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readup2016_newIt’s University Press Week 2016 and this year’s theme is community. University presses have long supported all communities whether they’re local, intellectual, or cultural. Purdue University Press continues to celebrate Indiana’s community with our books and projects featuring hidden stories of Hoosier heroes, Purdue traditions, and Indiana history.

We have decided to highlight books that represent the Purdue and Indiana community in our blog along with our favorite places to read them, for University Press week. It’s a treasure trove of the striking Indiana landscapes, university traditions, and biographies of famous alumni including Official Endorsed Bicentennial Projects celebrating Indiana’s rich heritage.

turkfarmcartoon

Read: A Place Called Turkey Run: A Celebration of Indiana’s Second State Park in Photographs and Words by Daniel P. Shepardson — Official Endorsed Legacy Project
Where: The horticulture garden near Pao Hall.

Read: Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family: A Photo History of Indiana’s Early County Extension Agents by Fredrick Whitford, Neal Harmeyer and David Hovde — Official Endorsed Legacy Project
Where: The Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center where you can read and also explore more Indiana and Purdue history.

Read: Slow Ball Cartoonist: The Extraordinary Life of Indiana Native and Pulitzer Prize Winner John T. McCutcheon of the Chicago Tribune by Tony Garel-Frantzen — Official Endorsed Legacy Project
Where: Enjoy a refreshing cup of coffee and calming atmosphere at a local coffeehouse.

spacewalker_calculatedrisk

Read: Spacewalker: My Journey in Space and Faith as NASA’s Record-Setting Frequent Flyer by Jerry Ross and John Norberg
Where: Take a break near Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering.

Read: Calculated Risk: The Supersonic Life and Times of Gus Grissom by George Leopold — Official Endorsed Legacy Project
Where: Relax on a bench near the Class of 1939 Water Sculpture on Purdue Mall.

bigger-photos_blog

Read: The Deans’ Bible: Five Purdue Women and Their Quest for Equality by Angie Klink
Where:  Curl up by the fireplace in the Purdue Memorial Union on a chilly day.

Read: A University of Tradition: The Spirit of Purdue Second Edition compiled by the Purdue Reamer Club
Where: At Reflection Park next to the Bell Tower.

Read: Just Call me Orville: The Story of Orville Redenbacher by Robert W. Topping
Where: At Hicks Undergraduate Library in the study spaces.

As the holiday seasons begins find all the titles above and many more that represent several forms of community in our Winter Gift Catalog. Purdue University Press will continue to support community. Find out more on current and upcoming projects by following us on Facebook and Twitter and signing up for our Newsletter.

Note: A guest post by Purdue University Press staff member Dianna Gilroy is written as part of University Press Week and the blog tour coordinated by the Association of American University Presses (AAUP). The AAUP requested blog posts today on staff members making good and doing interesting things in their communities. Below, Dianna shares her passion for her work, editing books, and her work with dogs in our community.

I have been happy in my job as a member of the editorial team at Purdue University Press in working mainly on our scholarly books in the humanities, such as the Central European Studies series and Comparative Cultural Studies series, which I love; but also close to my heart is our New Directions in the Human-Animal Bond series, which connects closely to my work outside the press for animal adoption and welfare and has deepened my understanding of the importance of our connections with animals. The series examines all aspects of human-animal interaction and welfare, including animal-assisted therapy, public policy in areas from hoarding to dog parks, and humane ethics. I have marveled at the series’ accounts of the extraordinary relationships between people and animals—the physical and psychological healing abilities of dogs, the treatment of troubled young people through their connections with animals, and the value of animal parks and activities in our neighborhoods.

Afternoons with Puppy relates psychologist Aubrey Fine’s groundbreaking work in using animals to connect to children with, for example, ADHD, afternoons-w-puppy-coverlearning disabilities, or developmental disorders. In the case study of “Charles,” Fine sensed the boy’s feeling of humiliation and isolation, “revealed in a lowering of his head, a reluctance to make eye contact, and a slumping of his shoulders.” He brought in his golden retriever, Puppy, about whom he writes, “I am convinced that she possessed or more readily utilized some innate sense that allows her to respond to clients faster and on a different level than I can. In fact, I’ve learned that nonhuman contact allows for a huge increase in a patient’s comfort level while in the office.”

Fine notes that one strategy he uses in therapy is empathy, something that those of us who live with dogs have recognized in our beautiful friends again and again.

The discussion of animals’ usefulness in assisting those with psychological challenges has been growing recently, but for some time there has been popular and scientific documentation showing that the partnership with animals, especially dogs, facilitates the healing of a variety of physiological problems. Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound is a recent book that grew out of a program in Columbia, Missouri, where community residents went to the local animal shelter weekly for four weeks to walk a shelter dog for one hour. The project has helped over 1000 dogs to get their exercise, improve their leash-walking skills, and improve their socialization and chances at adoption, all the while making the volunteers more physically active themselves. Authors Phil Zeltzman and Rebecca A. Johnson outline a multitude of health and social benefits associated with dog ownership. For example, people who own dogs are healthier than people who don’t and make fewer visits to their doctor; dogs can lower our blood pressure, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels; dog owners are more likely to survive after having a heart attack; dog owners, especially older ones, are more likely to get out with a pet, stay involved with others, and participate in recreational activities; and the presence of dogs makes neighborhoods safer by increasing social interactions and bringing a regular, reassuring presence to the area: it has been shown that people who have a dog with them are viewed by others as more likeable than those without a dog.

Teaming with Your Therapy Dog looks closely at the intimate relationship between therapy-dog handlers and their dogs, and recognizes the need for handlers to be respectful teammates with their dogs. Author Ann Howie notes that being a teammate requires attention to our own behavior, not just our dog’s. She offers those who live with therapy dogs principles of good teamwork and illustrates how they fit with the Therapy Dog’s Bill of Rights. Reviewer Kathy Klotz writes of the importance of these principles: “If we truly care about our dog partners who give themselves so valiantly to this kind of work, we realize that the role of a handler in a therapy team is pivotal. We must protect, advocate, and speak for our dogs, so that they can trust our support in the emotionally challenging situations in which we place them.”

I understand first-hand both the benefits and responsibilities that come with the human-animal relationship. Since I arrived in West Lafayette for graduate school, I have tried to help people understand the joy of dogs and the need to come to the aid of homeless animals. I have served on the board of a newly created dog park in Lafayette, which gives dog lovers in the community a place to meet other like-minded people and give both people and pets a place for fresh air and exercise. The board has also offered free talks at the local library about dog training, dog health issues, and other topics. Our park has been a clear benefit to the neighborhood in which it is located, in the ways that Zeltzman and Johnson describe. Crime has gone down, and the park has hosted many community events since it opened.

I have participated in or led a team in the local “Doggie Dash,” an annual fund-raising event for a no-kill animal shelter. The event raised awareness of the problem of homeless animals and raised several thousand dollars each year for the shelter.

And through the online global community, I have worked on a charity calendar through an online group of dog lovers called the #BTPosse (Border Terrier Posse on Twitter), a group located mainly in the UK but also in the EU, US, Russia, Australia, and New Zealand. Since I started working on the calendar in 2014, we have raised about $25,000 for a UK shelter and animal welfare group. The #BTPosse is a bt-posse-calendarfascinating and endearing community of dogs (and their “staff”) who have their own accounts on twitter and speak to one another as dogs. Terms such as “noms,” “zoomies,” “sunpuddling,” “skwizzels,” “curious ears,” and “BOL” (bark out loud) appear in their conversations, as their “typists” channel the personalities of these charming terriers. The #BTPosse is a unique testament to the joy, hilarity, and wonder of the human-animal bond.

 

Open Access Week is a global celebration to raise awareness of open access in scholarship and research. OA Week is an invaluable chance to connect the global momentum toward open sharingopen_access_logo_plos_white-svg with the advancement of policy changes on the local level. Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

In celebration of Open Access Week, Purdue University Libraries Scholarly Publishing Division, incorporating Purdue University Press and Scholarly Publishing Services, will share throughout the week on social media ways in which we support research and engage with the scholarly community through open access. Our open access resources are made available on Purdue e-Pubs, the open access text repository and publishing platform supported by the Purdue University Libraries. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, or globally via #OAWeek.

JPUR COV_front only.inddThe Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research (JPUR) is a student run publication that showcases the exceptional research accomplished by Purdue students. JPUR publishes research from all undergraduate disciplines. As a leading research institution, Purdue is proud who support students who pursue their passions.

JPUR Volume 6 has recently been published open access online and will soon be available across campus in print. It is now time to begin preparing your submission for Volume 7. The abstract deadline is November 15, 2016 and the final deadline is February 15, 2017. This is a stressful time with research, finals and other projects on your schedule. Here to help are previous JPUR students, Joshua Patel and Weston Phillips. They’re going to discuss their experience with JPUR, it’s benefits and advice for submitting your own research.

Joshua Patel

joshuapatel_2My name is Joshua Patel and I am a junior majoring in Mechanical Engineering. I became involved with my research upon receiving the Perry Undergraduate Scholarship. I worked on optimizing ignition timing and a new type of engine called the Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition Engine (HCCI). From varying the air-fuel ratio, adjusting initial conditions to working with exhaust gas recirculation, many methods were employed to achieve the best results.

“Having my research published has been a great talking point in interviews and with recruiters.”

In addition, being published in a yearly journal shows that you went above and beyond typical student researchers. For students submitting to JPUR, I would advise them to invest extra time in their JPUR submission. Go through multiple revisions; ask your academic advisor to review and edit your piece. Overall, JPUR has given my research a public platform to not only share with the community but improve my technical writing skills.

Weston Phillips

westonphillips_3My name is Weston Phillips. I am a senior at Purdue University majoring in Psychological Sciences while minoring in Forensic Science, Law and Society, and Statistics.  I am hoping to attend graduate school next year to earn my Master’s in Forensic Psychology.  I became involved with my research through admittance into the Statistics Living-Learning Community during my sophomore year at Purdue. I participated in undergraduate research and worked with a mentor. My partner, Peter, and I worked with Dr. Baldwin in the Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences department.  This lead to our joint research and our article in JPUR Volume 6. After publishing with JPUR, I worked on various research projects with professors in the Statistics and Psychology departments.

 

“Having my research published has provided me with valuable experience in the journal submission process and helped me become a better writer. “

My advice to those who wish to submit is to use the JPUR experience as a resume builder and a backbone for future journal submissions.  Overall, I enjoyed the experience with JPUR. I am very happy I was able to be a part of it this year.

***

Deadlines are approaching quickly for submission to volume 7: abstracts are due Nov. 15, 2016 and the final deadline is Feb. 15, 2016. For more help on submitting your abstract check out this video. For additional information visit JPUR’s website and be sure to find JPUR Volume 6 on campus this semester or read it online today.


JPUR is a student-run publication. The journal was established to publish students outstanding research papers from completing faculty-mentored research projects. It functions through a unique partnership with the Purdue University Press, departments of Purdue Libraries, Marketing and Media, the Writing Lab and the Department of English. It is sponsored by the Office of the Provost. JPUR is published annually.

Purdue University Libraries is asking for submissions for the fourth annual “Why I Love Purdue Libraries” video contest.

The contest is open to all current Purdue students on the West Lafayette campus. All entries must be at least one minute but must not exceed three minutes in length. They must follow the complete rules and guidelines outlined here. All submissions will be reviewed and the finalists recommended by the Undergraduate Student Libraries Advisory Council (USLAC) to the dean of libraries for final approval. Award categories are $1,000 for first place, $750 for second place and $500 for third place.

The deadline for submissions is Feb. 1 and winners will be announced in March.

Contest winners will be featured on the Purdue Libraries website and communication channels. Awards are distributed through Purdue’s Division of Financial Aid.

Purdue Federal Credit Union sponsors this contest.

For more information, contact Elaine Bahler at ecbahler@prf.org or visit https://www.lib.purdue.edu/videocontest.

The Purdue University Libraries will continue the Library Scholars Grant Program this year with a focus on supporting access to unique collections of information around the country and the world. Awards of up to $5,000 will be made for this purpose to untenured tenure-track members of the Purdue faculty, and to associate professors tenured effective July 1, 2014, or later. Grant-supported activities must be completed by December 31, 2017. The Library Scholars Grant Program is made possible through the generosity of the 50th anniversary gift of the Class of 1935, and continuing gifts from this class and others, to an endowment fund in the Purdue Research Foundation.

The Library Scholars Grant Program is designed to provide grants to untenured tenure-track Purdue faculty members, and recently tenured or hired associate professors, to help them gain access to library materials necessary for research required for their continued growth as faculty members. Just as people come to Purdue to use our unique collections, the research of Purdue faculty may require visiting unique collections beyond Purdue. The Library Scholars Grant Program offers an opportunity for support for such activities to untenured tenure-track members of the Purdue faculty, and to Purdue associate professors tenured effective July 1, 2014, or later, in all disciplines, from the West Lafayette, Fort Wayne, IUPUI, and Northwest campuses, and the Statewide Technology Program. (Purdue faculty at the Fort Wayne and IUPUI campuses are those within “Purdue mission” programs; i.e., those for whom the promotions process falls under Purdue.)

Each Library Scholars Grant recipient will be asked to present a seminar about the information-related activities supported by the grant. The seminars will permit the Libraries to learn from recipients’ experiences in order to better serve both Purdue scholars and those from outside Purdue who visit our collections.

The 2016-2017 Library Scholars Grant Program awards will be in amounts of up to $5,000. The funds may be used for expenses associated with travel to archives or collections beyond Purdue, including the cost of transportation, lodging, meals, and fees charged by the library or other collection owner for access, photocopying, scanning, etc. Reimbursement will be made, for approved expenditures, up to the amount of the award.

Criteria used to judge the proposals will include how well the case is made that the proposed information-related activities will support the candidate’s research and that conducting these activities requires travel to unique collections beyond Purdue, the appropriateness of the budget, and the feasibility of the project within time constraints. Applicants are required to have a conversation with a librarian who must write a letter of support for a proposal. Proposals will be evaluated by a panel chaired by a tenured member of the Libraries faculty and composed of tenured faculty and one or more previous winners, with recommendations made to the Dean of Libraries. Award recipients will be contacted in January 2017.

The guidelines for proposals are outlined below.

All proposals must be submitted by email to Aimee McComb, mccomba@purdue.edu, with the Subject: Library Scholars Grant, no later than 5:00pm EST, Friday, November 11, 2016.

 

Guidelines for Proposals

Overview

The Library Scholars Grant Program, administered by the Purdue University Libraries, focuses on supporting access for untenured tenure-track members of the Purdue faculty, and associate professors tenured effective July 1, 2014, or later, to unique collections of information found around the country and the world. Awards of up to $5,000 will be made to for this purpose, with grant-supported activities to be completed by December 31, 2017.

The Library Scholars Grant Program is designed to provide grants to untenured tenure-track Purdue faculty members, and recently tenured or hired associate professors, to help them gain access to library materials necessary for research required for their continued growth as faculty members. Just as people come to Purdue to use our unique collections, the research of Purdue faculty may require visiting unique collections. The Library Scholars Grant Program offers an opportunity for untenured tenure-track faculty and recently tenured associate professors to receive support for expenses associated with travel to archives or collections beyond Purdue, including the cost of transportation, lodging, meals, and fees charged by the library or other collection owner for access, photocopying, scanning, etc.

Eligibility

Untenured tenure-track Purdue faculty members, and recently tenured or hired associate professors effective July 1, 2014, or later, in all disciplines, from the West Lafayette, Fort Wayne, IUPUI, and Northwest campuses, and the Statewide Technology Program are eligible for Library Scholars Grant Program awards. (Purdue faculty at the Fort Wayne and IUPUI campuses are those within “Purdue mission” programs; i.e., those for whom the promotions process falls under Purdue.) Grant recipients are not eligible for an award in consecutive years.

Proposal contents and format

1) Cover page with the following information:

  1. a) Name
  2. b) Rank, title
  3. c) Date of appointment to the Purdue faculty; if Associate, date of promotion (if hired as Associate, please amend date of appointment with this information to clarify)
  4. d) Department
  5. e) College
  6. f) Campus address
  7. g) E-mail
  8. h) Phone number
  9. i) Name and address of Head of Department
  10. j) Name and address of Dean of College/School
  11. k) Name of Purdue Libraries faculty member or other Purdue Librarian from whom the applicant is submitting a letter of support (see #4)
  12. l) Total amount of funding the applicant seeks from the Library Scholars Grant Program
  13. m) Additional funding (grants, departmental funds, etc.), if any, available to the applicant to support the information-related activities for which a Library Scholars Grant is being sought

2) One-page narrative stating the following:

  1. a) Area of research;
  2. b) Related information needs that require using collection(s) beyond Purdue;
  3. c) Information-related activities to be undertaken

(Note: The award may be used for expenses associated with travel to archives or collections beyond Purdue, including the cost of transportation, lodging, meals, and fees charged by the library or other collection owner for access, photocopying, scanning, etc.);

  1. d) Projected timeline; and
  2. e) Expected outcome(s) of the information-related activities, i.e., how they would support the applicant’s research.

3) Budget, itemizing proposed activities and their estimated costs, and showing total.

The following websites should be used to estimate lodging, meals and incidentals.

— For U.S. General Services Administration – Domestic destinations:

http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/105307

— For U.S. Dept. of State — Foreign destinations:

http://aoprals.state.gov/content.asp?content_id=184&menu_id=81

4) Letter of support from a Purdue Libraries faculty member, or other Purdue librarian, with whom applicant has consulted regarding the information needs and information–related activities reflected in the proposal. In the letter, the librarian should briefly state the reasons the applicant cannot meet the information needs by using Purdue collections and electronic information resources and, therefore, needs to travel to unique collections beyond Purdue.

5) Brief resume (3 pages maximum).

6) List of publications

Reporting requirements

A brief report or presentation on the information-related activities accomplished as a result of the award, and their significance to the research of the recipient, must be sent to the Dean of Libraries by February 15, 2018.  Additionally, each individual awarded a Library Scholars Grant will be asked to present a seminar about the activities supported by the grant. The seminars will permit the Libraries to learn from recipients’ experiences in order to better serve both Purdue scholars and those from outside Purdue who visit our collections.

Funding

Awards will be in given in amounts of up to $5,000, with reimbursement, for approved expenditures, up to the amount of the award.  The Libraries Business Office will coordinate reimbursement with the grant recipient’s business manager.  Expenses may be reimbursed as they occur over the course of the project, with grant-supported activities to be completed by December 31, 2017. All requests for reimbursement, accompanied by appropriate documentation, must be received in the grant recipient’s departmental business office no later than February 15, 2018.

Criteria for judging proposals

Criteria used to judge the proposals will include how well the case is made that the proposed information-related activities will support the applicant’s research and that conducting these activities requires travel to unique collections beyond Purdue, the appropriateness of the budget, and the feasibility of the project within time constraints. Proposals will be evaluated by a panel chaired by a tenured member of the Libraries faculty and composed of tenured faculty and one or more previous winners, with recommendations made to the Dean of Libraries. Award recipients will be contacted in January 2017.

Proposal deadline

All proposals must be submitted by email to Aimee McComb, mccomba@purdue.edu, with the Subject: Library Scholars Grant, no later than 5:00pm EST, Friday, November 11, 2016.

Questions should be submitted to Aimee McComb, Office of the Dean, Purdue University Libraries – ADMN, email: mccomba@purdue.edu; telephone: 765-494-2900; fax: 765-494-0156

9781557537560Dan Shepardson is a Geoenvironmental and Science Education professor at Purdue University. He has over 80 journal publications and his photography has been featured in national magazines, regional publications, local newsletters and is on permanent display at the Lilly Nature Center. His work is also part of the Photos for Health series on display in area hospitals. In his newest work, A Place Called Turkey Run, Dan combines his passion for photography, nature and the environment.

A Place Called Turkey Run: A Celebration of Indiana’s Second State Park in Photographs and Words  is an Official Endorsed Legacy Project by Indiana’s Bicentennial Commission.  The books captures the park’s striking scenery in hundreds of full-color photos. It takes readers on a vivid journey through the beloved state park during its hundredth anniversary. Learn Shepardson’s motivation and inspiration for the book in our Q&A below.

What inspired your love of nature and photography?

My love of nature and photography may be traced back to my parents. As a kid we would spend time hiking, camping, and fishing and so my parents introduced me and my sister to the natural world. They also bought me a 120 Instamatic camera that I used to take photographs of nature. But it was probably our first family trip to Yellowstone National Park that instilled in me a lifelong interest in nature and nature photography.

What made you want to photograph Turkey Run?

Turkey Run is an amazing state park. Its bluffs and canyons are unique for this part of the country and so it offers the nature photographer and hiker opportunities to see and photograph nature that do not exist in the area.

Why did you decide to create this book? Why did you decide to create it now?

Over the years Turkey Run has provided me with many enjoyable experiences hiking and photographing nature. In 2014 I realized that 2016 was the 100th anniversary of Turkey Run as a state park. I wanted to give something back to the park for all of the experiences it had provided, and I wanted to celebrate its natural history. So I decided to create a photograph and natural history book to honor and celebrate the beauty that is Turkey Run.

Virginia BluebellsHow did you decide what to photograph?

Over the years I tried to photograph the more interesting and unique features that make up the geology and ecology (natural history) of Turkey Run. So in a sense, Turkey Run’s scenery determined what I would photograph. Other times I would take trips, hikes, to photograph specific situations or events, such as the Virginia Bluebells in spring and freshly fallen snow in winter.

The book is divided into 6 sections; how did you choose this breakdown?

After randomly looking at several of my thousands of photographs of the park and thinking about my park experiences I quickly identified the six chapters that I felt captured my experiences and the natural history (geology and ecology) of Turkey Run: Sandstone, Bluffs and Canyons, Flowing Water, Snow and Ice, Tall Trees, Flowers, Ferns and Fungi. 

Shep Fav Photos

Do you have a favorite photo?

I have several. It is difficult to select just one.  I like the Chapter 6 cover photo of the trilliums and the photo of the mayapple on page 170.  The fogged lens photo of flowing water on page 62. The photo on page 4 contrasts the living and nonliving and the crossbed deposition to today’s sand deposition in the creek below. Just to identify a few.

 

 

Is there anything that shocked or surprised you while working on this project?

No, not really. But it is always wonderful to see the spring bloom of wildflowers, the colors of fall, and the snow and ice of winter. I am always astounded by this amazing display of nature. It is always thrilling to see bald eagles soar over Sugar Creek or turkey vultures roosting in tree tops.

What did you learn from this experience?

I guess, what I learned is that Turkey Run is an even more amazing place then I initially realized. The more I experienced and photographed the park over the years the more I came to know and appreciate the natural heritage and beauty that is preserved and protected in the park. Unfortunately, I also learned that people litter. I was stunned by the number of plastic water bottles that are thrown along the side of the trail. It shows no respect for the natural world. It also impairs the experience of other hikers.


Photographing Turkey Run

Enjoy more of Shepardson’s photos as A Place Called Turkey Run becomes available this month. See the beauty of the park up close and personal. Discover Dan’s tips and techniques in the companion book Photographing Turkey Run: A Guide to Nature Photography.  It is designed to provide a basic understanding of how to take pictures of nature and improve one’s photographs.

WHAT IS THE PARRISH CASE COMPETITION?

In order to bring more attention to business information literacy inside and outside of Krannert, the Parrish Library is hosting its third annual case competition for undergraduates. This case competition will be marketing and strategy focused and includes students from Purdue University, University of Notre Dame, Indiana University and new this year, Butler University.

First place $500 Second place $300 Third place $100

HOW DO I SIGN UP?

Registration will be open after September 14.

WHO CAN DO THE PARRISH CASE COMPETITION?

This case competition is open to all undergraduate students regardless of major. The teams should be 4-5 students. At Purdue, at least one student should have taken MGMT 175, GS 175 or MGMT 190. For Butler, Notre Dame and IU, please check your local requirements. Two of the students need to be freshmen or sophomore level (doesn’t have to be the same as MGMT 175 participant). This case competition is intended to be a “lower division” case competition.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE PARRISH LIBRARY CASE COMPETITION?

Callouts: Monday October 3, 6pm Kran 250

Wednesday October 12, 6pm Kran 250

Tuesday October 18, 6pm Kran 250 Teams Formation Deadline and Case Presentation: Wednesday, October 19th. First Round Executive Summaries Due: October 26th (Submitted online)

Final Round Announced: Tuesday Nov. 1 Final Presentations: Saturday, November 5, 1pm-5pm, Open to Public (Burton Morgan 121)

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is IBISWorld, specifically Procurement Reports, brought to you by IBISWorld Inc.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: IBISWorld is an industry research database, meaning that it has information about collections of companies who compete for the same consumer. Information is provided on over 700 US Industries in the US economy in reports at the granular level covering industry-specific titles from the popular to the not so popular.

Search: First time users are encouraged to scroll through all reports or use the search bar to search the reports. 

Click here to see the basics of searching IBISWorld Procurement Reports or try our Guide on the Side with this link

Why you should know this database: IBISWorld Procurement Reports is a recent addition to our library collection. This is a collection of over 900 reports on indirect purchasing lines and products. These reports cover many different markets ranging from “fire doors” and “data mining services” to “explosives” and “language schooling.”

Why students should know this database: IBISWorld Procurement Reports show information on pricing environments, including key trends and forecasts, product characteristics, supply chain vendors, and purchasing process. The information included in these reports are useful to procurement offices, entrepreneurs, and anyone working with products or a client. 

Cost: IBISWorld costs $18,709 paid annually by Purdue Libraries, IBISWorld Procurement Reports costs an additional $4,950 annually.

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

 

 

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is IBISWorld, specifically Industry Reports, brought to you by IBISWorld Inc.  

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password. Focus: IBISWorld is an industry research database, meaning that it has information about collections of companies who compete for the same consumer. Information is provided on over 700 US Industries in the US economy in reports at the granular level covering industry-specific titles from the popular to the not so popular.

Search: Search IBISWorld Industry Reports by keyword, company, code, or browse report listings. 

Click here to see the basics of searching IBISWorld Industry Reports or try our Guide on the Side with this link.

Why you should know this database: IBISWorld Industry Reports include information such as industry definitions, supply chain, major players, performance, outlook, products and markets, major companies, and key statistics. Each Industry Report is 35-50 pages in length with abridged, 6-page Executive Summaries.

Why students should know this database: IBISWorld Industry Reports also include Additional Resources, Industry Jargon, and Glossary sections which can be useful for students new to researching industries. IBISWorld has also created extensive video tutorials for users looking for in-depth knowledge on how to use some of the elements provided in these reports.

Cost: IBISWorld costs $18,709 paid annually by Purdue Libraries. 

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.