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Purdue Libraries' Graduate Research Information ProgramThe Graduate Research Information Program, or G.R.I.P., workshop series schedule is set for the 2018-19 academic year. The series is designed to enhance graduate students’ research skills. Each workshop session is led by a Purdue Libraries faculty member.

The series is sponsored by the Libraries and The Graduate School. All G.R.I.P. workshops are open free to graduate students at Purdue University.

The 2018-19 schedule is listed below; registration will be available soon via a link on the G.R.I.P. library guide (LibGuide) at guides.lib.purdue.edu/grip.

  • Introduction to Citation Management | 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), room 3045
    What is a citation manager? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero? What about the others? If you have ever wondered about any of these questions, this is the session for you. We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • Do You Get Data? Understanding Data Visualization | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, WALC, room 3049
    As data visualizations become more popular, are you prepared to think critically about the stories and messages conveyed in visualizations? Can you accurately tell the story the data wants to tell in your own visualizations? In this session, we will introduce you to a framework for critically engaging with everyday data. Facilitator: Sarah Huber
  • Endnote Basic for Education Students | 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, HSSE (Humanities, Social Science, and Education) Library CSC (Customer Service Center), room 142
    EndNote Basic citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations. Users will be able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliogra-phies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions. In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, “Cite While You Write” feature, and sharing with a group. If possible, please bring your laptop. Only for education students. Facilitator: Judy Nixon
  • Zotero | 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, WALC, room 3045
    Zotero is a free citation management program that can help you collect, organize, and share your research. This session is designed to help graduate students get started with Zotero. Attendees will learn how to set up Zotero, gather citations, and generate bibliographies. Facilitator: David Zwicky
  • Endnote Desktop | 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, WALC, room 3045
    EndNote Desktop citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations. With EndNote, users are able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliographies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions. In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, “Cite While You Write” feature, and sharing with a group. If possible, please bring your laptop. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • BibTex | 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 19, WALC, room 3045
    Are you a LaTeX user confused by citation management? BibTex is reference management software that allows you to easily cite papers, create formatted bibliographies in your LaTeX documents, and connect to citation managers like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero. This workshop will be an introduction to BibTeX, using the Overleaf platform licensed by Purdue. Facilitator: David Zwicky
  • Introduction to PURR | 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, WALC, room 3045
    One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to a thesis or dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google), and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice. Facilitator: Sandi Caldrone
  • Introduction to Systematic Reviews 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, WALC, room 3045
    Systematic reviews are becoming more prevalent, and increasingly, students are becoming part of the review teams, but there can be confusion around what constitutes a systematic review. Participants in this class will learn about the different review types, including systematic, scoping, and narrative. Participants will also develop an understanding for choosing the appropriate review, based on the research question and the resources available, including time and size of the research team. Common standards for structuring the review, encompassing a variety of topic areas, will be provided. This workshop is ideal for first-time members or PIs on a systematic or scoping review. Facilitator: Jason Reed
  • Voyant Tools for Systematic Reviews | 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, WALC, room 3045
    Using a Text Analysis Tool to Develop Your Search Strategy Text analysis tools are helpful in the development of search strategies for systematic reviews. In this workshop, we’ll conduct a literature search. Then, we’ll use Voyant Tools to generate a set of search terms and apply text analysis procedures to develop, test, and validate a search strategy. Facilitator: Bethany McGowan
  • Conducting a Literature Review | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13,  WALC, room 3045
    A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find. Facilitators: Clarence Maybee and Heather Howard (tentative)
  • Open Refine | 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, WALC, room 3045
    Do you use research strategies like text mining, social networking analysis, or data cleaning in your research? In this series of workshops, we’ll demonstrate research tools and provide datasets for hands-on exploration. You’ll walk away with exposure to tools and techniques that support your research and a better idea of the support systems available through Purdue University Libraries. In this workshop you’ll use OpenRefine to import data in various formats, easily explore large datasets, and clean and transform data with basic and advanced cell transformations. Facilitator: Bethany McGowan (tentative)
  • Introduction to PURR | 2 p.m. Tuesday, January 15, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    Data sharing and publication: One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to a thesis or dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google), and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice. Facilitator: Sandi Caldrone
  • Introduction to Citation Management | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    What is a citation manager? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero? What about the others? If you have ever wondered about any of the questions, this is the session for you. We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • Conducting a Literature Review | 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find. Facilitators: Clarence Maybee and Heather Howard (tentative)