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The Aviation Technology (AvTech) Library located at the Purdue University Airport was closed Wednesday, Aug. 7 and will remain closed through January 2, 2020, as it undergoes a substantial renovation.

During the renovation, the materials and collections will not be accessible at the AvTech Library. Some materials will be available in the Library of Engineering and Science, located in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC). Other materials can be requested via Interlibrary Loan (see www.lib.purdue.edu/services/interlibrary-loan).

Information about access to materials for reserve and about book returns will be posted on the AvTech Library web page.

For more information, contact Operations Manager Craig Leavell at cleavell@purdue.edu.

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring Business Source Complete, brought to you by EBSCO Industries, Inc.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/az.php?s=71213 is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: Provides indexing to more than 3,000 publications, including nearly 1,600 peer-reviewed journals in business such as marketing, accounting, finance, international business, and more.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of using Business Source Complete.

Start with this hint: Use the publications tab to browse country reports, industry profiles, market research reports, SWOT analyses.

Why you should know this database: Business Source Complete also includes SWOT analyses, company and industry profiles, and market research reports.

Related Resources

Some other resources you might want to explore, are:

  • BCC Market Research, contains market research reports, industry reviews, newsletters and conferences for competitive business intelligence.
  • Mintel, includes market research reports for Europe, the UK, and the US. Reports discuss market drivers, market size & trends, and more.

This Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil

Those of us who work in our unit at Purdue could not be more excited we have our new leader, Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil, in place!

Formerly the dean of library services and professor at Iowa State University, Dean McNeil started July 1, and she has been in a whirlwind of meetings, email messages, activities, events, and moving preparations since. (Our unit’s administration has been in Potter 160 with the ongoing HVAC work in Stewart Center; we are set to move back to the second floor of STEW soon.)

Dean McNeil is no stranger to Purdue. Previously, she was Purdue’s associate dean for academic affairs and a professor of Purdue Libraries. Before her initial appointment at Purdue, McNeil was assistant, and then associate, dean of libraries for the University of Nebraska. She also has held positions in the libraries at Bradley University and the University of Illinois.

As we navigate our new identity as a school at Purdue, you will all be hearing more from and about Dean McNeil. But, for now, below is a short Q&A that provides a glimpse into a bit more about her.

Welcome Dean McNeil!

Q: You have been back in Indiana and at Purdue now about one month now. What are some of the things you like about being back here in the Greater Lafayette Area? What do you and your family do outside of work for fun and relaxation?

McNeil: It’s great to be back on a campus that is so alive, even in the summer. My family includes my husband, Wes, who owns a small book company, and sons Nick (14) and Eli (10). My boys are active in sports, and we spend a lot of time outside of work at various games and in other outdoor activities. They have been visiting on weekends and will join me here in a few weeks, just before the start of school in West Lafayette.

During recent weekend visits we’ve done some hiking in Happy Hollow Park (a favorite activity when we lived here before), visited some local restaurants we remember fondly (Dog ‘n Suds ranks pretty high on the boys’ list), reconnecting with former neighbors and friends, and tackled a few projects in our new home. Last Saturday, we attended many of the Apollo 50th events, including the awesome “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” exhibit in Purdue Archives and Special Collections, and the late afternoon F-100 flyover. Really, a wonderful experience for the whole family. Fun fact: If you look very closely, you can find us in some of the campus photos.

Q: Why did you decide to come back to Purdue to take the helm of the Purdue Libraries and newly named “Libraries and School of Information Studies”?

McNeil: Short answer: The opportunity. Plus, I like a challenge. Having been here before, I have some knowledge of campus and people, which has been beneficial to me so far, but there have been many changes in the past four years, and I want to take advantage of being “new” as well, to be sure my eyes and ears are wide open to new possibilities. Leading the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies is an amazing opportunity to support Purdue in educating students and producing research that will change the world. I expect it will be fun, too.

Q: What challenges ahead are the most exciting? Which are most pressing?

McNeil: The most exciting challenge is to expand our teaching in support of the new School of Information Studies. We have excellent faculty and staff ready to grow our course offerings, and my impression so far is that, collectively, we are excited about and ready for this challenge. Most pressing — for me — is to come up to speed on the many data-science-related happenings at Purdue and finding the places where we in the Libraries and School of Information Studies can contribute.

Q: Any other information you would like to impart that was not touched on in questions above?

McNeil: I am looking forward to visiting with faculty, staff, and students in the next few weeks, as I make my way around campus. Please feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions or want to share information or your opinions about the future of the Libraries and School of Information Studies.

Heather Howard, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Heather Howard speaking at the Midwest Business Librarian Summit 2019.

Many marketing instructors demonstrate how professional marketers incorporate Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs in their approaches to product or service development for their target customer segments. So it’s not surprising that Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Heather Howard developed the Midwest Business Librarian Summit to meet her fellow business librarians’ needs — belonging, esteem, and self-actualization — shown in the upper area of the famous pyramid hierarchy.

“Currently there are no national conferences that are business librarian focused, and the ones many go to, such as the American Library Association or Special Library Association, have limited content for business librarians or are prohibitively expensive for many librarians,” Howard explained.

Although she’s not a marketing instructor, at Purdue Howard teaches courses that incorporate business information concepts (marketing being an extremely important one), and she helps Purdue students and faculty navigate the complex web of information and data fundamental to business success. In 2018, she organized the Indiana Business Librarian Summit (held at Purdue), which about 25 individuals attended.

David Hummels, Purdue University Krannert School of Management

Dean of the Krannert School of Management and Distinguished Professor of Economics David Hummels welcomed the nearly 70 attendees of the Midwest Business Librarian Summit July 24 at Purdue University.

This year, she rebranded the July 24 event as the “Midwest Business Librarian Summit” (or MBLS) and featured David Hummels, the Dr. Samuel R. Allen Dean of the Krannert School of Management and Distinguished Professor of Economics, who welcomed those who attended. The new Dean of Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil gave the keynote presentation. Both addressed the nearly 70 business librarians and information professionals who attended from areas across the region — a significant increase in attendees in only one year.

Clearly, Howard is on to something.

Below, she provides more detail about MBLS… and her plans for its future.

Q: Tell me about the Midwest Business Librarian Summit: how and why did you start it?

Howard: The Midwest Business Librarian Summit started in 2018 as the Indiana Business Librarian Summit. After attendees came from all over the area, it was rebranded in 2019 as MBLS to better represent the interest in the event.

Beth McNeil, Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil presents the keynote at MBLS 2019, held in the Hicks Undergraduate Library at Purdue.

I started the event because I saw a need for business librarians in the area to get together to talk about projects they are working on, databases and resources, and all things business librarian. This year I also organized the event, but I had the help of a committee of business librarians.

Q: Is this summit affiliated with other summit events for those business librarians who work, for example, in different geographic areas?

Howard: Nope, this is a standalone event. There are a few other groups of business librarians who also have meetings, including The Southern Academic Business Librarians Conference (SOUCABL) and the Michigan Area Business Librarians (who attended MBLS as their 2019 meeting), and there are rumors of one starting up in Colorado.

Q: Who is eligible to attend this summit/conference?

Howard: There is no limit on who can attend. We are open to anyone who is practicing business librarianship or is otherwise interested, including public, academic, and corporate librarians. Though we are called “midwest,” anyone who wants to make the trip to West Lafayette is welcome to attend.

Q: What do you hope that attendees were able to take away from the summit this year?

Teresa Williams, Butler University Libraries

Teresa Williams from Butler University Libraries presented her lightning talk, “When Databases Are No Longer an Option: Teaching Resources for Business Information” at the 2019 Midwest Business Librarian Summit held at Purdue.

Howard: I hope that attendees had great conversations with one another, are inspired by work our colleagues are doing, and form new partnerships and collaborations.

Much of the content of MBLS is provided by those who are attending in the form of lightning talks, interest group conversations, and open forum talks, so the key takeaways are determined by what people discussed.

Q: Will there be an MBLS 2020? If so, will you follow the same format next year? change it up? or will that be up to you and your committee based on feedback from this year?

Howard: There will definitely be an MBLS 2020! We received quite a bit of positive verbal feedback at the event, and the committee and I will be sending out a survey to assess what people liked and what people would like to change in future years.

I can say that many people told me they appreciated how easy it is to get to Purdue and how nice our event space was, which was great to hear.


Follow the Midwest Business Librarian Summit on Facebook at www.facebook.com/midwestbuslib/ and on Twitter at twitter.com/MidwestBusLib.

Editor’s Note: Content in this post is courtesy of Stephanie Hernandez McGavin via Shared BigData-Gateway

A team of Purdue University researchers is among the seven fellowship teams selected for the first class of the Collaborative Archive Data Research Environment (CADRE) Fellows.

These seven fellowship teams span across disciplines and offer compelling research that incorporates big data and bibliometrics. Each fellow team will access CADRE’s Web of Science (WoS) and Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG) datasets to achieve their research goals.

Purdue University members of the first class of CADRE Fellows, L to R: Michael Witt, Loran Carleton Parker, and Ann Bessenbacher

The three-member Purdue University team will work on the project, “Utilizing Data Citation for Aggregating, Contextualizing, and Engaging with Research Data in STEM Education Research.” The researchers are:

  • Michael Witt, associate professor of library science, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, Purdue University,
  • Loran Carleton Parker, associate director and senior evaluation and research associate, Evaluation Learning Research Center (ELRC), College of Education, Purdue University, and
  • Ann Bessenbacher, research associate and data scientist (ELRC), STEMEd HUB, Purdue University.

Per the description of their project: “Researchers will characterize citation of data from the literature in the field of STEM education research. A sample of relevant publication venues in the field will be identified from WoS and MAG. Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) of datasets registered with DataCite will be used to query and associate datasets with publications. The team will assess rates of citation for datasets that are cited using DataCite DOIs for each publication venue and analyze a sample of data citations and publications to determine suitability for providing an initial context to help a researcher who is unfamiliar with the data determine whether to use the dataset.”

The other six teams and their CADRE research projects are listed at https://blogs.libraries.indiana.edu/sbd-gateway/2019/07/18/cadre-first-fellows/.

The Fellows will present their research at the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI) 2019 Conference in Rome at either the workshop or tutorial that CADRE is hosting on Sept. 2.

Not only will these fellows show how CADRE helped advance their work, but they will also serve as integral use cases for how the CADRE platform is developed to suit the needs of every type of academic researcher.

Made Possible in Part by IMLS

The Shared BigData Gateway for Research Libraries (SBD-G) is a two-year Institute of Museum and Library Services-funded project to develop, seed, and maintain a cloud-based, extendable cyberinfrastructure for sharing large academic library data resources with a growing community of scholars.

SBD-G will achieve this through its platform, the Collaborative Archive & Data Research Environment (CADRE).

For more information, visit https://blogs.libraries.indiana.edu/sbd-gateway/2018/09/27/hello-world/.

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring Morningstar Investment Research Center, brought to you by Morningstar, Inc.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/az.php?s=71213 is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: Morningstar Investments Research Center offers up-to-date information on 20,000 stocks and mutual funds, and allows screening using a variety of criteria.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of using Morningstar Investment Research Center.

Start with this hint: Direct links to stock analyst reports, fund analyst reports, and ETF analyst reports are available on the homepage.

Why you should know this database: Morningstar Investment Research provides minute-to-minute stock price data in addition to historical stock price information.

Related Resources

Some other resources you might want to explore, are:

  • BizMiner, contains detailed industry analysis through marketing plan research profiles, financial analysis profiles, local business summaries, and state market index profiles.
  • ThomsonOne, comprehensive dataset of public company financial statistic, including investment analyst reports and mergers & acquisitions information.

This Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN — Faculty in Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies are part of a team of academic library faculty who recently were selected to receive a $249,179 award through the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program via the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Along with librarians at the University of Arizona and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty librarians will collaborate on the project with university classroom instructors to develop disciplinary-based, information literacy curricula.

The results of the project, “Academic Librarian Curriculum Developers: Building Capacity to Integrate Information Literacy across the University,” will be shared with academic library professionals, administrators, and information literacy thought leaders across the nation. Project team leaders include: Clarence Maybee, project lead, Purdue; Michael Flierl, co-project lead, Purdue; Maribeth Slebodnik, co-project lead, University of Arizona; and Catherine Fraser Riehle, co-project lead, University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

Preparing graduates to use digital information in their future work and lives requires teaching them to use information in disciplinary and professional learning contexts, the team leaders noted.

Maybee, associate professor and information literacy specialist at Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, explained those involved in the project will apply a learning design model that underscores the role information plays in the learning process. The project will help academic library professionals collaborate with disciplinary instructors to integrate information literacy into courses and assess the outcomes of the resulting coursework.

“I am excited to receive this IMLS grant, as it allows us to expand the work we are doing at Purdue to integrate information literacy into courses to two other large research universities—University of Arizona, and University of Nebraska, Lincoln,” he added.

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Beth McNeil noted the award is an endorsement of the innovative information literacy work Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty have been doing with such noteworthy programs as IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Information).

“Our librarian faculty are on the cutting edge of integrating information literacy into 21st-century teaching and learning styles,” McNeil said. “This award will enable our faculty to continue their transformational work and collaborate, and expand it, with librarians and instructional faculty at two other noted research institutions. Results of this important project will enhance current students’ information literacy skills, which they can apply to make better informed decisions and use to tackle tough future challenges in both their professional and personal lives.”

For more information about Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies’ involvement in the grant project, contact Maybee at cmaybee@purdue.edu. Information about the IMLS grant award is available at www.imls.gov/grants/awarded/re-13-19-0021-19.

Michael Flierl, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

Michael Flierl

“It can be challenging for instruction librarians to create sustained collaborations with instructors beyond the one-shot instruction session. The results from this study make a compelling case for why collaborating with disciplinary instructors on course design―such as working together to design meaningful assignments throughout the term―can provide benefits for students in gaining information literacy skills, as well as helping them engage more deeply with course content.” ― Melissa Harden, LIRT Top Twenty Articles 2019 Selection Committee

Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor Michael Flierl, Associate Professor Clarence Maybee, and Instructional Designer Rachel Fundator, as well as Purdue Center for Instructional Excellence Instructional Developer Emily Bonem, were recently recognized by the Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) for their research article “Information literacy supporting student motivation and performance: Course-level analyses.” Their research, published in the January 2018 issue of Library and Information Science Research, was listed as one of the “Top Twenty Articles of 2018” by LIRT in its June 2019 newsletter.

Clarence Maybee, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

Clarence Maybee

“This article describes the results of a large-scale study exploring the relationships between information literacy, student academic performance, and student motivation in the context of disciplinary courses,” notes the article abstract.

Emily Bonem, Purdue Center for Instructional Excellence

Emily Bonem/Photo by Laura Fritz

The abstract continues: “Data were gathered from over 3,000 students at a public research university through an end-of-semester survey that asked questions about learning climate, basic psychological needs, student motivation, and perceptions of relevance of course content to future careers. Instructors also completed a survey indicating how often students in their courses were expected to use information in various ways, including posing questions or problems, accessing information outside of assigned readings, evaluating sources, synthesizing information and communicating results, and applying the conventions of attribution. The responses to these surveys were analyzed in conjunction with student course grades to determine the relationships between information engagement and use, and student motivation and achievement.”

Rachel Fundator, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

Rachel Fundator

“The results suggest a positive relationship between students synthesizing and communicating information throughout the term and student perceptions of autonomy and motivation. Therefore, instruction librarians should encourage disciplinary instructors to design and create many opportunities for students to engage in higher-order skills, such as synthesizing and communicating information, throughout the term. These results suggest that the benefits for students gained from these types of learning opportunities include higher academic achievement and greater motivation to learn disciplinary content presented in their courses,” assert the authors.

LIRT is part of the American Library Association and was founded in 1977. According to its website, the organization empowers librarians, from all types of libraries, to become better teachers through sharing best practices, leadership and professional development, and networking.

For more information about LIRT, visit www.ala.org/rt/lirt.

 

The “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil Armstrong Papers” exhibit commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first manned spaceflight that landed on the moon – where Purdue alumnus Neil Armstrong took those famed first steps – and coincides with Purdue University’s July celebration of the moon landing, as well as the University’s sesquicentennial celebration, 150 Years of Giant Leaps.

As part of the Apollo 11 commemoration on Purdue’s West Lafayette campus, Purdue Archives and Special Collections (ASC) is hosting an open house for the exhibit from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday, July 19. The open house will feature:

  • key Apollo 11 documents and artifacts,
  • rare film clips,
  • scavenger hunts for kids (and for those who are kids at heart), and
  • popcorn and light refreshments.

The open house is free and open to the public and ideal for children of all ages.

On Saturday, July 20 — the golden anniversary of the July 20, 1969, manned moon landing — Purdue University will host several Apollo 11-related events, which are listed at www.purdue.edu/apollo11/events/index.php. From 9 a.m.-noon (July 20), Purdue ASC will host additional exhibit viewing hours, as well as scavenger hunts.

Purdue Archives and Special Collections is located on the fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library in Stewart Center. For more information about the exhibit, contact Associate Head of Archives and Special Collections and Barron Hilton Archivist for Flight and Space Exploration Tracy Grimm at grimm3@purdue.edu.

 

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring CareerBeam, brought to you by CareerArc Group LLC.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/az.php?s=71213 is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: CareerBeam provides access to career assessments, resume and cover letter development tools, search strategies and research databases and integrates them into one portal. Please note that a person account or registration is required to access CareerBeam.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of using CareerBeam.

Start with this hint: Complete your “Quick Profile” under the Career Exploration tab to access an analysis of your values, interests, and personality.

Why you should know this database: The tools and resources available through CareerBeam can help identify industries and areas you might work best in. It can also help you decide what you’re looking for in a career and where you begin.

Related Resources

Some other databases you might want to explore, are:

  • GoinGlobal, country-specific, research tool providing advice for finding employment opportunities, job search resources, and more.
  • Vault Career Guides, include interview strategies and company profiles.

This Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.