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Posts tagged ‘IMPACT’

Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Faculty Members - IDSI Funding, Second RoundPurdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Faculty Members - IDSI Funding, Second RoundSeven Purdue University Libraries and School of Information (PULSIS) faculty members are part of three of five research teams to receive funding in Purdue University’s second round of research for the Integrative Data Science Initiative (IDSI).

According to the IDSI website, the vision for the initiative is “to be at the forefront of advancing data science-enabled research and education by tightly coupling theory, discovery, and applications while providing students with an integrated, data science-fluent campus ecosystem.”

The three research projects with PULSIS faculty members are also are led by PULSIS faculty as the principal investigators.

The PULSIS projects and researchers are as follows:

  • IMPACT Data Science Education: Preparing Undergraduates to Lead into the Future, Libraries and School of Information Studies and College of Science
    PI: Clarence Maybee, PULSIS; team members: Guang Lin, mathematics statistics and School of Mechanical Engineering; Wei Zakharov, PULSIS, Chao Cai, PULSIS; and Jason Fitzsimmons, Center for Instructional Excellence.
  • Building a Data Science Education Ecosystem Resource Collection, Libraries and School of Information Studies and College of Science
    PI: Pete Pascuzzi, PULSIS; team members: Gladys Andino, research computing; Mark D. Ward, statistics; and Michael Witt, PULSIS.
  • Integrating Geospatial Information Across Disciplines, Libraries and School of Information Studies
    PI: Nicole Kong, PULSIS; team members: Bryan Pijanowski, forestry and natural resources; Jie Shan, civil engineering; Dharmendra Saraswat, agricultural and biological engineering; Songlin Fei, forestry and natural resources; Brady Hardiman, forestry and natural resources; Ian Lindsay, anthropology; Michael Fosmire, PULSIS; Ephrem Abebe, pharmacy practice; Vetria Byrd, computer graphics technology; Guang Lin, data science consulting service; Preston Smith, IT research computing; and Erica Lott, Center for Instructional Excellence.

For more information, visit www.purdue.edu/data-science/education/education-proposals.php.

Courtesy of the American Library Association

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Dr. Clarence Maybee, Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

The Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) of the American Library Association has selected Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Clarence Maybee as the 2019 recipient of the LIRT Librarian Recognition Award. The Librarian Recognition Award was created to recognize an individual’s contribution to the development, advancement, and support of information literacy and instruction.

Since becoming a librarian in 2005, Maybee (who serves as a information literacy specialist at Purdue University) has made rich contributions to the profession through his strong publication and service record, as well as his exemplary record of program creation and dissemination.

His participation in the Purdue University IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation) program — a course-development program through which classroom instructors collaborate with librarians and others to improve their courses through active learning, information literacy, and other research-based educational practices — was particularly noteworthy. The program was named by The Chronicle of Higher Education as a 2018 Innovator, one of “six programs to change classroom culture.”

Closely aligned is his scholarship on informed learning design, which is intended to guide the creation of assignments so that students intentionally learn to use information sources at the same time that they are learning course content. In 2018, he authored the book “IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education.

Maybee has also demonstrated his commitment to the library instruction community through his leadership efforts in both the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Instruction Section and the Immersion Program. His contributions to the development, advancement, and support of information literacy and instruction exemplify the values that LIRT embraces.

“It is a tremendous honor to have received the LIRT Librarian Recognition Award. Throughout my career, I have looked to LIRT to inform my information literacy work as a librarian in higher education,” Maybee noted.

The Library Instruction Round Table was started in 1977 with the intent to bring together librarians who provide library instruction across all types of libraries — academic, public, school, and special libraries. This year marks the sixth year that the Librarian Recognition Award has been awarded.

Visit LIRT’s webpage at www.ala.org/rt/lirt/mission to find out more about LIRT, its mission, and the awards.

The LIRT Librarian Recognition Awards Subcommittee included Beth Fuchs of the University of Kentucky (chair & LIRT awards committee chair), Lore Guilmartin of the Pratt Institute, Yolanda Hood of the University of Prince Edward Island, and Melissa Ann Fraser-Arnott of the Library of Parliament, Canada. The ALA Office for Member Relations (AOMR) serves as the liaison to the Library and Instruction Round Table (LIRT).

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

In Gershwin’s classic “Summertime,” the “livin’ is easy,” and for many who work in education, the summer months may be a bit easier—a time to take a break from the hectic pace of the regular academic year. But many faculty also take advantage of their summer downtime to take part in professional-development activities to advance their skills, hone their expertise, and become better educators for the school year ahead. That is exactly what more than 100 librarians did this summer in the Association of College and Research Libraries’ “Immersion” program.

In 2017, Purdue Libraries Associate Professor Clarence Maybee—who also is the Libraries information literacy specialist—was selected as an instructor for ACRL’s five-day long intensive learning program. The program is designed for those who contribute to the educational role of libraries in higher education.

Maybee is an advisor for IMPACT, or Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation, and he is a zealous advocate for librarians’ roles in higher education. Recently, he authored “IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education,” a book that presents the ways in which academic librarians are making a difference in student learning and success, using IMPACT as an example.

In the short Q&A below, Dr. Maybee talks about the structure and benefits of Immersion and how he uses the opportunity to teach and to learn.

ACRL's Immersion Program 2018: Plenary Session

ACRL’s Immersion Program 2018: Plenary Session

Q: Why is the program called Immersion?

Maybee: Immersion is an intense five-day long experience in which librarians, who support the educational mission of libraries, take a deep dive into exploring and planning for a change in practice they want to take back to their campuses. This year, we sequestered ourselves at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. Each day of the week brought a combination of learning about new ideas, receiving constructive feedback from colleagues, reflecting on what we heard, and working individually. Participants were truly “immersed” in their work—ending the week with a plan for what they want to enact when they get back home.

Q. How was Immersion 2018 structured?

Maybee: The 120 participants were divided up into eight cohorts. The program is built upon four cornerstones: critical reflective practice, design thinking, leadership, and information literacy. Before attending the ACRL Immersion program, participants were asked to identify a “change in practice” they are considering in their educational work. The change in practice could be anything, such as a new lesson, a new approach to teaching overall, or a new communication plan. The first few days of the program focused on introducing participants to new ideas related to each of the four cornerstone concepts. At the end of the week, the participants received peer feedback to help them advance their plans. Many participants told me this was the most useful experience of the week—allowing them to draw many ideas together and see things in a new way! As a teacher, I loved seeing what each group came up with on the last day of the program. On this day, the 15 participants in each of the eight cohorts created a visual representation of what they collectively learned through the week. Yes, there were scissors and colored markers involved!

Q. What was the most Tweetable comment/discussion point from Immersion this year and why?

Maybee: A participant pointed out that the program did not explicitly address the racism that exists in higher education learning environments. She volunteered to give a talk to participants about anti-racist pedagogy. Of course, we took her up on that. She introduced the group to many books that aim to help us see racism in teaching and learning situations and various ways of responding to it! I was so grateful for this participant’s willingness to share her knowledge with us. It was a memorable and important addition to the program.

Q. How do you take what you learned at Immersion and apply it to your work at Purdue?

Maybee: It is a two-way street! Many of the insights I have gleaned from working with Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation (IMPACT) helped me in my efforts to support participants in the Immersion program. Specifically, the techniques we use in working with Purdue instructors to think through pedagogic concerns were particularly applicable to working with Immersion participants. Of course, everyone at Immersion brings so much to the table. When working with the teachers and participants in the program, I am constantly learning innovative pedagogic ideas, which I bring back to my work at Purdue.

Q. How did you feel (and why do you think you felt this way) when the program concluded?

Maybee: Although I was very tired by the end of the week, I took solace in knowing that the participants, having really poured their hearts into their work, were even more exhausted. Everyone worked so hard on thinking through the change in practice each wanted to enact back at his or her institution. At the end of the week, everyone was invigorated—excited to get back home and improve education!

Purdue University Libraries Information Literacy Specialist and Associate Professor Dr. Clarence Maybee’s new book, “IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education,” presents the ways in which academic librarians are making a difference in student learning and success, using Purdue University’s IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation) program as an example.

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Clarence Maybee, Information Literacy Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

Maybee’s book describes how academic libraries can enable the success of higher education students by creating or partnering with teaching and learning initiatives that support student learning through engagement with information.

In his book, the author discusses existing models, extracting lessons from Purdue Libraries’ partnership with other units to create a campus-wide course development program, IMPACT, to provide academic libraries with tools and strategies for working with faculty and departments to integrate information literacy into disciplinary courses.

The text will also helps teachers and students deal with information in the context of a discipline and its specific needs and presents an informed learning approach where students learn to use information as part of engagement with subject content.

To order the book, visit http://bit.ly/2oSMrWx. For more information about the information literacy resources offered by Purdue Libraries, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/infolit.