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‘Open_Access’ category

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded $750,000 to Purdue University to support a unique approach to research, scholarly publishing and communications on global grand challenges.

The approach at Purdue is unique in two ways. First, it catalyzes the involvement of humanists and social scientists in grand challenges research, innovation and policy formation. Next, it embeds publishing professionals, libraries faculty and policy experts in the scholarly communications process.

Mellon’s support of the program enables broadly interdisciplinary teams to tackle grand challenges in new ways, with expert assistance in communicating results directly to the public and key stakeholders (policymakers, not-for-profit organizations, and others), so that new research gets more swiftly and effectively out of the academy into the hands of people who need it.

The approach is designed to drive innovation in grand challenges research while facilitating change in scholarly publishing in order to achieve greater public value.

The Scholarly Publishing Division of the Purdue University Libraries, the Purdue Policy Research Institute in Discovery Park, the College of Liberal Arts and the Purdue Systems Collaboratory are all partners on the grant. Peter Froehlich, director of the Libraries’ Scholarly Publishing Division, and Laurel Weldon, director of the Purdue Policy Research Institute, will serve as principal investigators. This award follows on an earlier award of $539,000 from the Mellon Foundation in 2014.

“We’re excited to be receiving this new award from Mellon,” Froehlich said. “It’s vital for publishers and policy centers to have support like this to work with researchers to explore ways to short-circuit traditional approaches to scholarly communications. The new award is a strong endorsement of our collaborative approach to research and scholarly publishing at Purdue.”

Weldon agreed.

“Thanks to the previous support we received from Mellon and to our work with our partners on the grant across campus, PPRI has been able to develop a model for high-impact, interdisciplinary research. We look forward to sparking greater innovation in interdisciplinary research and scholarly communications through this project,” she said.

The majority of the grant funds will support competitively selected research projects.

Applicant teams can recruit members from any institution, but lead principal investigators must be faculty in the Purdue College of Liberal Arts.  At least one research faculty from a STEM field as well as one member of the Libraries’ faculty must be included on each team. Projects will be funded from January 1, 2017 through July 31, 2019.  The title of the project is “Breaking Through: Multidisciplinary Solutions to Global Grand Challenges.”

Details about applying, informational events and deadlines will be released soon.  Researchers can direct questions to Froehlich and Weldon at humstem@purdue.edu.

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Writer: Megan Huckaby, 765-496-1325, mhuckaby@purdue.edu

Sources: Peter Froehlich, 765-494-8251, pfroehli@purdue.edu

Laurel Weldon, 765-494-4185, weldons@purdue.edu

Purdue University Libraries has developed a new information literacy mission statement to guide students, faculty and staff in fostering successful learning at Purdue.

The new statement is:

“Purdue University Libraries’ research-based information literacy programming empowers Purdue’s diverse communities of learners to use information critically to learn and to create new knowledge, fostering academic, personal and professional success.”

The Libraries revisited the mission statement to align it more closely with campus goals for learning. Beginning in fall 2015, the mission statement was developed through an inclusive process that gathered input from stakeholders in the Libraries and focus groups with faculty across the University.

Libraries faculty and staff partner across the University community to integrate information literacy into the curriculum and beyond.

During the last fiscal year, the Libraries collectively worked with 19,481 students on many information literacy-related efforts to foster effective learning and decision-making skills. Libraries faculty also work directly in the planning stages of unique Purdue projects, such as developing innovative learning environments for students in the Purdue Polytechnic Institute and creating digital learning tools to teach Honors College students who are preparing to conduct original research.

Fundamental Libraries information literacy efforts include:

* Creation of the first endowed chair for information literacy, held by Sharon Weiner, professor of library science and the W. Wayne Booker Chair in Information Literacy.

* Libraries faculty teaming with other campus units and Purdue instructors to revamp courses through the IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation) program, and serving in key roles on the committees developing and implementing Purdue’s core curriculum.

* Libraries faculty working closely in planning and design of new Purdue projects in the Purdue Polytechnic Institute and Honors College.

* Libraries faculty and staff creating and implementing engaging activities to connect new Purdue students with the libraries during Boiler Gold Rush.

* University Libraries leading the academic research library profession in the development of data literacy education.

* The creation of a new Graduate Resource Information Portal (G.R.I.P.) to connect graduate students with the services and resources available through the Libraries.

The mission is grounded in research. The continued contributions to information literacy research by faculty have been highlighted in a bibliographic study conducted by researchers at the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

The extended version of the new mission statement is available on Purdue Libraries’ website.

For more information, contact Shannon Walker, director of strategic communication for Purdue Libraries, at walker81@purdue.edu or Clarence Maybee, assistant professor and information literacy specialist for Purdue Libraries, at cmaybee@purdue.edu.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Harvard Library and Purdue University Libraries collaborated in hosting a two-day data management symposium at Harvard on June 16-17. The focus of the symposium centered on new roles for libraries as part of data management strategies during all parts of the research cycle. Attendees came from across the country.

The Symposium incorporated visionary ideas, new concepts and inspirational speakers. The purpose was to promote data awareness and integration of library services into the research cycle, and to demonstrate that data management is not simply about compliance but also about building relationships and engaging stakeholders at all levels.

Well-managed data can allow researchers to develop new lines of inquiry that would not have been possible previously and to communicate their work in innovative ways; librarians can contribute to this effort.

“The agreement by Sarah Thomas, my counterpart at Harvard, to have Harvard Library collaborate with Purdue University Libraries on this symposium recognizes the high regard in which Purdue University Libraries is held for its leadership role in data management. I was very proud of the presentations and participation of my Purdue colleagues at the symposium,” said James L. (Jim) Mullins, dean of libraries and Esther Ellis Norton Professor at Purdue.

The symposium was planned by a joint committee made up of Harvard and Purdue individuals; from Purdue Libraries it included: Paul Bracke, associate dean for research and assessment; Scott Brandt, professor of library science and data specialist; and, Michael Witt, associate professor of library science and head, Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2).

Other faculty from Purdue who presented and participated were: Jeffrey T. Bolin, associate vice president for research centers, cores, and research development services and professor of biological sciences, Department of Biological Science; and Sylvie Brouder, professor of agronomy, College of Agriculture.

On June 18, a workshop was held that brought together groups from only Harvard and Purdue to explore in more detail specific challenges facing data management at the two universities. Purdue Libraries faculty and staff who presented at the workshop included: Amy Barton, assistant professor of library science and metadata specialist; Scott Brandt, professor of library science and data specialist; Marianne Stowell Bracke, associate professor of library science and agricultural sciences information specialist; Paul Bracke, associate dean for research and assessment; Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor of library science and physical and mathematical sciences information specialist; Line Pouchard, assistant professor of library science and data specialist and Michael Witt, associate professor of library science and head, Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2).

Contributors to the workshop from Purdue Libraries included: Carly Dearborn, digital preservation and electronic records archivist; Nicole Kong, assistant professor of library science and GIS specialist; Megan Sapp Nelson, associate professor of library science and data information literacy specialist; and Pete Pascuzzi, assistant professor of library science and molecular biosciences information specialist.

Full details on the symposium can be found at: http://library.harvard.edu/harvard-purdue-data

Contact: Shannon Walker, 765-496-9610, walker81@purdue.edu

Provost Deba Dutta and Dean of Libraries Jim Mullins presented the “Leadership in Open Access Award” to Purdue’s Department of Psychological Sciences, College of Health and Human Sciences, led by Professor Christopher Agnew, Department Head of Psychological Sciences.

The award was given in recognition of the department’s leadership in depositing all scholarly communication and publications into Purdue e-Pubs, helping to advance the impact of scholarship and research globally.

“In the tradition of the land-grant university, Dr. Agnew has embraced open access and made available to the world the important research and publications of the Department of Psychological Sciences,” said Provost Deba Dutta.

“Purdue e-Pubs is a very useful mechanism for disseminating our research findings far and wide, beyond only academic outlets,” said Department Head Dr. Christopher Agnew. “Purdue e-Pubs provides a valuable, user-friendly forum for both researchers and consumers of research.  Researchers in my department saw the benefits of Purdue e-Pubs as an easy-to-use open access repository for increasing the access and exposure of their work.”

Open Access week, held October 20-24, 2014 this past year, is an international event bringing awareness to open access. Purdue Libraries celebrates and encourages authors (particularly academic faculty) to participate as they can.

Purdue e-Pubs, one of three institutional repositories as part of Purdue University Libraries, provides free global online access to Purdue-affiliated articles, reports, conference proceedings, student scholarship, and more. Purdue e-Pubs also provides online publishing support for original publications.

Measuring and reporting impact is an important part of the Purdue e-Pubs service model. As well as having all content indexed in Google Scholar, Purdue e-Pubs uses Google Analytics to gather qualitative information. The repository also issues automatic monthly download notifications to authors, allowing authors the opportunity to demonstrate the reach of their scholarship, not only to academic colleagues and administrators, but to taxpayers, policymakers and media outlets.

To date, every college on Purdue’s West Lafayette campus has a presence in the repository.  Purdue e-Pubs continues to be a central place on campus advancing the impact of scholarship at the global, national and local level. Purdue University Libraries began providing the Purdue e-Pubs service to the campus community in 2006 as a means to share research and scholarship in a stable, open, and citable format.

As the repository continues to garner more downloads and objects, faculty, staff and students are encouraged to consider adding their research and scholarship. For more information about Purdue e-Pubs and adding previously published items, contact Dave Scherer, scholarly repository specialist, Purdue University Libraries, at 49-48511 or dscherer@purdue.edu.

 

Past “Leadership in Open Access” Award Winners:

2013 –  Leadership in Open Access Award, Dr. Mark S. Lundstrom, in recognition of Dr. Lundstrom’s leadership in creating NanoHUB;   Open Access Education Award, Dr. Linda S. Bergmann, Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)

2012 –  Graduate Student Award in Open Access, Mel Chua of Engineering Education;  Leadership in Open Access Award, Professor Darcy Bullock, Joint Transportation Research Program

 

2011 –  Leadership in Open Access Award, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering;  Leadership in Open Access Award, Ian Bell, PhD., in recognition of broadening the reach of the Purdue’s Herrick Laboratories’ international conferences on compressor engineering, high performance buildings, and refrigeration and air conditioning

 

Writer: Shannon Walker, Purdue University Libraries, 765-496-9610, walker81@purdue.edu

 

 

 

 

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The Purdue University Research Repository (PURR) achieved significant milestones last month, celebrating over 100 open access dataset publications and 100 grants awards to Purdue researchers who have used PURR. In total, PURR has been included in the data management plans of over 1,000 grant proposals from principal investigators at Purdue.

PURR is a virtual collaboration space and institutional data repository that was developed for the campus research community by the Purdue University Libraries, the Office of Executive Vice-President for Research, and Information Technology at Purdue (ITaP).

It provides a solution for researchers who are writing and implementing data management plans, which are required by many federal funding agencies like the National Science Foundation. PURR also enables researchers to publish datasets with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and archive datasets in a secure, reliable digital repository. PURR also works in collaboration with the other institutional repositories at Purdue and can assist researchers to make both their research data and published scholarship openly available to serve the full spectrum of the Purdue community’s scholarly communication needs.

Any Purdue faculty member, graduate student, or staff can create a project in PURR, invite their collaborators to join it from other institutions, and share storage and tools to facilitate collaboration and data management.

 

EPUBS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With making published scholarship and research open access, how can one see the impact it makes beyond numbers and figures? This also asks the bigger question – Does making my scholarship and research open access actually make a global impact? At Purdue the answer is Yes. Through the Purdue e-Pubs readership activity map, Purdue authors can visually see the global impact their published scholarship and research makes by making their publications open access through the Purdue e-Pubs institutional document repository.

Built upon a Google maps platform, the readership activity map is a real-time visualization of full-text COUNTER compliant downloads happening from around the globe. Users who visit Purdue e-Pubs are greeted with the map from the repository’s homepage. After a short introduction the pins begin populating the map every time a download appears. The map informs users where the reader is located (city, state, country), the publication that was downloaded, and the series or collection the publication came from. Users also have the ability to click on a previously dropped pin to see the same information on that download. The map also informs users how many real-time full-text downloads have occurred since the map began playing through its time stamped download counter. Additionally, the map highlights the total number of papers, downloads, and the number of downloads in the past year from within the repository.

No matter the time of day, users are downloading documents from Purdue e-Pubs. “It could be the middle of the afternoon on Purdue’s campus, yet evening in Europe or the middle of the night in China, and downloads from readers are still happening in those locations. It’s mesmerizing to see the “pins” populating the map,” says Purdue University Dean of Libraries Jim Mullins. “The Purdue e-Pubs readership activity map effectively highlights the global impact Purdue makes through its support of open access.”

For more information about the Purdue e-Pubs repository, readership activity map, or adding your previously published scholarship and research to the repository, please contact Dave Scherer, scholarly repository specialist, at 765-494-8511 or dscherer@purdue.edu.

 

This week marks the 8th annual Open Access Week. Open Access week is a week-long global opportunity for the academic community to learn about the benefits of open access. Open access is the free immediate online access to the results of scholarly research and analysis. With so many groundbreaking discoveries and research findings occurring at Purdue University, there is one place on campus providing free global online access to this scholarship — the Purdue e-Pubs institutional document repository.  Continuing on its steady record pace, Purdue e-Pubs recently surpassed 8.0 million downloads and 40,000 objects.

These 40,000 objects have been critical to Purdue e-Pubs’ mission, to serve Purdue’s campus community by providing free global online access to Purdue scholarship and research. To date, every college on Purdue’s West Lafayette campus has a presence in the repository. Purdue e-Pubs continues to be a central place on campus advancing the impact of scholarship at the global, national and local level. Purdue University Libraries began providing the Purdue e-Pubs service to the campus community in 2006 as a means to openly share research and scholarship in a stable, open, and citable format.

Measuring and reporting impact is an important part of the Purdue e-Pubs service model.  As well as having all content indexed in Google Scholar, Purdue e-Pubs uses Google Analytics to gather qualitative information. The repository also issues automatic monthly download notifications to authors, allowing authors the opportunity to demonstrate the reach of their scholarship, not only to academic colleagues and administrators, but to taxpayers, policymakers, and media outlets.

As the repository continues to garner more downloads and objects, faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to consider adding their research and scholarship.  For more information about Purdue e-Pubs and adding additional previously published items, please contact Dave Scherer, scholarly repository specialist, Purdue University Libraries at 765-494-8511 or dscherer@purdue.edu.

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN — Energy sustainability and climate change are the focus of a new book, published by Purdue University Press in collaboration with Purdue’s Global Policy Research Institute (GPRI). The book, Understanding the Global Energy Crisis, provides timely insights into one of grand challenges of our time and will be a valuable source of up-to-date information for advanced-level students and policy makers. It represents a trans-Atlantic collaboration between Purdue and the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) with authors from both institutions, and is edited by Eugene D. Coyle and Richard A. Simmons. Professor Coyle, previously at DIT, is now Dean of the Military Technological College of the Sultanate of Oman, while Richard Simmons is Executive Director of Purdue’s Air Transport Institute for Environmental Sustainability.

As well as being published in print and commercial e-book formats, Understanding the Global Energy Crisis is being made freely available online (http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/purduepress_ebooks/29/). “The issues we face in energy supply and use are global ones,” explains volume co-editor Coyle, “Making this book freely available online allows anyone with an Internet connection to access high quality information, and will spark the innovative solutions the world needs to address these major challenges.” Open access availability has been made possible thanks to pledges of support from over 300 academic libraries from 24 countries, working through the Knowledge Unlatched (KU) consortium. The book is one of only 28 volumes selected for the pilot collection. Two of these are Purdue-published books, giving the University a major stake in this highly innovative, international, open access monograph project.

In addition to being launched at the Schowe House at Purdue, the home of GPRI, on April 1, the publication of the book is being celebrated in Ireland with an event at DIT opened by the Irish Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, Pat Rabbitte, TD on April 9.

For more information about Purdue University Press scholarly publishing initiatives, go to www.press.purdue.edu.

About Knowledge Unlatched (KU) Pilot Collection: 

Knowledge Unlatched is committed to creating a positive change in scholarly communication landscapes by helping libraries to share the costs of publishing high quality specialist scholarly books and making them available in Open Access. The Knowledge Unlatched (KU) Pilot Collection is the first step in creating a sustainable route to Open Access for Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS) books. KU’s Pilot Collection of 28 new books from 13 recognized scholarly publishers, including Purdue University Press, will become Open Access. Support from a minimum of 200 libraries willing to participate in the KU Pilot was required in order to achieve this goal. This target was exceeded by almost half, with close to 300 libraries from 24 countries joining KU in support of its shared cost approach to Open Access for specialist scholarly books.

About Purdue University Press:  

Dedicated to the dissemination of scholarly and professional information, Purdue University Press selects, develops, and distributes quality resources in several key subject areas for which its parent university is famous, including business, technology, health, veterinary medicine, and other selected disciplines in the humanities and sciences. As the scholarly publishing arm of Purdue University and a unit of Purdue Libraries, the Press is also a partner for university faculty and staff, centers and departments, wishing to disseminate the results of their research.

Related web sites:

www.press.purdue.edu

www.knowledgeunlatched.org

Open Access version Understanding the Global Energy Crisis:  http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/purduepress_ebooks/29/

Databib (http://databib.org) is a tool for helping researchers identify and locate online repositories of research data that has been online since April 2012. It was initially developed by Purdue University under the leadership of Professor Michael Witt, Libraries, Head of the Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2), in collaboration with Penn State University and with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States. Its international, multidisciplinary editorial board identifies, catalogs, and curates a searchable index of research data repositories.

The aim of this merger is to reduce duplication of effort and to better serve the research community with a single, sustainable registry of research data repositories that incorporates the best features of both projects.

 

re3data.org and Databib have agreed to the following five principles for successful cooperation:

1.    Openness: the metadata and the interfaces of the joint registry will be openly accessible. Metadata records will be made accessible under terms of the Creative Commons CC0 protocol;

2.    Optimal quality assurance: a two-stage workflow, with a first review of submissions by an international editorial board plus a second one for consistency, will guarantee the quality and currency of records;

3.    Development of innovative functionalities: cooperative development of new functionality for the joint registry and further integration with a global ecosystem of infrastructures that meet the needs of data-driven research and open science;

4.    Shared leadership: the joint registry will be lead by two representatives (one from each project) as equal partners;

5.    Sustainability: both projects will work together on a sustainable governance structure and a permanent infrastructure for the joint registry.

 

The joint registry will be operated under the name “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” with its editorial board retaining the name of Databib. Both registries have posted a Memorandum of Understanding on their respective websites and have exchanged metadata records in advance of fully merging their platforms and processes. By the end of 2015, the merged registry will become an imprint of DataCite and be included in its suite of services.

 

March 25, 2014

Dublin, Ireland; Karlsruhe, Germany; and West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

 

More Information:

Databib (http://databib.org) is a tool for helping researchers identify and locate online repositories of research data that has been online since April 2012. It was initially developed by Purdue University in collaboration with Penn State University and with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the United States. Its international, multidisciplinary editorial board identifies, catalogs, and curates a searchable index of research data repositories.

 

Since early 2012, “re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories” (http://re3data.org) has been indexing research data repositories. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). re3data.org is funded from 2012 to 2015 by the German Research Foundation DFG.

DataCite (http://datacite.org) is a not-for-profit organization formed in London on December 1, 2009, with an aim to establish easier access to research data on the Internet, increase acceptance of research data as legitimate, citable contributions to the scholarly record, and support data archiving that will permit results to be verified and re-purposed for future study. To date, it has registered over 3 million datasets with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI).

 

 

 

 

In a recent  DC Telegraph post, Digital Commons announced that there are now more than one million open access, full-text objects available across Digital Commons member repositories.