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HIcks Study Breaks Spring 2019Take time out to relax and de-stress during prep and finals weeks this spring. Beginning Monday, April 22, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies will host Hicks Study Breaks to help students take a break from studying in the Hicks Undergraduate Library. A full list of the events, with times and dates, is below.

All events are free and open to all Purdue students and will be held in the Hicks Undergraduate Library’s main common area.

Prep Week

  • 7-8 p.m. Monday, April 22: Pet Partners
  • 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, April 23: Popcorn and Mobile Making Activity
  • 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, April 24: Cord Decorating
  • 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25: Sidewalk Chalk and Bubbles

Finals Week

  • 6-8 p.m. Monday, April 29: Popcorn and Mobile Making Activity
  • 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, April 30: Therapy Dogs International
  • 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 1: Sidewalk Chalk and Bubbles
Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor, and Michael Witt, associate professor, both in the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, accepted the Academic Connection Award for the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community from Associate Director of Residential Academic Initiatives Jonathan Manz.

Nastasha Johnson (left), assistant professor, and Michael Witt (center), associate professor, both in the Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, accepted the Academic Connection Award for the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community faculty team from Associate Director of Residential Academic Initiatives Jonathan Manz (right).

Faculty in the Purdue School of Engineering Education, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, and the Purdue Department of English engaged 53 engineering students in the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community in compelling outside-of-the-classroom activities to enhance student learning.

University Residences at Purdue University recently recognized outstanding faculty, staff, and resident assistants involved in learning communities for their exceptional work during the 2018-19 school year.

Faculty and staff who led the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community were honored with the Academic Connection Award, which recognizes the learning community that best connects courses to learning experiences outside of the classroom.

Kim Riddle (center, far end of table), director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, met with 10 students in the learning community for an Executive Boardroom Simulation.

Kim Riddle (center, far end of table), director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, meeting with the students who took part in the Executive Boardroom Simulation.

Instructors from the Purdue School of Engineering Education, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies, and the Purdue Department of English organized a variety of active learning activities with the 53 engineering students in the learning community, including:

  • The application of data science to sports, which included popcorn and watching the movie “Moneyball,” and subsequently holding class in Mackey Arena with Matt Painter and Andrew McClatchey as guest lecturers.
  • Dawn or Doom: Students attended the conference, as well as a presentation about how to present data effectively (sponsored by the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies) by Jenny Lyons from Evergreen Data. Lyons also had lunch and talked with the engineering students about careers in data science.
Engineering students engaging in the Python with Pythons activity, during which they solved a programming challenge using the Python scripting language.

Engineering students engaging in the Python with Pythons activity, during which they solved a programming challenge using the Python scripting language.

  • Executive Boardroom Simulation: 10 students were selected to meet with Kim Riddle, director of engineering at Proctor and Gamble, to role play lead engineers and board members presented with two problems to solve: scaling up production of Tide Pods and increasing and retaining women employees at the company.
  • Python with Pythons: The LC instructors partnered with Columbian Park Zoo to bring in snakes and their data (how much they eat and weigh) along with a programming challenge to solve using the Python scripting language.
  • Field trip to Cummins Technical Center: Students traveled to Cummins to tour the company’s research and development facility, experiment with virtual reality and the firm’s modeling and simulation environment, learn about careers for engineers in data science, and talk with experts on applications of machine and deep learning in industry.

Faculty on the instruction team for the learning community include:

  • Tamara Moore, co-lead, professor, School of Engineering Education
  • Michael Witt, co-lead, associate professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies
  • Sean Brophy, associate professor, School of Engineering Education
  • Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies
  • Bradley Dilger, associate professor, Department of English
  • Amanda Johnston, teaching assistant, School of Engineering Education
  • Ane Caroline Ribeiro Costa, teaching assistant, Department of English
  • Amanda Smith, teaching assistant, Department of English
  • Michelle McMullin, teaching assistant, Department of English

Learn more about the Engineering in the World of Data Learning Community at www.purdue.edu/learningcommunities/profiles/engineering/engineering_data.html, and more about learning communities at Purdue at www.purdue.edu/learningcommunities/.

 

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena. Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena (Fall 2018). Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

Featured Database: Factiva

April 9th, 2019

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring Factiva, brought to you by Dow Jones & Company.

Link: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/az.php?s=71213 is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: Factiva is a global information resource that provides full-text access to top national and international newspapers (including full text of the Wall Street Journal), newswires, business journals, market research reports, analyst reports and websites.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of using Factiva.

Start with this hint: Create a simple search using the Home button and search by keyword, company name, or industry. Use the search options to narrow the results by sources or by date.

Why you should know this database: Factiva contains over 8000 publications with content from 118 countries in 22 languages and updated daily. 74% of Factiva’s premium news sources are not available on the free web and thousands more are available via Factiva on or before the date of publication by the source.

Related Resources

Some other databases you might want to explore, are:

  • ABI/Inform Global, includes articles on business conditions, trends, management techniques, corporate strategies, company news, and industry-specific topics worldwide.
  • Business Source Complete, indexes and abstracts articles in business and management, marketing, MIS, accounting, finance, international business, and related disciplines.
  • Regional Business News, full-text coverage for regional business publications incorporating 75 business news magazines, newspapers, and newswires.

 


This Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

Giant Leaps Symposium on Electronic Theses and DissertationsOn May 23, the Purdue University Graduate School and Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies are hosting an invitation-only symposium on the topic of non-traditional theses and dissertations. (A limited number of invitations are available. Visit www.lib.purdue.edu/etdgiantleaps to request an invitation.)

As universities and colleges have moved from print to digital, electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) present the opportunity to think beyond the limitations of traditional formats and processes in order to enable students to express their scholarship with greater creativity and impact.

This one-day symposium will feature keynote addresses by University of North Carolina (UNC) Greensboro Dean of Libraries and Professor Martin Halbert and Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Professor Jean-Pierre Hérubel. Sessions will explore the challenges and opportunities of ETDs by bringing together faculty and staff directly engaged in supervising theses and dissertations and managing the processes and infrastructure for producing them.

There is no cost to attend, and lunch will be provided. For more information, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/etdgiantleaps.

Courtesy of Purdue News Service

Purdue Libraries and School of Information StudiesA former associate dean and professor at Purdue University will be returning to campus after being selected the new dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies.

Beth McNeil, dean of library services and professor at Iowa State University, will join Purdue on July 1.

“Beth’s knowledge of the Purdue Libraries organization and our entire campus will be an enormous benefit as we continue to develop an integrated, campus-wide data science education ecosystem,” said Jay Akridge, provost and vice president for academic affairs and diversity. “Beth brings an impressive record of leadership excellence in library and information science to this important position.”

Previously, McNeil was Purdue’s associate dean for academic affairs and a professor of Purdue Libraries. Before her initial appointment at Purdue, McNeil was assistant, and then associate, dean of libraries for the University of Nebraska. She also has held positions in the libraries at Bradley University and the University of Illinois.

McNeil graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a bachelor’s degree in English, and her master’s in library from information studies. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Nebraska.

McNeil’s research has been published in numerous academic journals and has focused on areas such as librarians and scholarly communication, changes in libraries in the 21st century and performance management and career development.

“I look forward to working with my colleagues at Purdue as we collaborate to create innovative ways to further the work of our faculty, staff and students,” McNeil said. “Purdue is well-positioned to address the rapid development of data science and to lead the way in integrating information literacy into the curriculum.”

McNeil was one of four finalists for this position. In her role at Purdue, McNeil will lead faculty and staff focused on expanding teaching and learning in data and information literacy, digital scholarship, and undergraduate and graduate research. These efforts will be in conjunction with a University-wide Integrated Data Science Initiative in collaboration with all academic colleges.

By Abbey Nickel, see https://bit.ly/2HKKyq0

Courtesy of Purdue Today

Purdue University recognized Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor Heather Howard’s contributions to student learning by honoring her with the Exceptional Early Career Award Tuesday, March 19. Howard was surprised with the news while she was teaching a class in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

(From left) Chantal Levesque-Bristol, executive director of the Center for Instructional Excellence; Ilana Stonebraker, associate professor, Libraries and School of Information Studies; Heather Howard, Exceptional Early Career Award recipient; Jason Behenna, Howard’s husband; Erla Heyns, associate professor, Libraries and School of Information Studies; Donna Ferullo, interim associate dean for academic affairs, Libraries and School of Information Studies; and Marcy Towns, professor of chemistry. (Purdue University photo/John Underwood)

The Exceptional Early Career Award recognizes outstanding undergraduate teaching among Purdue’s early career, tenure-track faculty. Recipients of the award will receive a $5,000 award with additional funds for a department business account.

Howard is among faculty in other departments being awarded this spring. For more information, visit the original piece in Purdue Today at www.purdue.edu/newsroom/purduetoday/releases/2019/Q1/howard,-harwood-honored-with-university-teaching-awards.html.

 

 

Visiting Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the University of the Pacific Elham (Ellie) Sayyad Abdi

(Ellie) Sayyad Abdi

Visiting Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the University of the Pacific Elham (Ellie) Sayyad Abdi will present “Immigrants: An Information Literacy Framework” at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 23 in Stewart Center, room 320, during her visit to Purdue University. The talk is open free to the public and is sponsored by the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies.

Abdi’s research focuses on uncovering the ways in which different populations conceptualize and engage with information. Her presentation will cover her Australian Research Council-funded study, which explores immigrants’ experiences with information and information literacy to enable them to learn the structure of the new environment, make informed choices, and become active and empowered participants of a new society.

Currently, Abdi is the Australian Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the University of the Pacific, California. She is an information researcher and working to pioneer the concept of information experience design (IXD), which is about designing and developing interventions for everyday life based on how people engage with information. Her research specifically examines the information experience among immigrant communities.

From 2014–18, Abdi served as an assistant professor in the School of Information Systems at Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

Abdi is a member of the Research Advisory Committee of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), chairs the LIS Education in Developing Countries Special Interest Group at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), regularly serves as a reviewer for various information journals, and serves on the program committees of various information conferences.

For more information about this event, contact Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Clarence Maybee at cmaybee@purdue.edu.

 

Courtesy of Purdue News Service

The public will have a chance to get a closer glimpse into Purdue alumnus Neil Armstrong’s life through an exhibit presented by Purdue Archives and Special Collections.

The free, public exhibition, “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers,” runs through Aug. 16 in the Purdue Archives and Special Collections, which is open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. It is located in Stewart Center inside the Humanities, Social Sciences and Education (HSSE) Library on the fourth floor of the library.

The exhibit commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first manned spaceflight that landed on the moon – where Armstrong took those famed first steps – and coincides with Purdue University’s July celebration of the moon landing, as well as the University’s sesquicentennial celebration, 150 Years of Giant Leaps.

Tracy Grimm, associate head of Archives and Special Collections and Barron Hilton Archivist for flight and space exploration conducts a tour of “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” exhibition. The exhibition is open from March 18 until Aug. 16. (Purdue University/ Mark Simons)

Tracy Grimm, associate head of Archives and Special Collections and Barron Hilton Archivist for flight and space exploration conducts a tour of “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” exhibition. The exhibition is open from March 18 until Aug. 16. (Purdue University/ Mark Simons)

“Neil wanted his collections to be used for both scholarship and research at his alma mater,” said Tracy Grimm, associate head of Purdue Archives and Special Collections and the Barron Hilton Archivist for Flight and Space Exploration, and curator of the exhibition. “Students and researchers have the unique opportunity to have a behind-the-scenes look at Neil’s life and legacy when they conduct research using Neil’s personal papers. This exhibition offers the public an opportunity to get to know Armstrong and the steps leading up to the Apollo 11 mission through access to Armstrong’s papers.”

The exhibition charts Armstrong’s experiences leading up to Apollo 11 mission, including training and coursework, planning for how and where to land on the moon, the success of the mission itself, and the impact it had on society. The following 11 items represent a portion of the items the public can expect to see on display at “Apollo in the Archives”:

  • An Apollo 11 flight suit, worn by Armstrong;
  • Armstrong’s NASA astronaut program acceptance letter;
  • A script for a skit written by Armstrong and Elliot See Jr., both part of the Gemini 5 backup crew;
  • A bag of Gemini 8 capsule personal items;
  • LLRV lunar lander research vehicle pilot flight checklist;
  • Apollo translunar/transearth trajectory plotting chart from the Apollo 11 mission;
  • Lunar dust disturbance on descent memorandum;
  • Model of Apollo lunar lander, made by the Grumman Corp;
  • Purdue centennial flag flown to the moon on Apollo 11 in 1969;
  • Apollo 11 lunar module lunar surface maps; and
  • Apollo 11 lunar module lunar ascent card.
A Purdue centennial flag that was flown to the moon on Apollo 11 in 1969 is just one of many items on display in “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers.” (Purdue University/Mark Simons)

A Purdue centennial flag that was flown to the moon on Apollo 11 in 1969 is just one of many items on display in “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers.” (Purdue University/Mark Simons)

In addition to the “Apollo in the Archives,” Purdue’s Ringel Gallery, in partnership with Archives and Special Collections, will present the exhibition “Return to Entry,” which will feature artwork inspired by Armstrong’s archival collection, March 25 to May 11, in the Ringel Gallery, Stewart Center. A reception and a panel discussion will be held at 5:30 on April 4.

For this exhibition, the artists’ challenge was to bring art, engineering, and science together to imagine new horizons informed by archival documents and artifacts contained in the Armstrong Papers and the papers of other astronauts and engineers. This exhibition will feature work by Frances Gallardo, Michael Oatman, and Jennifer Scheuer, who will be part of the panel discussion on April 4.

These exhibitions are one of many events celebrating Purdue’s Sesquicentennial, 150 Years of Giant Leaps. The yearlong celebration is highlighting Purdue’s remarkable history of giant leaps, while focusing on what giant leaps Purdue can take to address the world’s problems. The celebration concludes in October with an astronaut reunion.

Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

The Marshall and Susan Larsen Leaders Academy in the Krannert School of Management provides an ideal place for Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Associate Professor Ilana Stonebraker to teach Purdue students.

The Academy, according to its website, “provides high-achieving students with enhanced academic opportunities and learning experiences to help them become top performers in the world of business.” The program creates “a culture of achievement”—a phenomenon that Stonebraker, as an instructor of the Management 110 course offered to students in the Academy, not only fosters and sustains in her teaching, but also one she takes to heart in the pursuit of top performance in her own chosen field.

In Fall 2018, Stonebraker was among 12 faculty members inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy as a new Teaching Academy Fellow. She is the first ever Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty member to be inducted into the elite program, which recognizes Purdue faculty for their outstanding and scholarly teaching in graduate, undergraduate, or engagement programs. This recognition is just one among many honors Stonebraker has racked up over the last couple of years. In June 2018, she was one of 10 individuals selected by the Tippy Connect Young Professionals (TCYP) in the organization’s annual Top 10 Young Professionals Under 40 Award program. Last summer, she was recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) Library Instruction Roundtable as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. (She was recognized for the same thing in 2016 for a different article.) In early 2017, she was named a “Mover & Shaker” in Library Journal’s annual roundup that honors individuals making significant impacts in libraries and in education around the world. Last fall, too, she was elected to the Tippecanoe County Council (representing District 1).

While the accolades are rewarding, she noted, it is her work—like teaching the highly motivated students in the Larsen Leaders Academy—that really inspires her.

“I like to figure out where students are and help them build bridges to achieve their dreams, to help them imagine and then try things they never would have imagined themselves doing before,” she explained. “One of the ways I do this is through encouraging them to explore the ways they use information in their decision-making processes.”

Stonebraker has been at Purdue since 2012, and she has been teaching in Krannert since 2013. In addition to her teaching course load, she serves as one of Purdue Libraries’ business information specialists in the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics. She also researches how individuals use information in their studies and in their work and applies the knowledge she gains from that in her teaching.

“That is how I introduce myself to my students. I tell them, ‘I teach information literacy, and I research how people use information. Based on that, I can teach you skills that others cannot teach you here at Purdue,'” she explained. “Knowing how to use and apply information is increasingly important in a 21st-century economy. People in business, particularly, need to know how to use and apply information quickly. That is basically data analytics.”

Stonebraker is among several Libraries faculty who either teach or co-teach credit courses at Purdue in a variety of departments. She proudly points out that librarians tend to be highly engaged instructors who have been developing and practicing effective active-learning techniques and approaches to instruction for many years (perhaps even before “active learning” became an important practice in education).

“Librarians make interesting teachers because we think systematically about problems. Our brains are set up for inputs and outputs,” she added. “Our default is active learning. You can’t really teach students how to research and use information without actively engaging students in research and information use activities.”

Why I Love Purdue Libraries 2019

 

There are more than 150 ways to love Purdue University Libraries, and, to help celebrate Purdue University’s Sesquicentennial, we’re asking you to share your stories about some of the ways via the “Why I Love Purdue Libraries” annual video contest! Supported by the Purdue Federal Credit Union, the contest is open to all students on the West Lafayette campus. The deadline to enter is 11:59 p.m. Monday, April 15.

Each academic year since 2013, Purdue Libraries has opened the contest to Purdue University students on the West Lafayette campus and has awarded first, second, and third place prizes to the winning entrants.

First-place prize is $1,000; second-place prize is $750; and third-place prize is $500. Each submission must be from 1-3 minutes in length. Submissions will be evaluated by a team of student and full-time staff in Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies. Winning videos will be shared April 24, Purdue University’s 2019 Day of Giving.

For submission information and complete contest rules and guidelines, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/videocontest, or download the 2019 contest guidelines at https://bit.ly/2IV9rAo.

Below are the winning entries (first, second, third) for the 2017-18 academic year (the contest in 2017-18 focused on the Wilmeth Active Learning Center the first year it opened):


First Place: Cole Griffin and Anna Magner


Second Place: Jake Heidecker


Third Place (Tie): Matt Schnelker


Third Place (Tie): Jason Kelly