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‘CHEM’ category

“To build up the future, you have to know the past.” — Otto Frank

“From the Past to the Future” series by Teresa Brown also appears in INSIDe, the Purdue University Libraries’ newsletter for Libraries personnel. As faculty and staff in Purdue University Libraries consolidate six libraries in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center this summer, we’ll feature the history of each of the now closed libraries here weekly.

In 1924, the general policy of the University involved the centralization of the books and their uses for reference in the Main Library Building. In certain instances however, there were departures from this policy and collections of books were placed in other buildings on campus.

The most important of these collections was the Chemistry Library, located in the Chemistry building. It was the oldest and largest of the department libraries. Practically all the usable books and periodicals relating to Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, about 2,000 in all, were housed in this library where they were readily accessible for reference to the students at work in the laboratories of the department. University Librarian William M. Hepburn believed departmental libraries sprang from the “rapid growth of library collections without a corresponding increase in the size of the Main Library Building.”

In 1929, a complete dictionary catalog and shelf list were prepared for the books shelved in the Chemistry Library, and it was planned to include cards for the chemical books kept in the General, Chemical Engineering and Agricultural Experiment Station libraries. A tri-weekly messenger service was established to deliver books and periodicals to departmental libraries and to deliver and pick up periodicals circulated to 20 departments for faculty use.

In 1930, for the first time the Library leadership provided a part-time assistant to users of departmental collections in Chemistry and Pharmacy. According to M.G. Mellon’s autobiography, the first Chemistry librarian was Bernice Dunten, who had been a WWI Army Nurse. She remained the librarian until 1940, when she moved to the Pharmacy Library. Mellon noted that, in the hot summers of 1934 and 1936, she ejected students (presumably male) from the library for going “topless.”

Interior of Purdue University Libraries' Chemistry Library in early 2017.

Interior of Purdue University Libraries’ Chemistry Library in early 2017.

Ms. Dunten was followed by Ruth Power (1940-49), a graduate (like Dunten) of the University of Illinois Library School. She was followed (perhaps) by someone named Dunbar (Mellon is not clear about this in his autobiography).

In 1948-49, responsibility for the Chemistry Library shifted from the department head to the Director of Libraries John Moriarty.

The new Chemistry building was completed in 1955 at a cost of over $4,500,000, and the Chemistry Library moved into its new home with Librarian Fred J. Bassett (1951-56) overseeing its grand opening. The departmental library, with a capacity of 40,000 volumes, was located on the third floor of the new building. The description of the library in the open house brochure read as follows: “On entering it (the library) one finds oneself in a large, acoustically treated, air-conditioned reading room with bookshelves around the sides and long study tables and chairs in the center. The Librarian’s desk is immediately to the right, and behind this are two small rooms where books may be repaired or prepared for binding. At the left in the reading room is a long alcove for abstract journals. Beyond this is a separate small reading room with current journals and magazines arranged on open shelves. To the west of the main reading room is the stack room. The stacks are constructed in three tiers and extend from the third floor to the ceiling of the fourth floor. A small service elevator has been installed to facilitate the transportation of books between the several levels of stacks. This room is also supplied with 21 study carrels, seven on each tier. There is no laboratory above any part of the library so that a leakage of water and chemical cannot occur in such a way as to damage the books and manuscripts.”

Bassett was followed by James Van Luik, who was there for two years (1956-58). He was presumably followed by Dorothy Kreman, who served until John Pinzelik started in 1960 and retired in 1993. Bartow Culp followed until his retirement in 2009. In 2003, Michael Fosmire was appointed as Head, Physical Sciences, Engineering and Technology Division, with Jeremy Garritano serving as Chemistry librarian (June 2004-May 2014). Currently David Zwicky is assistant professor liaison for the Chemistry department.

The Chemistry library has undergone some cosmetic updates over the years including a new circulation desk and study carrels. As a teaching and research library, it has continued to stay up-to-date with the services it offers to the Purdue staff and students and surrounding community. In 2007, The Mellon CyberChemistry Lab was opened and featured 10 PCs with software specifically related to chemistry, math, and citation management. The core objective of this space was to help users more effectively apply the information that was available to them, and as a result make their assignments and their research more meaningful.

First book shelved in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

First book shelved in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue University Libraries Associate Professor and Head of the Health & Life Sciences Division Vicki Killion placed the first book on a shelf in the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center Monday (May 15) morning.

Purdue University Libraries’ personnel from facilities and faculty and staff from the former separate Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; Physics; and Engineering libraries are working this week to merge the materials into the consolidated library in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

The new building opens to the public Aug. 7.

More information about about the newly consolidated library and new building is available at blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/2017/04/27/walc-move-faqs/.

Below are some photos of the first books moved into the Library of Engineering and Science, as well as a few photos of the inside of the building.

 


Vicki Killion, associate professor in Purdue University Libraries, places the first book on the shelf in the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center at Purdue University.

Vicki Killion, associate professor and head of the Health & Life Sciences Division in Purdue University Libraries, places the first book on the shelf in the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center at Purdue University.

Dan Yeoman and Jacinda Laymon from Libraries Facilities move books into the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Dan Yeoman and Jacinda Laymon from Libraries Facilities move books into the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Victoria Thomas (left) and Sandy Galloway working to organize the books on the shelves in the new Library of Engineering & Science, Purdue University Libraries in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Victoria Thomas (left) and Sandy Galloway working to organize the books on the shelves in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Ralph Mickey (left) and Monica Kirkwood in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. The first books were moved to the newly consolidated library Monday, May 15.

Ralph Mickey (left) and Monica Kirkwood in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. The first books were moved to the newly consolidated library Monday, May 15.

Purdue University students Lashta Saber and Adam Kunkel organizing the books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue University students Lashta Saber and Adam Kunkel organizing the books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Liz Lukens, JJ Carroll, Adam Kunkel, Lashta Saber, and Victoria Thomas shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Liz Lukens, JJ Carroll, Adam Kunkel, Lashta Saber, and Victoria Thomas shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Sandy Galloway (center, front), Robin Meher, and Lil Conarroe shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Sandy Galloway (center, front), Robin Meher, and Lil Conarroe shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Library of Engineering and Science Information Desk in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center

Library of Engineering and Science Information Desk in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

This mural shows the interior of the boiler house (in the former Power Plant) with students learning alongside of workers under the guidance of faculty. This was, perhaps, an early version of active learning that is continued with the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

This mural shows the interior of the boiler house (in the former Power Plant) with students learning alongside of workers under the guidance of faculty. This was, perhaps, an early version of active learning that is continued with the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from the Library of Engineering and Science's information desk in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from the Library of Engineering and Science’s information desk in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center. Computer workstations are being installed during the summer of 2017. The building will open to the public Monday, Aug. 7.

The atrium inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (first floor)

The atrium inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (first floor).

The Reading Room in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from inside the Reading Room in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from one of the large windows inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center's Reading Room.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from one of the large windows inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center’s Reading Room.

The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC)

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” — John F. Kennedy

 

Today and this weekend will be one that is bittersweet for many on the Purdue University campus–and especially so for many in Purdue University Libraries.

Many students are wrapping up their final exams and will soon head home for the summer, leaving their college lives behind for a time. Those who are graduating next week are preparing for commencement and are likely looking toward their new lives in the work world or in advanced degree programs.

And, here in Purdue Libraries, today and tomorrow, we are closing the buildings of six of our libraries–to start the process of the move to the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center (photo above).

The newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, along with the many active learning resources available in the Wilmeth Center, will officially open to the public Monday, August 7.

Information about the individual libraries that are closing, as well as for Purdue Libraries’ users, is just below.


Today (Friday, May 5), the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will close at 5 p.m; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

The libraries that will remain open during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center include:

  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Aviation Technology Library
  • Black Cultural Center
  • Hicks Undergraduate Library
  • Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics
  • Veterinary Medical Library

From May 7-June 11, Purdue Libraries’ users who need materials from the closed libraries can search for and retrieve materials by using the secure Interlibrary (ILL) System or UBorrow. An active Purdue Career ID is required for login. You will be notified when the material you requested is ready for pick up at the ILL Office in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library or is ready for download. For currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars, we deliver the research material you need to your desktop or office quickly and efficiently.

From June 12 through the opening of the WALC (August 7), users will be able to submit requests for the materials located in the closed locations and pick up their materials from an open library of their choosing. After the WALC opens, materials in the closed libraries can still be requested in the Libraries catalog and will be delivered to an open library of their choosing. Office and desktop delivery for currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars will continue.


Here’s to the future, Purdue!

— Teresa Koltzenburg, Director of Strategic Communication

 

November is Native American Heritage month and the Purdue University Libraries worked with Felica Ahasteen-Bryant, Director of the Native American Educational and Cultural Center, to create display cases in the following Purdue Libraries to recognize and honor the Native American culture.

Engineering Library
Display focuses on Native engineers, including Mary Golda Ross and John Herrington, and Purdue AISES chapter. A variety of Native artwork is also included. Created by Sandy Galloway.

HSSE Library
Display focuses on the Navajo including Navajo books and artwork. Created by Patrick Whalen.

Physics Library
Display focuses on the universe, specifically Native American legends related to stars and constellations. Created by Becky Hunt

Chemistry Library
Display focuses on sustainable and renewable energy. Includes posters, pictures and articles on current events taking place in Native communities.  Created by Becky Hunt.

Hicks Undergraduate Library
The display at the Hicks Undergraduate Library shows a selection of titles available in the media collection that highlight several areas of Native American history, culture, and portrayals in popular film. The corresponding LibGuide has also been updated to reflect recent acquisitions.  It can be found here: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/content.php?pid=434712. Created by Ann O’Donnell.

For a list of events visit the Native American Educational and Cultural Center’s website.

Starting this fall semester, Purdue Libraries will offer a text message reference service, in addition to email and chat services.

Get a brief answer to your simple question. TEXT Purduelib to 66746 to get started!

Purdue Libraries’ reference service has many options available, whether the physical library is open or not. In fact, Libraries is never closed to people who need information. Choose text for short answers, chat for 1:1 conversational assistance or email for more comprehensive assistance.

Purdue Libraries’ NEW Ask a Librarian website focuses on letting students choose the assistance which fits their needs. For more information visit: www.lib.purdue.edu/askalib

Purdue Libraries has made some changes to reserve policies across the libraries to lessen confusion for those using the reserve system and ensure that reserves are available to all students as equitably as possible. These will be in effect beginning  January 9, 2012. Reserves will continue to be held by request of the instructor behind the circulation desk and available for only a limited loan period. Instructors may designate the library where a reserve is held and select either the two hour (standard) or one week loan period.

Reserve: 2 Hour Loan – These items can now leave the library where they are checked out, but must be returned to the circulation desk of the lending library. No reserve items can be kept overnight and all reserves must be returned before the lending library closes for the day, even if this means the loan period is shortened.

Reserve: 1 Week Loan – Will circulate for 1 week.

Penalties – Items that have a circulation period of less than one day will be subject to fines after the item is overdue for one hour.  For current list of fees, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/access/circserv/policy.

To request reserves, fill out the form found at www.lib.purdue.edu/coursereserves. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Laurie Sadler lsadler@purdue.edu or 49-46238.

Reaxys Updates – Fall 2011

October 10th, 2011

Reaxys was updated on September 9, 2011

This release contains some exciting new additions to Reaxys, most notably the Similarity Searching capability, and the enhancements to Reaxys structure searching. The key highlights include:

  • Structure similarity searching: a new similarity searching method allows researchers to quickly find results in Reaxys even if the structure of interest does not exist in Reaxys’ extensive dataset. Reaxys similarity searching is fast enough to provide results for five different similarities almost instantaneously – the researcher can select which result set to view (positional/stereo isomers, near, medium, wide and widest similarity).
  • Reaction similarity searching: it is now also possible to search for similar reactions of a given reaction query: Reaxys will analyze the reaction query, identify the atoms and groups involved in the reaction process and run a search for all reactions that show similar characteristics. The reaction similarity searching is fast and provides results in a few seconds.
  • Structure Search Enhancements:
    –  Link nodes: it is now possible to use the Link nodes feature in the Structure Editors (Link nodes allow specifying query structures containing rings or chains of variable size).
    – Unsaturated atom: an atom of a given structure query can be defined as being unsaturated
    – Frequency exact in R-Groups: it is possible to define the exact frequency of R-groups in structure queries
    – Multi-center bonds: Reaxys supports queries containing multi-center bonds
    – Aromatic bond: Reaxys supports the search for aromatic bond types.

For the full details on this release please check the “About” hyperlink displayed at the bottom of the Reaxys query page.

Cyberinfrastructure-based research has infinitely increased the amount of data being collected and analyzed. Growing demands, both social and political, are driving the importance of sharing the information. But who should have access to it, how long should its shelf life be, and how will other researchers access it? Those questions can be addressed through two services offered by Purdue University: a research data hub and data curation profiles.

Research Data Hub

The newly created Purdue University Research Repository (PURR), located at http://research.hub.purdue.org, provides a platform for managing and disseminating information while also offering updated information on data management plan creation. Developed through a collaboration of Libraries, ITaP (Information Technology at Purdue) and the Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR), the HubZe­ro-powered site helps researchers comply with new National Science Foundation requirements for data management plans in proposals.

A Data Management Plan tool developed by the Libraries serves as a do-it-yourself kit for creating data management plans. Other resources on the hub help researchers navigate the process of making their data available (in essence, “publishing” it) in ways that suit their research objectives.

“Libraries faculty can work through the DMP tool with investiga­tors to help them identify and understand data management needs, regardless of whether someone needs a data management plan or just wants to expand discovery and dissemination of research out­puts,” says Scott Brandt, associate dean for research and professor of library science with Purdue University Libraries.

Data Curation Profiles

Long before NSF requirements, Purdue Libraries were fine-tuning an instrument called the Data Curation Profile, which assesses needs related to the discovery and dissemination of research data. Completed profiles identify how data will be managed, archived and preserved so that it is accessible to a wide group of people and over a long period of time.

“The profiles can benefit faculty who are at a point in their re­search where they are looking at options for making data available,” says Brandt. “On the other hand, the DMP Tool is for researchers who are initiating new projects, especially where data management plans are required as part of the proposal.”

Libraries faculty can collaborate with researchers to work through the profile and, as appropriate, use their expertise to con­nect researchers with resources that can help enhance manage­ment, discovery and dissemination of data.

“By walking through the profile process, a researcher can see issues related to data workflow that will likely affect making data available later on,” says Jake Carlson, associate professor in the Li­braries who developed both the Data Curation Profile and the Data Management Plan Tool.

Libraries faculty can assist researchers in creating a Data Curation Profile. For a list of librarian contacts along subject lines, visit www. lib.purdue.edu/rguides/instructionalservices/librarians.html.

Dimensions of Discovery, September 2011 (Issue 1)