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Welcome to Database of the Month, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these monthly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This month’s database is S&P NetAdvantage brought to you by S&P Global Inc.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: Standard & Poor’s NetAdvantage, also known as S&P NetAdvantage, provides investment information and analysis on companies, industries, stocks and bonds, mutual funds and dividends. Resources available include: S&P Bond Guides, Earnings Guide, Corporation Records, Industry Surveys, Mutual Funds, S&P Outlook, Register of Corporations, Executives and Directors, S&P Stock Guide and Stock Reports.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of searching S&P NetAdvantage.

Start with this hint: You can easily browse industry or company profiles and find investment research under the Companies tab.

Why you should know this database: S&P NetAdvantage provides access to company profiles, news, investment research, and industry surveys. This database also features a chart builder that makes company comparison easy.

Interested in Company Financials?  

Some other databases you might want to check out, are:

  • Mergent Online, access financial statements, company news, industry analysis and more.
  • PrivCo, premier source for business and financial data on over 30,000 major, non-publicly traded corporations.
  • Thomson One Banker, provides access to comprehensive dataset of public company financial statistics and investment analyst report. Note: this database only work in Internet Explorer.

Database of the Month comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this monthly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

Purdue University Press is pleased to announce that the Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based Learning (IJPBL) has engaged a new co-editor, Xun Ge, to serve the publication alongside journal co-editor Krista Glazewski, associate professor of instructional systems technology at Indiana University.

IJPBL publishes relevant, interesting, and challenging articles of research, analysis, or promising practice related to all aspects of implementing problem-based learning (PBL) in K–12 and post-secondary classrooms.

Dr. Ge is a professor of Instructional Psychology and Technology with the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Oklahoma. She teaches courses related to cognition and instruction as well as instructional design and development for various open learning environments, including problem-based/project-based learning, multimedia learning, game-based learning, and virtual learning communities. Dr. Ge’s primary research interest involves scaffolding students’ complex and ill-structured problem solving and self-regulated learning through designing instructional scaffolds and cognitive tools in problem-based learning environments.  Her recent scholarly inquiry also shows an attempt to extend her work beyond cognition and metacognition to include motivation and epistemic beliefs. Dr. Ge has conducted extensive research in STEAM education in various educational settings, from K–12 to higher education, and she has collaborated with researchers and scholars from diverse disciplines around the world.

“Dr. Ge is an established and well-recognized leader and scholar in a wide range of areas. We are lucky to have her lend her expertise and leadership to IJPBL,” said Dr. Glazewski.

The journal is published twice annually in open access format. To read or submit to the journal, visit the website.

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Ilana Stonebraker

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Ilana Stonebraker

Purdue University Libraries Associate Professor Ilana Stonebraker is among the 10 individuals recognized by the Tippy Connect Young Professionals (TCYP) in the organization’s 2018 TCYP Top 10 Young Professionals Under 40 Award program.

According to TCYP, annually, the organization honors 10 individuals (between 21-39 years old) based on their professional and philanthropic work in the community. Nominations for the recognition program come from the selected individuals’ coworkers, peers, friends, and family in the community.

The individuals selected live in the greater Lafayette community, excel in professional development, demonstrate service and strong leadership skills, and are actively involved in the community. Nominees are then reviewed and ranked by a panel comprised of community leaders, past winners, and peers, notes the TCYP website.

Stonebraker, who is a business information specialist in Purdue Libraries’ Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics, also was recognized recently by the ALA Library Instruction Roundtable (LIRT) as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. In addition, last month, she was inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy for 2018 in recognition of her outstanding and scholarly teaching in graduate, undergraduate, or engagement programs.

Welcome to Database of the Month, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these monthly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This month’s database is ReferenceUSA brought to you by Infogroup.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: ReferenceUSA offers several searchable database modules containing detailed information on more than 14 million U.S. businesses and employers; 89 million U.S. residents; 855,000 U.S. health care providers; 1.5 million Canadian businesses; and 12 million Canadian residents.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of searching ReferenceUSA.

Start with this hint: Search by company name using “Quick Search” feature to find a list of executives or the CEO of a company. When looking at a list of companies, click on the blue arrow to the right to find the corporate office of the company you’re looking for.

Why you should know this database: ReferenceUSA’s U.S. Businesses database is enhanced with more than 24 million phone calls per year and includes company name, business title, business type, sales volume, employee size, year established and more. ReferenceUSA can also be used to find industry profiles, job listings, and competitors.

Interested in Company Directories?  

Some other databases you might want to check out, are:

  • Uniworld, up-to-date multinational business contact information with listings in over 200 countries. Includes information on American firms operating in foreign countries and foreign firms operating in the United States.
  • D&B Business Browser, aggregate database of company, business news, and industry information.
  • Plunkett Research, offers business intelligence, industry trends, statistics, market research, and company lists. Detailed industry reports, company profiles, and numerous statistics are available.

Database of the Month comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this monthly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

Purdue Libraries Professor Jean-Pierre Hérubel

Purdue Libraries Professor Jean-Pierre Hérubel

In May and early June, members of Purdue University Libraries faculty were recognized by internal and external units and organizations for their contributions to research and scholarship, instruction and teaching, and service and engagement. Below is a list of the recognized faculty members and information about their recent honors and awards.

Jean-Pierre Hérubel, professor of library science, was honored with the 2018 ILA/ACRL (Iowa Library Association/Association of College and Research Libraries) Research Award for the article, “Two Sides of the Same Coin? Trade and University Press Publishing of Revised Dissertations, 2007-2016, Some Observations.” The article was co-authored by Edward A. Goedeken, professor of library science, Iowa State University Library.

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Heather Howard

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Heather Howard

Heather Howard, assistant professor and business information specialist, was selected to receive Purdue University’s Teaching for Tomorrow Fellowship Award and will serve as junior fellow for the 2018-19 academic year.

 

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and GIS Information Specialist Nicole Kong

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and GIS Information Specialist Nicole Kong

Nicole Kong, assistant professor and geographic information systems (GIS) specialist, was recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) Library Instruction Roundtable as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. Kong’s and her co-authors’ article, “Spatial Information Literacy for Digital Humanities: The Case Study of Leveraging Geospatial Information for African-American History Education,” appeared in College & Undergraduate Libraries (vol. 24, 2017).

 

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Ilana Stonebraker

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Ilana Stonebraker

Ilana Stonebraker, assistant professor and business information specialist, was recognized by the ALA Library Instruction Roundtable as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. Stonebraker’s and her co-authors’ article, “Realizing Critical Business Information Literacy: Opportunities, Definitions, and Best Practices” appeared in the Journal of Business & Finance Librarianship (vol. 22, 2017).

Stonebraker has also been inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy for 2018 in recognition of her outstanding and scholarly teaching in graduate, undergraduate, or engagement programs. She is the first member of Purdue Libraries faculty to be inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy.

Purdue Univeristy student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

by Teresa Koltzenburg, Purdue Libraries

Purdue University senior Jacob Nolley is in no danger of lacking entrepreneurial ideas and endeavor. Nolley—a dual marketing and management major in the Purdue Krannert School of Management and president of the Purdue Honors College Mentor Council—and his business partner and best friend, Collin Clevenger (who attends Ball State University), have both embodied the entrepreneurial spirit since they were in fourth grade together many years ago. Back then, the Shelbyville (IN) natives started a business selling lollipops and pencil erasers to their elementary-school classmates. The pair’s business partnership continued into their high school years, when they founded a headband business together and sold their headband products to fellow students and friends.

The GripIt Mobile Device Holder

The GripIt mobile device holder

Most recently, Nolley and Clevenger started the product-development venture The Graphite Lab, through which they hope to help other young entrepreneurs take their product ideas to market successfully. As a proof of their product-development company concept, Nolley and Clevenger have developed their very own product, the GripIt, a holder for mobile devices, which they describe as “the most comfortable, customizable, and care-free way to hold your device.” Sleeker (for carrying a device in one’s pocket) than the popular pop-up holders—and still creating a more secure grip on one’s valuable mobile device—GripIt attaches easily to mobile devices (including tablets) and features 16 different band colors. Nolley said, too, those who order GripIt in bulk orders (for giveaways and brand awareness “swag”) will have even more customizable options (e.g., printing the bands and/or more color options).

Recently, the pair launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to help them purchase start-up capital, including a printer so they can make some of the product pieces themselves. But before they could start marketing GripIt (and the services of The Graphite Lab) and launch their Indiegogo campaign, Nolley and Clevenger needed a product prototype to show to prospective investors and to take to manufacturing partners. That’s where the 3D printing resources in the Purdue University Libraries’ Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) proved to be integral. (D-VELoP is part of the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.) After creating a design using OnShape online product-design software, Nolley used D-VELoP’s 3D printing resources and the D-VELoP staff members’ expertise to help him hone the prototype.

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries' Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries' Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries’ Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

“Libraries personnel, like [Instructional Developer] Aly Edmondson helped me a great deal,” Nolley explained. “I talked with her and other D-VELoP personnel about what they would recommend for this particular prototype design. Through this process, I learned how to design a product to be manufactured, as there are lot of different things that need to be implemented in this type of design—one that will be 3D printed and injection molded— for it to work. I went through about 25 iterations before I came to the final prototype design, and every time I sent a design to be 3D printed, I got it back promptly, and they gave me great feedback, which was super helpful,” he added.

Nolley—who is also minoring in creative writing and completed Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—not only credits D-VELoP’s resources and personnel for helping him and his partner get to this point with the start-up The Graphite Lab and the GripIt product, but he also noted that many people, resources, and services at Purdue have been invaluable during his college career.

“No one has helped me more at Purdue than Debbi Bearden, my academic advisor in the Krannert Leaders Academy. She has helped provide me with all the many, wonderful opportunities I have benefited from as a Purdue student. Debbi has made my time at Purdue absolutely the most fruitful experience I have had in my life,” he noted.

Nolley also took advantage of Purdue University’s Foundry, which, according to the Purdue Foundry website, “exists to help Purdue students, faculty, and local alumni move ideas to the marketplace more quickly.”

“My freshman year at Purdue, I founded ‘Jacob’s Loom,’ a start-up project that I ended up closing because of financing problems, which is part of the inspiration for using the crowdfunding approach for Collin’s and my current start-up project,” he explained. “The resources at the Purdue Foundry and the staff there—like Tim Peoples, Purdue Foundry managing director, and John Hanak, managing director of Purdue Ventures—were pivotal in providing me with the skills to be successful with The Graphite Lab and GripIt.”

Nolley also credits his former Purdue instructor Beth Carroll (who now works in the retail sector)—who taught courses in Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—for helping him learn and hone his entrepreneurial knowledge and skills.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

“She is one of the most helpful faculty members I have ever worked with,” Nolley said.

Nolley and Clevenger launched their Indiegogo campaign just this week, and they only have short window, about a month, to get to their fundraising goal of $15,000. The good news is that, as of June 1, they already have close to 100 backers and have raised more than $1,000.

“We used Indiegogo because we wanted to show it is possible that you do not have to sell your ideas and efforts to get your company off the ground. That is what we want to do with our customers of The Graphite Lab,” Nolley explained. “So, when people bring their products to us, we want to help them get their ideas off the ground and sell their products through our sales channels, but we do not want to own their products. Many times, what happens with young entrepreneurs, in order to get their ideas to market, they have to ‘sell their souls to the devil,’ so to speak, and sell off their companies and product-development ideas and efforts. So, in the long term, they do not earn those profits. We want to lead by example, and we are trying to show young entrepreneurs that they do not have to sell their companies and/or ideas. We are providing them with another option through The Graphite Lab.”

For more information, check out the GripIt Indiegogo campaign at www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-gripit-iphone-security#/ and/or contact Nolley at JacobNolley@gmail.com or Clevenger at CollinAClevenger@gmail.com.

 

The Tinkering Humanist Workshop Series sponsored by Purdue University Libraries

Registration for each workshop is required and available online at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6. Please complete one registration form for each workshop you plan to attend.

One of the hallmarks of Digital Humanities is the notion of “tinkering,” of exploring new tools and technologies that faculty and educators can use in their scholarship and teaching. In a series of workshops sponsored by Purdue University Libraries, Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matthew Hannah (based in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education, or HSSE, Library) will introduce you to these new tools and discuss some ways to implement them in your research and pedagogy.

The individual workshop descriptions, with time/date location information, are listed below. All workshops are open free to Purdue University faculty members, students (undergraduate and graduate), and staff members, but registration is required and is available online at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6. Please complete one registration form for each workshop you plan to attend.

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah

Topic Modelling with Voyant Tools

3-4:45 p.m. Wednesday, June 27
Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) 3045

Have you ever wished you could simply press a button and see the major topics of a novel or book of poetry? With this workshop on Voyant Tools, you can easily create topic models of any text. A topic model shows the most frequently used words in any given body of text, which allows scholars and teachers to design interesting and innovative lesson plans. Professor Hannah will begin with a discussion of “data” in the humanities, and he will direct you to some great online resources for accessing the plain text documents you will need for analysis. Workshop participants will then create a topic model of a corpus of poems, including word frequencies, text visualizations, and word tracking. Instructor will provide text to analyze. No technical expertise required. Register (required) at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6.

Social Network Analysis Using Gephi

3-4:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 11
WALC 3045
Social network analysis is one of the growing areas in Digital Humanities research. Scholars and teachers are increasingly looking for easy-to-use software to visualize connections and relationships. In this workshop, you will learn the basic theory behind social network analysis including how to generate and insert data. We will create visualizations of some data provided by the instructor or you can bring your own! We will conclude by considering the pedagogical possibilities of social network analysis for the humanities classroom. No technical expertise required. Register (required) at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6.

Digital Publishing with Scalar

3-4:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 25
WALC 3045
If you have ever wished you could have your students build a multimedia project for your class but weren’t sure how to do it, this workshop is for you! We will discuss the basics of Scalar, a free software platform for innovative digital publishing. With Scalar, you can add photos, text, music, videos, and other media to an essay, creating a hyperlinked rhizomatic publication that fully immerses the reader in a topic through a multitude of media. Even more exciting, Scalar allows you to visualize your materials, and we will consider the ways that adding quantitative data to your project’s benefits or detracts from your work. Because Scalar is so widely adopted by online repositories such as Hathi Trust, you can access the materials in the workshop or bring your own. We will also discuss the pedagogical possibilities for Scalar and look at some sample student projects. Materials needed: digital objects videos, sound files, and pictures. No technical expertise required. Register (required) at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6.

Mapping Time with Timemapper

3-4:45 p.m. Wednesday, August 1
WALC 3045
Timelines are important components of humanities education and research. Whether charting the transmission of knowledge or the march of history, timelines allow us to visualize vast periods of time into easy-to-read infographics. With this workshop, participants will create their own timeline visualizations using Timemapper, a free and accessible timeline software. The skills you learn here will allow you to assign your students new explorations into the humanities and social sciences. No technical expertise required. Register (required) at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6.

Digital Archiving with Omeka

3-4:45 p.m. Wednesday, August 22
WALC 3045

Have you ever wanted to incorporate archival research into your classroom? With Omeka’s free archiving platform, you can assign students to upload content and create their own archives. This easy-to-use platform offers exciting possibilities for your lesson plans, allowing students to explore original material using the Dublin Core metadata standards used by libraries and museums for digital content. In this workshop, we will discuss what Dublin Core is and how to access and use Omeka. Each participant will bring three digital items (music, video, PDFs, texts) to begin creating an original archive, and we will discuss the various metadata categories, as well as the plug-ins, offered by Omeka. Materials needed: 3 digital items. No technical expertise required. Register (required) at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6.

For more information, contact Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

Project Information Literacy's Founder Dr. Alison Head discussing how students conduct research at Purdue University, May 17, 2018.

Project Information Literacy’s Founder Dr. Alison Head discussing how students conduct research at Purdue University, May 17, 2018.

For faculty in academic libraries around the globe, understanding how students use information for school—as well as on into their post-college professional working and personal lives—is gold standard stuff. Over the past decade, Dr. Alison Head and her team of researchers at the non-profit Project Information Literacy (PIL) organization have been diligently contributing to this important standard of information literacy data through ongoing research. Since 2008, Head—the founder and executive director of PIL—and her fellow PIL researchers have interviewed and surveyed more than 16,000 undergraduates at over 88 U.S. four-year public and private universities and colleges and two-year community colleges. PIL has published nine open-access research reports as part of the ongoing project, and the researchers plan to publish a 10th study about college students’ news consumption this fall.

Over the 2017-18 academic year, faculty in Purdue University Libraries have had the benefit of working with Head one on one (virtually) through the PIL’s inaugural Visiting Research Scholar program, a unique professional-development opportunity for faculty and staff in the academic library community. Last summer, Head selected Purdue Libraries as the initial site for the program, after a completing a successful pilot phase at University of Nebraska Library. As part of the wrap-up of the yearlong program at Purdue Libraries, Thursday, she was on campus to present, “How Today’s Students Conduct Research.”

Purdue Libraries Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist, Project Information Literacy Founder Dr. Alison Head, and Information Literacy Instructional Designer Rachel Fundator pose for a photograph at Purdue Libraries' Wilmeth Active Learning Center, home of the Library of Engineering and Science and the Mullins Reading Room.

Purdue Libraries Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist Dr. Clarence Maybee, Project Information Literacy Founder Dr. Alison Head, and Information Literacy Instructional Designer Rachel Fundator pose for a photograph at Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center, home of the Library of Engineering and Science, Mullins Reading Room, and the Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP).

“Purdue Libraries has been the perfect setting for a program like this,” Head explained. “In addition to being known as an innovative and award-winning academic library organization, the opportunity to work individually and collaboratively with the mix of young, excited, and engaged faculty members has been very gratifying for me.”

According to Dr. Clarence Maybee, associate professor and information literacy specialist at Purdue Libraries, bringing in and working with experts such as Head will have long-term results, well beyond the Visiting Scholar program.

“In our educational efforts to teach Purdue learners to use information, Purdue Libraries faculty and staff engage in ‘praxis,’ meaning we apply theory to practice. As a community, we are continually exploring new scholarly ideas. Visits from information literacy scholars, such as Dr. Head, engage Purdue Libraries faculty and staff in the latest research findings and theories, prompting deep discussions of the most effective approaches to information literacy education that we may draw into our efforts at Purdue,” he noted.

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Heather Howard

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Heather Howard

Faculty members like Heather Howard, an assistant professor and librarian in the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics, and David Zwicky, an assistant professor and librarian in the Library of Engineering and Science, described working with Head as “very helpful.”

Purdue Libfraries Assistant Professor David Zwicky

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor David Zwicky

“Dave and I had several phone calls with her while designing some assessment research for the work we do with the Soybean Innovation Competition. We went in with an idea to set up pre- and post-tests for next year, and she talked us through what information we were trying to get and what we wanted to accomplish,” Howard said. “With her guidance, we decided to run mini focus groups this semester with the students who had just completed the competition. We are going to be able to use the information from these focus groups to inform our assessment and instruction next year. She also helped us develop our questions for the focus group to make sure they were on track with our research questions,” she noted.

“She was generous with her time, meeting with us over the phone pretty early in the morning, as PIL is based in California,” Zwicky added.

Purdue Libraries Head of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Education, and Business Division and Associate Professor Erla Heyns

Purdue Libraries Head of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Education, and Business Division and Associate Professor Erla Heyns

“Alison helped me think through the projects, and her extensive research experience allowed me to clarify some details of a couple of my projects. I appreciated her insight, practical advice, and ability to think broadly about the subject of the research,” noted Dr. Erla Heyns, associate professor and Head, Humanities, Social Sciences, Education and Business (HSSE-B) Division of Purdue Libraries.

Although Head and her research team at PIL have plenty on their research “plates”—currently, among the many research projects she is involved in, she’s leading a multidisciplinary team looking into the complex issue of how young adults gather news in today’s world, a study supported by the Knight Foundation and the American Library Association’s largest division, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)—she established the Visiting Research Scholar Program to be able to help individual academic librarian researchers in their own information literacy research projects.

Project Information Literacy Founder Dr. Alison Head discussing how students conduct research at Purdue University, May 17, 2018.

In Project Information Literacy’s ongoing examination of college students’ information-seeking practices and behaviors, the researchers have found that students experience the feelings of fear, dread, and being overwhelmed when it comes to conducting research.

“I think it is imperative for library and information science research to increase and for the overall quality to become more rigorous, so I started the program to begin working with individual researchers, to help them work toward these goals,” Head explained. “For me, most importantly, it keeps me current and provides me with a much wider view of the kind of research being conducted, as well as what kind of research is coming up and the different kinds of methods being used,” Head explained.

Since the program began last summer, Head has met virtually (over the phone and online) with several Purdue Libraries faculty members, both individually and in groups.

“I think one of my favorite things, which was new for us at PIL, was ‘an early researcher’ brown bag discussion via a Google Hangout. In that discussion, we had about 15 young faculty on tenure track, and we talked about how to put together a first research study for publication. I enjoy playing that mentor role for people who are starting out,” Head noted. “In addition, I had conversations with faculty members who have quite good research publication methods and wanted to know, based on conference presentations and what they’re hearing, where they could take their research for their upcoming publication goals.”

Head and her team at PIL will be taking applications in June from academic libraries for second installment of the Visiting Research Scholar Program. She can be contacted at Alison@projectinfolit.org.

Learn more about Project Information Literacy at www.projectinfolit.org.

Purdue University Press is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Clarence Maybee as series editor for Purdue Information Literacy Handbooks.

The series, founded by Dr. Sharon Weiner, promotes evidence-based practice in teaching information literacy competencies through the lens of the different academic disciplines. The content of each volume includes the perspectives of disciplinary experts as well as library and information science professionals. The handbooks apply library and information science theories, pedagogies, and models to information literacy in the context of academic disciplines. Each handbook includes sections that explain the relationship of information literacy to different disciplines; identify relevant theories, pedagogies, and/or models; and relate those to effective practice in information literacy teaching and learning. The handbooks are designed both for librarians engaged in instruction and faculty in the disciplines who are including information literacy in undergraduate and graduate learning.

Purdue University Libraries Associate Professor and Information Literacy Specialist Dr. Clarence Maybee

Dr. Clarence Maybee

Dr. Clarence Maybee is an associate professor and information literacy specialist at Purdue University Libraries. His work focuses on integrating information literacy into curricula using an informed learning approach in which students engage with information as they learn disciplinary content. Dr. Maybee leads the Libraries’ involvement in a campus-wide course development program called Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation (IMPACT). He is on the faculty of the Association of Research & College Libraries’ (ACRL) Information Literacy Immersion, a professional development program for academic librarians. Dr. Maybee graduated with his PhD from Queensland University of Technology in 2015. His dissertation, titled Informed learning in the undergraduate classroom: The role of information experiences in shaping outcomes, received the university’s Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award. He publishes in highly ranked journals, such as Library and Information Science Research and Studies in Higher Education. He presents nationally and internationally on information literacy in higher education. He is the author of the book IMPACT Learning: Librarians at the Forefront of Change in Higher Education, published by Chandos Publishing in 2018.

“I am delighted to serve as the series editor for the Purdue Information Literacy Handbook series published by Purdue University Press. The series strongly contributes to our knowledge of information literacy by exploring how it is understood in disciplinary contexts and offering practical tools for teaching and learning within those contexts,” said Dr. Maybee.

For more information about the Purdue Information Literacy Handbooks series, visit http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/series/purdue-information-literacy-handbooks. To submit a book proposal to the series, e-mail  pupacq@purdue.edu with “Information Literacy submission” in the subject line.

Purdue University Press is the scholarly publishing arm of the University and is a unit within the Purdue University Libraries. Dedicated to the dissemination of scholarly and professional information, the Press selects, develops, and distributes quality resources in several key subject areas for which its parent university is famous, including aeronautics and astronautics, business, technology, engineering education, health, veterinary medicine, and other selected disciplines in the humanities and sciences.The Press is also a partner for university faculty and staff, centers and departments, wishing to disseminate the results of their research.

In order to celebrate National Pet Week we reached out to the editors of our book series, New Directions in the Human-Animal Bond, to ask them a few short questions about the series and their own pets. Both series editors are at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University. Alan Beck, ScD is director of the Center of the Human-Animal Bond and the Dorothy N. McAllister Professor of Animal Ecology; and Marguerite (Maggie) E. O’Haire, PhD is an assistant professor of human-animal interaction in the Department of Comparative Pathobiology.

Q: What pets do you have currently and can you share a few pictures?

 

O’Haire: I have 2 dogs – Milo and Chloe.​ My dogs are both rescues. We recently did the dog DNA testing and Milo is a Beagle/Jack Russel Terrier mix and Chloe is an American Foxhound. Milo is almost 4 years old and Chloe is almost 14 years old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beck:   I now have two dogs, Lili (brown & white) and Luci (black & white); both rescue mutts. Two photos of Lili at two different ages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What inspired you to study/research the human-animal bond?

 

O’Haire: I have always been fascinated by how and why people interact with animals​. I am motivated to bring strong science to an area that has often been underappreciated by the scientific community.

Beck: Growing up in crowded Brooklyn, we had no pets, indeed very few people did. I would walk to the dumps to watch birds and rats. As a graduate student I studied the stray dogs of Baltimore and became fascinated with how people interacted with pets; the interactions changed the behavior and even the health of both the people and pets. I changed my focus of study and soon after moving to Indiana, I joined the ranks of dog owner.

Q: What would you like others to understand about your book series?

 

O’Haire: The New Directions in the Human-Animal Bond series is a great ​venue to translate human-animal bond science into everyday language to reach a broader audience. We love receiving new submissions and look forward to continuing to help bright and innovative scholars share their work through the Purdue University Press.

Beck: The New Directions series begins to capture the many aspects of our relationship with animals, not always what you would like, but all part of the mutual world shared by people and their animals. Of great value, the series allows insights to major facets not always studied but still very important.


 

The New Directions in the Human-Animal Bond series is published by Purdue University Press in collaboration with Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. It expands our knowledge of the interrelationships between people, animals, and their environment. Manuscripts are welcomed on all aspects of human-animal interaction and welfare, including therapy applications, public policy, and the application of humane ethics in managing our living resources.

 


 

 

The staff at the Purdue University Press loves our pets, too! Check out some pictures that we featured last month on National Pet Day!

 

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