Hours  |   My Account  |   Ask a Librarian Get Help Give to the Libraries

9781557537560Dan Shepardson is a Geoenvironmental and Science Education professor at Purdue University. He has over 80 journal publications and his photography has been featured in national magazines, regional publications, local newsletters and is on permanent display at the Lilly Nature Center. His work is also part of the Photos for Health series on display in area hospitals. In his newest work, A Place Called Turkey Run, Dan combines his passion for photography, nature and the environment.

A Place Called Turkey Run: A Celebration of Indiana’s Second State Park in Photographs and Words  is an Official Endorsed Legacy Project by Indiana’s Bicentennial Commission.  The books captures the park’s striking scenery in hundreds of full-color photos. It takes readers on a vivid journey through the beloved state park during its hundredth anniversary. Learn Shepardson’s motivation and inspiration for the book in our Q&A below.

What inspired your love of nature and photography?

My love of nature and photography may be traced back to my parents. As a kid we would spend time hiking, camping, and fishing and so my parents introduced me and my sister to the natural world. They also bought me a 120 Instamatic camera that I used to take photographs of nature. But it was probably our first family trip to Yellowstone National Park that instilled in me a lifelong interest in nature and nature photography.

What made you want to photograph Turkey Run?

Turkey Run is an amazing state park. Its bluffs and canyons are unique for this part of the country and so it offers the nature photographer and hiker opportunities to see and photograph nature that do not exist in the area.

Why did you decide to create this book? Why did you decide to create it now?

Over the years Turkey Run has provided me with many enjoyable experiences hiking and photographing nature. In 2014 I realized that 2016 was the 100th anniversary of Turkey Run as a state park. I wanted to give something back to the park for all of the experiences it had provided, and I wanted to celebrate its natural history. So I decided to create a photograph and natural history book to honor and celebrate the beauty that is Turkey Run.

Virginia BluebellsHow did you decide what to photograph?

Over the years I tried to photograph the more interesting and unique features that make up the geology and ecology (natural history) of Turkey Run. So in a sense, Turkey Run’s scenery determined what I would photograph. Other times I would take trips, hikes, to photograph specific situations or events, such as the Virginia Bluebells in spring and freshly fallen snow in winter.

The book is divided into 6 sections; how did you choose this breakdown?

After randomly looking at several of my thousands of photographs of the park and thinking about my park experiences I quickly identified the six chapters that I felt captured my experiences and the natural history (geology and ecology) of Turkey Run: Sandstone, Bluffs and Canyons, Flowing Water, Snow and Ice, Tall Trees, Flowers, Ferns and Fungi. 

Shep Fav Photos

Do you have a favorite photo?

I have several. It is difficult to select just one.  I like the Chapter 6 cover photo of the trilliums and the photo of the mayapple on page 170.  The fogged lens photo of flowing water on page 62. The photo on page 4 contrasts the living and nonliving and the crossbed deposition to today’s sand deposition in the creek below. Just to identify a few.

 

 

Is there anything that shocked or surprised you while working on this project?

No, not really. But it is always wonderful to see the spring bloom of wildflowers, the colors of fall, and the snow and ice of winter. I am always astounded by this amazing display of nature. It is always thrilling to see bald eagles soar over Sugar Creek or turkey vultures roosting in tree tops.

What did you learn from this experience?

I guess, what I learned is that Turkey Run is an even more amazing place then I initially realized. The more I experienced and photographed the park over the years the more I came to know and appreciate the natural heritage and beauty that is preserved and protected in the park. Unfortunately, I also learned that people litter. I was stunned by the number of plastic water bottles that are thrown along the side of the trail. It shows no respect for the natural world. It also impairs the experience of other hikers.


Photographing Turkey Run

Enjoy more of Shepardson’s photos as A Place Called Turkey Run becomes available this month. See the beauty of the park up close and personal. Discover Dan’s tips and techniques in the companion book Photographing Turkey Run: A Guide to Nature Photography.  It is designed to provide a basic understanding of how to take pictures of nature and improve one’s photographs.

WHAT IS THE PARRISH CASE COMPETITION?

In order to bring more attention to business information literacy inside and outside of Krannert, the Parrish Library is hosting its third annual case competition for undergraduates. This case competition will be marketing and strategy focused and includes students from Purdue University, University of Notre Dame, Indiana University and new this year, Butler University.

First place $500 Second place $300 Third place $100

HOW DO I SIGN UP?

Registration will be open after September 14.

WHO CAN DO THE PARRISH CASE COMPETITION?

This case competition is open to all undergraduate students regardless of major. The teams should be 4-5 students. At Purdue, at least one student should have taken MGMT 175, GS 175 or MGMT 190. For Butler, Notre Dame and IU, please check your local requirements. Two of the students need to be freshmen or sophomore level (doesn’t have to be the same as MGMT 175 participant). This case competition is intended to be a “lower division” case competition.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE PARRISH LIBRARY CASE COMPETITION?

Callouts: Monday October 3, 6pm Kran 250

Wednesday October 12, 6pm Kran 250

Tuesday October 18, 6pm Kran 250 Teams Formation Deadline and Case Presentation: Wednesday, October 19th. First Round Executive Summaries Due: October 26th (Submitted online)

Final Round Announced: Tuesday Nov. 1 Final Presentations: Saturday, November 5, 1pm-5pm, Open to Public (Burton Morgan 121)

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is IBISWorld, specifically Procurement Reports, brought to you by IBISWorld Inc.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: IBISWorld is an industry research database, meaning that it has information about collections of companies who compete for the same consumer. Information is provided on over 700 US Industries in the US economy in reports at the granular level covering industry-specific titles from the popular to the not so popular.

Search: First time users are encouraged to scroll through all reports or use the search bar to search the reports. 

Click here to see the basics of searching IBISWorld Procurement Reports or try our Guide on the Side with this link

Why you should know this database: IBISWorld Procurement Reports is a recent addition to our library collection. This is a collection of over 900 reports on indirect purchasing lines and products. These reports cover many different markets ranging from “fire doors” and “data mining services” to “explosives” and “language schooling.”

Why students should know this database: IBISWorld Procurement Reports show information on pricing environments, including key trends and forecasts, product characteristics, supply chain vendors, and purchasing process. The information included in these reports are useful to procurement offices, entrepreneurs, and anyone working with products or a client. 

Cost: IBISWorld costs $18,709 paid annually by Purdue Libraries, IBISWorld Procurement Reports costs an additional $4,950 annually.

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

 

 

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is IBISWorld, specifically Industry Reports, brought to you by IBISWorld Inc.  

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password. Focus: IBISWorld is an industry research database, meaning that it has information about collections of companies who compete for the same consumer. Information is provided on over 700 US Industries in the US economy in reports at the granular level covering industry-specific titles from the popular to the not so popular.

Search: Search IBISWorld Industry Reports by keyword, company, code, or browse report listings. 

Click here to see the basics of searching IBISWorld Industry Reports or try our Guide on the Side with this link.

Why you should know this database: IBISWorld Industry Reports include information such as industry definitions, supply chain, major players, performance, outlook, products and markets, major companies, and key statistics. Each Industry Report is 35-50 pages in length with abridged, 6-page Executive Summaries.

Why students should know this database: IBISWorld Industry Reports also include Additional Resources, Industry Jargon, and Glossary sections which can be useful for students new to researching industries. IBISWorld has also created extensive video tutorials for users looking for in-depth knowledge on how to use some of the elements provided in these reports.

Cost: IBISWorld costs $18,709 paid annually by Purdue Libraries. 

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

Patent_Poster_v2

Welcome to Database of the Week, a feature from the Parrish Library. Each of these weekly snapshots will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This week’s database is Mergent Online brought to you by Mergent.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/businessdatabases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: Mergent Online provides access to financial statements, company news, industry analysis, historical information on M&A activity, country information, product and brand names, historical ratings, US executive biographies and compensation details, historical daily stock pricing back to 1925.

Search: Mergent Online allows users to search for companies by ticker, name, SIC, or NAICS code. This database also provides Advanced Search options and the ability to search for some private companies.

Click here to see the basics of searching Mergent or try our Guide on the Side with this link.

Why you should know this database: Mergent Online provides access to company business histories by year and business segments by time, scale, or type of currency. This database also provides annual reports, industry reports, equity reports, Mergent reports, and portraits. 

Why students should know this database: Mergent Online is easy to use and navigate and features a “News” tab where students can easily find recent news headlines on companies, including historic news.

Cost: The Mergent Online access fee costs $2,500 paid for annually by Libraries.

Database of the Week comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu.  Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this weekly feature.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu 

A new LibGuide provided by Purdue University Libraries Research Data and developed in collaboration with ITaP displays the variety of data storage options available to researchers at Purdue University. After conversations with new faculty and graduate students where specific information on the data storage options present at Purdue and the considerations that go into selecting an appropriate data storage solution for a given data set were requested, the LibGuide was designed to meet those needs for all researchers.

The primary page lists six of the most common selection criteria for all available storage solutions at Purdue, including price, available storage, primary use, backups, access after leaving Purdue’s campus, and access from and to high performance computing systems. Each storage solution then has a profile page that includes in-depth information on 23 selection criteria, to give researchers a comprehensive picture for each data storage solution.

A link to the LibGuide can be found here: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/DataStorage

9781557537430Discover a hidden facet of Indiana’s long agricultural history in Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family: A Photo History of Indiana’s Early County Extension Agents. Follow the story of early extension agents on their journey through rural farmland in never before seen photos. These agents worked hand in hand with local farmers to improve agricultural practices and the way of life across the state with research from Purdue University and other institutions.

Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family is an officially endorsed legacy project for Indiana’s Bicentennial illustrating the importance of agricultural development through technology, research and extension.

Two Purdue faculty members, Fredrick Whitford (F.W.) and David Hovde (D.H.) and archivist Neal Harmeyer (N.H.) worked together to compose this book. Each author spent countless hours in the Purdue University Libraries Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center discovering photos and weaving together the stories of Indiana’s Extension agents, farmers and agriculture history. Find out each of their motivations and insights on the book in our Q&A with the authors: Fred, David and Neal.

What lead to the creation of this book?

4HFairF.W.While working on another book I noticed the wonderful photographs that the extension agents were taking as part of their annual reports. With the bicentennial coming up, it looked like a great time to showcase what some of the original Extension agents did as part of their efforts in getting the Extension service started in the state.

N.H. — This book came into being after it became apparent these images told the story of early 20th century Indiana agriculture. After discussing the sheer number of images, variety of subjects and activities captured, it became apparent a book would introduce readers to an important part of Hoosier history.

How was it to research within the Purdue Archives and Special Collections to determine dates, locations, and significance of each photo?


F.W
.— We were lucky from the start, that these photos were saved in the archives. The photos are one of a kind treasures. The fact that they were in folders labeled by year helped immensely. What was really encouraging was that many had names associated with them. I have used these photos in the counties where these people lived and buildings once existed. People have seen relatives like great grandfathers that they had never seen before from the photos preserved in the archives.

How does Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family tie into the culture and heritage of Indiana?

Car photo3

N.H.— As Indiana celebrates its bicentennial in 2016, one naturally looks back to its centennial. A hundred years ago, which coincides with many of the images in the book, agriculture was a way of life for many Hoosiers. As the state looked ahead to its second century, changes in technology and the agricultural marketplace were beginning to take root. Generations of families farmed the same land, always striving to maintain their family heritage. My own family is one of those, and to catch even a glimpse into the world of my ancestors was special. I think readers of Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family will also uncover those familial connections and grow to understand the work ethic, ingenuity, and strength of our Hoosier forbearers.

D.H.— This books explores an often overlooked aspect of Indiana history. Indiana remains a state with a large agricultural economy.  It tells the story of how the Purdue Extension agents helped farmers view what they were doing as a business. Also, it demonstrates how these agents, through their educational practices, improved the health of both the people and animals, the local economy, and welfare of the community as a whole.

How does Extension farming exist today and how does this project show its evolution?

F.W.— The first Extension educators were at the forefront of modern farming. They were seeing the first introductions of lime, tractors, hybrid corn, and much more.

What did you learn from working on this project?

D.H. — The subject of the book is a part of Purdue University’s and Indiana’s history I knew little about.  It was a fascinating exploration into the rural Midwestern life of the early twentieth century. It features some aspects of the technology and culture that had changed little from the pioneer period.

What was your favorite part of working on this project?

field photoN.H.— My favorite part was learning more about how different parts of Indiana worked together through Purdue Extension to improve not only their farms and way of life, but the way of life for people across the United States and the world. The ability for a farmer to take part in cutting-edge research in a controlled and targeted way meant that farmers were no longer at the whim of the elements. Instead, farmers were able to work with allies to strengthen their ability to make a living. That was, and still is, exciting and tremendously enjoyable to read and learn more about during the process of creating this book.

D.H.I enjoyed looking deep into the photographs, examining the details of the material culture, the clothing, the technology, the activities and the expression on peoples’ faces.  Many times we had discussions over which one of a half dozen images would best show the topic we were discussing. Many times it was a hard decision.

About the Authors

Fredrick Whitford
Frederick Whitford works for the Purdue Cooperative Extension Service in the College of Agriculture. He received a BS in wildlife management from Louisiana Tech University, and an MS and PhD in entomology from Iowa State University. He has authored more than 250 research, extension, and regulatory publications, and has delivered at least 5,000 presentations to a wide array of audiences. He has written several other books about the history of Indiana agriculture, all published by Purdue University Press.

Neal Harmeyer
Neal Harmeyer is an archivist at Purdue University Archives and Special Collections. Harmeyer grew up on a multigenerational family farm in northeastern Fayette County, Indiana, where he helped raise animals. He earned a BA degree in history from Purdue and an MLS degree from Indiana University.

David M. Hovde
David M. Hovde, the research and instruction librarian in the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center, is an associate professor of library science and has been at Purdue University since 1989. He has authored or coauthored numerous monographs, books, book chapters, and articles in archaeology, history, semiotics, and pedagogy.

Standing in front of the classroom as an instructor can be a lonely experience, but faculty who partner with Purdue’s IMPACT program are learning how sharing their knowledge and insights can help themselves, and others, create engaging learning environments at Purdue.

More than 100 Purdue faculty members recently attended the 2016 IMPACT symposium to share and learn from one another about the high-impact educational practices used in courses at Purdue to create meaningful student engagement and how to increase the effectiveness of learning activities in their own classrooms.

Purdue’s IMPACT program (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation) is a University-wide initiative which brings instructors together to redesign foundational courses to make them more student-centered. Since 2011, more than 200 faculty members have participated in IMPACT, during which they gather in regular cohort meetings, develop a course redesign plan and collaborate with ITaP educational technologists, faculty from the Purdue Libraries and instructional developers from the Center for Instructional Excellence.

Faculty interested in participating, or learning more about the IMPACT program, should visit the IMPACT website.

George Kuh, the symposium’s keynote speaker and the director of the National Survey of Student Engagement, (watch his keynote speech here) emphasized the need for students to reflect on their experiences in and out of the classroom, apply what they have learned to new challenges, and integrate what they are learning from different courses and out-of-class experiences.

After the presentation, faculty members split into discussion groups to talk about three themes from Kuh’s talk: fostering student success, empowering diverse learners and forging tomorrow’s workplace. The symposium planning group, comprised of Libraries faculty Clarence Maybee, the group’s chair, and Michael Flierl, and ITaP staff members Suzanne Ahlersmeyer and Sheree Buikema, saw a number of great ideas generated from the discussion groups

Buikema, an ITaP instructional designer, says faculty discussing how to foster student success emphasized the need to make learning relevant by providing practical examples and experiences – for example, by partnering with organizations to give students opportunities to engage with professionals in the field. Other items discussed included creating a culture where students worked together, giving up some instructional control to empower students to take control of their learning, and setting up clear expectations and avenues for feedback.

Faculty discussing how to empower diverse learners said it was important to motivate students by explaining the “why” behind instructional activities, says Flierl, an assistant professor with the Libraries. Also key: relating material to real-world contexts and recording lectures so students can go back and listen to them again.

Real-life activities were also the focus of discussion for faculty members looking at how to forge tomorrow’s workplace. Maybee, assistant professor of Libraries, says several faculty members described class activities and projects that helped students prepare for their professional lives after graduation. For example, one instructor developed a quantitative reasoning course so that non-majors could have a math experience more representative of what they may encounter in the workforce. Another has students in a capstone course model research and prepare literature-based presentations like they might at a conference.

Ultimately, the symposium helped remind faculty that if creating an engaging learning environment for students isn’t an easy task, it is one that can be accomplished by working together.

“I think mainly I was reminded that, from the lens of the student, every course, instructor, is part of a single broader learning environment that, if successful, should culminate in student growth,” says Ben Wiles, Purdue’s director of institutional effectiveness. “We need to continue to actively collaborate to ensure a cohesive, coherent, and productive experience for our students.”

Writer:  David Stephens, technology writer, Information Technology at Purdue (ITaP), 765-496-7998, steph103@purdue.edu

Last updated: July 28, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded $750,000 to Purdue University to support a unique approach to research, scholarly publishing and communications on global grand challenges.

The approach at Purdue is unique in two ways. First, it catalyzes the involvement of humanists and social scientists in grand challenges research, innovation and policy formation. Next, it embeds publishing professionals, libraries faculty and policy experts in the scholarly communications process.

Mellon’s support of the program enables broadly interdisciplinary teams to tackle grand challenges in new ways, with expert assistance in communicating results directly to the public and key stakeholders (policymakers, not-for-profit organizations, and others), so that new research gets more swiftly and effectively out of the academy into the hands of people who need it.

The approach is designed to drive innovation in grand challenges research while facilitating change in scholarly publishing in order to achieve greater public value.

The Scholarly Publishing Division of the Purdue University Libraries, the Purdue Policy Research Institute in Discovery Park, the College of Liberal Arts and the Purdue Systems Collaboratory are all partners on the grant. Peter Froehlich, director of the Libraries’ Scholarly Publishing Division, and Laurel Weldon, director of the Purdue Policy Research Institute, will serve as principal investigators. This award follows on an earlier award of $539,000 from the Mellon Foundation in 2014.

“We’re excited to be receiving this new award from Mellon,” Froehlich said. “It’s vital for publishers and policy centers to have support like this to work with researchers to explore ways to short-circuit traditional approaches to scholarly communications. The new award is a strong endorsement of our collaborative approach to research and scholarly publishing at Purdue.”

Weldon agreed.

“Thanks to the previous support we received from Mellon and to our work with our partners on the grant across campus, PPRI has been able to develop a model for high-impact, interdisciplinary research. We look forward to sparking greater innovation in interdisciplinary research and scholarly communications through this project,” she said.

The majority of the grant funds will support competitively selected research projects.

Applicant teams can recruit members from any institution, but lead principal investigators must be faculty in the Purdue College of Liberal Arts.  At least one research faculty from a STEM field as well as one member of the Libraries’ faculty must be included on each team. Projects will be funded from January 1, 2017 through July 31, 2019.  The title of the project is “Breaking Through: Multidisciplinary Solutions to Global Grand Challenges.”

Details about applying, informational events and deadlines will be released soon.  Researchers can direct questions to Froehlich and Weldon at humstem@purdue.edu.

————————-

Writer: Megan Huckaby, 765-496-1325, mhuckaby@purdue.edu

Sources: Peter Froehlich, 765-494-8251, pfroehli@purdue.edu

Laurel Weldon, 765-494-4185, weldons@purdue.edu