Head of the Health & Life Sciences Division Vicki Killion placed the first book on a shelf in the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center Monday (May 15) morning.

Purdue University Libraries’ personnel from facilities and faculty and staff from the former separate Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; Physics; and Engineering libraries are working this week to merge the materials into the consolidated library in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

The new building opens to the public Aug. 7.

More information about about the newly consolidated library and new building is available at blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/2017/04/27/walc-move-faqs/.

Below are some photos of the first books moved into the Library of Engineering and Science, as well as a few photos of the inside of the building.

 


Vicki Killion, associate professor in Purdue University Libraries, places the first book on the shelf in the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center at Purdue University.

Vicki Killion, associate professor and head of the Health & Life Sciences Division in Purdue University Libraries, places the first book on the shelf in the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center at Purdue University.

Dan Yeoman and Jacinda Laymon from Libraries Facilities move books into the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Dan Yeoman and Jacinda Laymon from Libraries Facilities move books into the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Victoria Thomas (left) and Sandy Galloway working to organize the books on the shelves in the new Library of Engineering & Science, Purdue University Libraries in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Victoria Thomas (left) and Sandy Galloway working to organize the books on the shelves in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Ralph Mickey (left) and Monica Kirkwood in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. The first books were moved to the newly consolidated library Monday, May 15.

Ralph Mickey (left) and Monica Kirkwood in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. The first books were moved to the newly consolidated library Monday, May 15.

Purdue University students Lashta Saber and Adam Kunkel organizing the books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue University students Lashta Saber and Adam Kunkel organizing the books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Liz Lukens, JJ Carroll, Adam Kunkel, Lashta Saber, and Victoria Thomas shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Liz Lukens, JJ Carroll, Adam Kunkel, Lashta Saber, and Victoria Thomas shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Sandy Galloway (center, front), Robin Meher, and Lil Conarroe shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Sandy Galloway (center, front), Robin Meher, and Lil Conarroe shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Library of Engineering and Science Information Desk in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center

Library of Engineering and Science Information Desk in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

This mural shows the interior of the boiler house (in the former Power Plant) with students learning alongside of workers under the guidance of faculty. This was, perhaps, an early version of active learning that is continued with the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

This mural shows the interior of the boiler house (in the former Power Plant) with students learning alongside of workers under the guidance of faculty. This was, perhaps, an early version of active learning that is continued with the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from the Library of Engineering and Science's information desk in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from the Library of Engineering and Science’s information desk in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center. Computer workstations are being installed during the summer of 2017. The building will open to the public Monday, Aug. 7.

The atrium inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (first floor)

The atrium inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (first floor).

The Reading Room in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from inside the Reading Room in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from one of the large windows inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center's Reading Room.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from one of the large windows inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center’s Reading Room.

The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC)

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” — John F. Kennedy

 

Today and this weekend will be one that is bittersweet for many on the Purdue University campus–and especially so for many in Purdue University Libraries.

Many students are wrapping up their final exams and will soon head home for the summer, leaving their college lives behind for a time. Those who are graduating next week are preparing for commencement and are likely looking toward their new lives in the work world or in advanced degree programs.

And, here in Purdue Libraries, today and tomorrow, we are closing the buildings of six of our libraries–to start the process of the move to the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center (photo above).

The newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, along with the many active learning resources available in the Wilmeth Center, will officially open to the public Monday, August 7.

Information about the individual libraries that are closing, as well as for Purdue Libraries’ users, is just below.


Today (Friday, May 5), the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will close at 5 p.m; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

The libraries that will remain open during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center include:

  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Aviation Technology Library
  • Black Cultural Center
  • Hicks Undergraduate Library
  • Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics
  • Veterinary Medical Library

From May 7-June 11, Purdue Libraries’ users who need materials from the closed libraries can search for and retrieve materials by using the secure Interlibrary (ILL) System or UBorrow. An active Purdue Career ID is required for login. You will be notified when the material you requested is ready for pick up at the ILL Office in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library or is ready for download. For currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars, we deliver the research material you need to your desktop or office quickly and efficiently.

From June 12 through the opening of the WALC (August 7), users will be able to submit requests for the materials located in the closed locations and pick up their materials from an open library of their choosing. After the WALC opens, materials in the closed libraries can still be requested in the Libraries catalog and will be delivered to an open library of their choosing. Office and desktop delivery for currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars will continue.


Here’s to the future, Purdue!

— Teresa Koltzenburg, Director of Strategic Communication