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Get A G.R.I.P. (Graduate.Research.Information.Portal): An information portal for graduate students about the services and resources available at Purdue University Libraries. GRIP and Research Data Services has partnered with the Graduate School to offer data services related sessions for graduate students.  These are denoted below by “GSDS” before the session title.  For more information on G.R.I.P. go to: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/grip.

 

Upcoming G.R.I.P. Workshops:

 

EndNote Desktop

Feb. 11, 2016

10 – 11 am

Purdue Graduate Student Center 105b

Presenter:  Nastasha Johnson

 

EndNote Desktop

Feb. 11, 2016

3-4 pm

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenter:  Nastasha Johnson

 

GSDS: Data Management Planning and Funder Requirements

March 01, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 AM

Purdue Graduate Student Center

Presenter: Dr. Line Pouchard

 

Zotero

March 2, 2016

3-4 pm

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenters:  Dave Zwicky & Catherine Fraser Riehle

 

GSDS: Managing Professional Identity

March 08, 2016

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

Purdue Graduate Student Center

Presenter: Associate Professor Megan Sapp Nelson

 

Excel for Data Management

March 31, 2016

10-11 am

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenter:  Pete Pascuzzi

 

GSDS: Publishing with PURR     

April 12, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

HSSE 142/145

Presenter: Professor D. Scott Brandt /Associate Professor Michael Witt

 

EndNote Basic

April 13, 2016

10-11 am

PGCS 105b

Presenter:  Dave Zwicky

 

EndNote Basic

April 13, 2016

3-4 pm

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenter:  Amy Van Epps

 

GSDS: Data Management and Sharing Human Subject/ Participant Research

April 19, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

Purdue Graduate Student Center

Presenter: Dr. Kendall Roark

 

GSDS: Excel Workshop 

April 20, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

Learning Lab: KRAN 250/ Corporate Study Rm KRAN 258/260

Presenter: Dr. Pete Pascuzzi

 

As part of the Libraries annual review of databases, JobNow has been recommended for cancellation by the subject specialist librarians. Access will cease March 14, 2016. Please contact Anna Seiffert, Electronic Resources Manager, with comments.

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is OneSource brought to you by Infogroup.

Our subscription to OneSource has recently changed to include access to over 40 million company records! Some of the highlights include:

  • China increases from 1 million to 2.7 million records
  • India increases from 425,000 to 1.2 million records
  • Spain, France, Italy, Russian Federation, Brazil and Japan all have more than 1 million records
  • Australia increased to 400,000 records

This is the first in a series of OneSource Solutions content enhancements that we will be implementing in the coming months, so stay tuned!

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: OneSource has international coverage of companies, executives, and industries, as well as articles and news.

Search: From the OneSource home page you can do quick searches in the four areas covered – Companies, Executives, News, and Industries. Once you have your results you can use the OneStop Report feature to find specific financial statements and reports. The home page also allows you to Build a List of executives based on job title, industry, size of company, or geographic location.

Click here to see the basics of searching OneSource or try our Guide on the Side with this link.

Why you should know this database: OneSource includes private companies. Our subscription covers 4.7 million companies and 12.5 million executives. OneSource has recently increased there worldwide company data with the implementation of 6.5 million additional company records.

Why students should know this database: OneSource continually strives to evaluate improve their database providing sought elements of company and industry information such as SWOT, list of competitors, analyst reports, and company histories. The most recent expansion will bring the total company records to 33 million.

Cost: $18,200.00 paid by the Libraries annually.

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu.  Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu

Ambrosedig

Title: Ambrose Digital

PURL: http://purl.lib.purdue.edu/db/ambrosedigital

A continually growing collection of 575 videos, all closed captioned, and spanning many subject areas (particularly arts, humanities, and sciences).  Watch all 37 BBC Shakespeare plays!

Romanticism

Title: Romanticism: Life, Literature and Landscape

PURL: http://purl.lib.purdue.edu/db/rom

Take a moment to browse the rich collection of fine art pieces which include works by such eminent artists as J.M.W. Turner, John Constable and Benjamin Robert Haydon. This evocative collection vividly brings to life the landscape that inspired literary creativity and poetic genius.

 

 

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is Web of Science brought to you by Thomson Reuters.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: Web of Science is a citation index to research data, books, journals, proceedings, publications and patents.

Search: Web of Science includes content from scholarly literature of social sciences, science, art, and humanities. Web of Science allows users to search by several categories such as topic, author, and editor. Additional search fields can be added to limit the search and get the best results. The home page features link to Journal Citation Reports, EndNote, and tools to set up alerts.

Click here to see the basics of searching Web of Science, or try our Guide on the Side with this link.

Why you should know this database: Web of Science provides full text to most of the articles that meet your search parameters, with others available through Interlibrary Loan.

 

Why students should know this database: Web of Science features high quality, multidisciplinary, subject-specific search results along with analysis tools to help identify trends and patterns.

 

Cost: For annual subscription information, contact parrlib@purdue.edu

 

 

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu.  Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

 

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu

Note: This was originally posted on January 27, 2016, by George Leopold, author of the forthcoming book Calculated Risk: The Supersonic Life and Times of Gus Grissom on his personal blog. View the original posting here. Re-posted with permission of the author.

On this date in 1967, a few ticks past 6:31 p.m. EST, a blowtorch fire erupted in the crew cabin of the Apollo 1 spacecraft during a launch pad test at Cape Canaveral, Florida, The spacecraft was pressurized with pure oxygen, the cockpit filled with flammable materials. All it took was a spark, almost certainly originating in faulty, exposed wiring.

The astronauts never had a chance.

Commander Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom and crew members Edward H. White, Jr., and Roger B. Chaffee were asphyxiated despite struggling to the last to remove a heavy cork-like inner hatch. A fire was the last thing anyone expected during what was considered a “routine” test. It was anything but. Years of poor engineering decisions came home to roost on that fateful Friday evening.

The Apollo 1 tragedy would prove to be a critical turning point in the Space Race, forcing NASA to take a long, hard look at itself and the way it operated. A series of miscalculations beginning in the early 1960s had doomed the crew of the maiden Apollo flight.

Paradoxically, a preventable tragedy also ensured that the United States would reach the moon by the end of the decade as it had publicly proclaimed. The United States would not have reached the moon without the sacrifice of Grissom, White and Chaffee. The Apollo spaceship was completely overhauled, carrying 24 humans to the moon.

grissom_catwalk

Commander Gus Grissom leads his crew across a catwalk connecting the Pad 34 service tower to his Apollo 1 spacecraft on the morning of a fateful “plugs-out” test on January 27, 1967. (Source: NASA)

A central tenet of the early days of manned spaceflight was the assumption of risk while at the same time doing everything possible to limit it. This is how test pilots worked, and Gus Grissom was among the best military test pilots and aeronautical engineers before becoming one of the original Mercury astronauts. Grissom was among those who decided the rewards of spaceflight were worth the risk.

That calculated risk is the central theme of my forthcoming biography of Gus Grissom, the first human to fly twice in space. The stories of Glenn, Armstrong and the other heroes deemed to possess “The Right Stuff” are well known. Less well known are the lasting contributions and ultimate sacrifice made by Gus Grissom to reach another world. As the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 1 fire approaches, we seek to tell the full story of the life and career of a determined astronaut who shunned the limelight while laying the foundation for visiting another world.

 

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — A former Purdue dean of women has been recognized for her many contributions to U.S. history by the National Women’s History Project as one of 16 national honorees for 2016. The NWHP theme for the honorees is, “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government.”

Dorothy C. Stratton served as Purdue’s first full-time dean of women from 1933 to 1946. She took a leave of absence during World War II to organize and direct the Women’s Reserve of the U.S. Coast Guard, where she achieved the rank of captain and gave the unit its name, SPARS (short for “Semper Paratus,” the Coast Guard’s motto, and its English translation, “Always Ready”). She received the Legion of Merit for her contributions to women in the military.

In 1947, she became director of personnel for the International Monetary Fund and later served as the executive director of the Girl Scouts of America. In 2010, first lady Michelle Obama christened the USCGC Stratton in memory of Stratton’s achievements. She died in 2006 at the age of 107.

Angie Klink, Purdue graduate and author of “The Deans’ Bible: Five Purdue Women and their Quest for Equality,” which features Stratton, said she nominated her because few people knew of Stratton’s accomplishments and contributions to U.S. history.

Her photo will appear on a poster, bookmark and a story in the NWHP Gazette, all of which will be available for purchase online. A lunch and program March 19 in Washington, D.C., will celebrate the honorees.

Stratton’s time at Purdue is preserved in the Susan Bulkeley Butler Women’s Archives. The archives are part of the Purdue University Libraries Archives and Special Collections and memorialize the legacy of the women who helped shape the university and the state of Indiana. Visit http://collections.lib.purdue.edu/womens-archives/ for more information.

Visit http://collections.lib.purdue.edu/womens-archives/quest-for-equality/ for more information or to purchase Klink’s book, “The Deans’ Bible: Five Purdue Women and their Quest for Equality.”

Writer: Megan Huckaby, 765-496-1325, mhuckaby@purdue.edu

Source: Angie Klink, 765-426-1164, aklink@nlci.com

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is IBISWorld, from IBISWorld Inc.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: IBISWorld provides access to domestic and global industry reports.

Search: From the home page of IBISWorld you can search by keyword, company, or code. A keyword search for a company will generate a list of all the industry reports, risk ratings reports, and business environment reports that name that company.

Click here to see the basics of searching IBISWorld, or try our Guide on the Side with this link.

Why you should know this database: IBISWorld provides thoroughly researched, accurate, and current business information on more than 700 of America’s industries. Reports are organized so that information such as Products & Markets, Major Companies, and Operating Conditions can easily be found within each report.

Why students should know this database: IBISWorld includes an “Industry Definition” for each report. This is a helpful feature because each industry database might define a certain industry differently than another database. IBISWorld also provides a Supply Chain section for each report that lists Key Economic Drivers, Supply Industries, and Related Industries.

Cost:  $17,650, an academic subscription paid by the Libraries annually.

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu

JSTOR Global Plants Title

 

 

 

 

NEW PURDUE LIBRARIES RESOURCE: JSTOR Global Plants

URL: http://purl.lib.purdue.edu/db/jstorplants

DESCRIPTION: Global Plants is the world’s largest database of digitized plant specimens and a locus for international scientific research and collaboration.