Purdue University Libraries Purdue Logo Purdue Libraries
 Hours  |   My Account  |   Ask a Librarian Get Help Give to the Libraries

Posts tagged ‘graduate students’

On Thursday, May 23, a Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations was held at Purdue University. Ashlee Messersmith, manager, thesis/dissertation, The Graduate School at Purdue University, and Michael Witt, associate professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, organized the event, with support from the United States Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Association (USETDA).

By Michael Witt, Head, Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2), and Associate Professor of Library Science

"Purdue Graduate School Thesis and Dissertation Policy Changes: Giant Leaps Forward" at the Symposium on Electronic Dissertations and Theses May 23 in Purdue's Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Ashlee Messersmith (far left) and James L. Mohler, deputy chair, The Graduate School at Purdue, and professor in computer graphics technology (CGT), presented “Purdue Graduate School Thesis and Dissertation Policy Changes: Giant Leaps Forward” at the Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations May 23 in Purdue’s Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

The presenters at the Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) highlighted a wide variety of creative works produced by graduate students in earning their degrees, such as:

  • a newly discovered chemical structure with directions for building your own model of it using a 3D printer;
  • training materials for board game designers to help them write better instructions for teaching people how to play their games; and
  • an online map of the state of Indiana with embedded ecological data to improve natural resource management.

Graduate students will typically prepare and defend a written thesis, even if their research can be communicated in a more meaningful or impactful format than a document. There are other examples, such as software source code and research data, videos and photos from exhibits and performances, mixed media, dynamic websites, and much more produced by students; but this type of content is often left out of a traditional thesis.

Professor and Dean of Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Martin Halbert addressed the landscape and life cycle of electronic theses and dissertations, as well as the ETDPlus resource Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations on May 23 at Purdue University.

On May 23, Professor and Dean of Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Martin Halbert addressed the landscape and life cycle of electronic theses and dissertations, as well as the ETDPlus resource, at the Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations at Purdue University.

In some cases, these non-traditional works could be considered as the primary product of the students’ scholarship — without the need for a written thesis.

Recent changes to the policies of Purdue’s Graduate School reflect a progressive approach and support for non-traditional theses, embracing both the opportunities and challenges they present for the Purdue’s faculty, thesis office, and libraries.

“As emerging technologies continue to influence higher education, we needed to set a precedent through which students are permitted to express their creativity,” Messersmith explained. “Exploring these influences and their implications was the focus of the symposium, which was held in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. We invited experts to share ideas and brainstorm with participants who supervise theses and manage the processes and platforms for producing and archiving them.”

Guiding Graduate Students in Data Management in Practice

Michael Witt presented “Guiding Graduate Students in Data Management in Practice” at the ETD Symposium May 23 at Purdue. Witt’s presentation covered the Purdue University Research Repository (PURR), which helps university researchers plan and implement effective data management plans, share and manage their data with collaborators while the research is taking place, publish their data in a scholarly context, archive data for the long-term, and measure the impact of sharing their data.

The opening keynote presentation by Professor and Dean of Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Martin Halbert addressed the landscape and life cycle of electronic theses and dissertations, as well as the ETDPlus resource.

The closing keynote, delivered by Jean-Pierre Hérubel, professor, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, dove into the history and culture of the doctoral dissertation, as well as variations and transformations of its purpose and form.

Other presentations from Purdue faculty and staff explored issues related to student perspectives, digital humanities, graduate college policies, research data management, digital preservation, and scholarly publishing. Throughout the symposium, participants discussed important questions related to sharing current practices; interfacing with faculty to observe and respect local cultures related to credentialing students; identifying concerns and opportunities for graduate colleges, libraries, and technology providers; and increasing collaboration within the University and among universities. A lively round of lightning talks in the afternoon featured specific examples of theses that challenge conventions from other universities.

Presentation slides and collaborative notes from the symposium are available on Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies’ e-Pubs repository at https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/etdgiantleaps/.

 

Head of the Purdue Archives and Special Collections and Professor Sammie Morris (front row, far right) with her graduate students who compiled the "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" online exhibit. Students are (back row, L to R): Narim Kim, Erika Gotfredson, Lee Hibbard, Arielle McKee, and E. C. McGregor Boyle III; (front row, L to R): Maddie Gehling, Elise Robbins, and Dee McCormick.

Head of the Purdue Archives and Special Collections and Professor Sammie Morris (front row, far right) with her graduate students who compiled the “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives” online exhibit. Students are (back row, L to R): Narim Kim, Erika Gotfredson, Lee Hibbard, Arielle McKee, and E. C. McGregor Boyle III; (front row, L to R): Maddie Gehling, Elise Robbins, and Dee McCormick.

Every story has untold pieces. Purdue University Archives and Special Collections contains millions of stories in the many papers, books, objects, items, and other memorabilia carefully preserved and stored there. Yet, it does not hold them all—particularly those that may have not been “judged to be…important,” as noted in the introduction of the new online exhibit, “Voices, Identities & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in Purdue Archives.”

The exhibit is the result of a graduate course led by Purdue University Archivist and Professor Sammie Morris this past spring semester.

The exhibit’s introduction notes that Purdue’s past, present, and future are comprised of much more than stories about feats associated with its engineering programs, its tales about athletic teams, or its strides in agricultural research and practice. It also explains why the student curators took on this effort:

[N]ot all of this history is (or will be) preserved in the University’s archive. Inevitably, some people and events are judged to be more important and thus more worthy of preservation. Our exhibit, then, aims to focus attention on elements of Purdue’s history that have been otherwise overlooked, not in order to ‘correct’ that history but rather to expand it and (if our aim is true) change our understanding of what ‘counts’ as that history in the first place. — Voices, Identities & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in Purdue Archives

According to Morris, the idea for the course coincided with Purdue University’s faculty and staff members’ preparation for Purdue’s Sesquicentennial.

“As Purdue’s 150th anniversary approached, I often found myself reflecting on how the history of Purdue is preserved in the Archives, but not completely. There are many hidden gaps or silences representing people in Purdue history whose stories have not been widely known,” Morris said. “I began thinking about ways to fill in gaps in Purdue history, while engaging students in learning archival research skills.”

Erika Gotfredson shares her thoughts about the work she did for the "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" online exhibit. Gotfredson researched and composed "Title IX in the 1970s," and in her research she found a Sept. 4, 1974, article in The Exponent that "the newly formed women’s intercollegiate athletics program had released a female 'insignia,' or mascot, intended to represent the emerging female athletes," Gotfredson explains in the exhibit. "Criticism of Polly Purdue emerged a single day after her drawing appeared in the Exponent. On September 5th, the Exponent staff published this piece entitled 'Polly Purdue must go, insult to women' in the 'Opinion/Viewpoint' section of the paper." Read more at http://1350-omeka.cla.purdue.edu/s/investigating-150-years/page/title-ix-in-1970s

During a private reception highlighting the online exhibit project, Erika Gotfredson shared her thoughts about the work she did for the “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives.” Gotfredson researched and composed “Title IX in the 1970s,” and, in her research, she found a Sept. 4, 1974, article in The Exponent that shared news about how “the newly formed women’s intercollegiate athletics program had released a female ‘insignia,’ or mascot, intended to represent the emerging female athletes,” Gotfredson explains in the exhibit. “Criticism of Polly Purdue emerged a single day after her drawing appeared in the Exponent. On September 5th, the Exponent staff published this piece entitled ‘Polly Purdue must go, insult to women’ in the ‘Opinion/Viewpoint’ section of the paper.” Read more in her part of the exhibit at http://1350-omeka.cla.purdue.edu/s/investigating-150-years/page/title-ix-in-1970s.

The course, too, coincided with Purdue Libraries’ expansion of its teaching mission through the creation of the new “Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies.”

“With digital humanities being one area the new school focuses on, the course offered the right opportunity to teach digital scholarship methods while providing students the opportunity to delve into Purdue’s lesser-known history,” Morris explained. “The overarching goal for students was to learn how to conduct archival research, but the broader goal was to benefit from the results of their research projects by highlighting diversity in Purdue’s past. Students in the course were encouraged to consider the identity of Purdue and how their experiences as students today are preserved. Students learned how the records of their experiences (that are preserved in the Archives) become sources of study for scholars in the future.”

Lee Hibbard, a third-year Ph.D. student in the Purdue Department of English studying rhetoric and composition, said the title of the exhibit came about as the students "played with the theme of the course and our process of research, as well as what we wanted viewers to take away from the exhibit."

Lee Hibbard, a third-year Ph.D. student in the Purdue Department of English studying rhetoric and composition, said the title of the exhibit came about as the students “played with the theme of the course and our process of research, as well as what we wanted viewers to take away from the exhibit.”

Students in Morris’ class each focused on an individual era and/or topic in Purdue’s history, and the contents covered in the online exhibit are the result of each student’s work. For instance, Lee Hibbard, a third-year Ph.D. student in the Purdue Department of English studying rhetoric and composition, focused on queer life in the 2000s at Purdue.

“The work on the exhibit was entirely collaborative, with every person taking on distinct roles both on the front and back end of the exhibit’s appearance and contents,” Hibbard explained. “To come up with the title, we took a portion of class time and brainstormed some ideas together. The title came about as we played with the theme of the course and our process of research, as well as what we wanted viewers to take away from the exhibit. The wording was especially important to us as Purdue students wanting to tell a coherent narrative that depicted our goals for the exhibit, as well as the things we took away from the course as a whole,” he added.

“The three core pieces of archival work we focused on—voices, identities, and silences—became the first part of the title. The second half emphasized our process, which was very much a journey of going through the archives with an eye towards investigating diversity, rather than discovering,” Hibbard continued. “Discovery has an end point while Investigation is a process, and even though we all uncovered many interesting and fascinating examples of diversity, all of us felt by the end of the course that we had just scratched the surface of our areas, and could easily return to them to try and learn more.”

Hibbard, who is also interested in archival practices, noted that he found this course essential to unpacking the complex ideas he had for his dissertation.

“At the beginning of the semester, I knew I wanted to look at some archival things, but didn’t have the tools to do so. After a spring of reading complex theory, getting hands-on archival experience, and learning the importance of selection and curation in an exhibit setting, I feel more comfortable with the prospect of working with archives for my dissertation and my future scholarship as a whole,” he said.

Like his fellow students in the course, Hibbard chose to home in on a specific area of Purdue’s history because of his personal stake and interest in the selected topic and era.

“As a queer person, specifically a transgender man, I am very interested in the way support and networks for queer students developed at Purdue during the time that I was an undergraduate (2006-2010) at a similar large Midwestern university (University of Nebraska in Lincoln),” he explained.

Shortly before the end of the Spring 2019 semester, students in Morris’ course shared their personal stories about their work on the exhibit at a small, private reception held in the Archives and Special Collections. Below are more photos from that reception.

 

Dee McCormick, E. C. McGregor Boyle III, and Elise Robbins, listen to Narim Kim as she discussed her work on the "Foreign Teaching Assistants in the 1980s" part of the "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" online exhibit.

L to R: Dee McCormick, E. C. McGregor Boyle III, and Elise Robbins listen to Narim Kim (far right) as she discussed her work on the “Foreign Teaching Assistants in the 1980s” part of the “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives” online exhibit.

Maddie Gehling's part of "Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives" focused on "Women’s Leadership in the 1890s." In her archival research, Gehling found that Agnes Eugenie Vater served as the very first editor-in-chief of The Purdue Exponent "(the university’s student newspaper), the first edition of which was printed in December 1889."

Maddie Gehling’s part of “Voices, Identities, & Silences: Investigating 150 Years of Diversity in the Purdue Archives” focused on “Women’s Leadership in the 1890s.” In her archival research, Gehling found that Agnes Eugenie Vater served as the very first editor-in-chief of The Purdue Exponent “(the university’s student newspaper), the first edition of which was printed in December 1889.” Vater was the only who woman who served on the board of editors for the 1891 edition of the Debris, Purdue University’s now-defunct yearbook. Read more at http://1350-omeka.cla.purdue.edu/s/investigating-150-years/page/womens-leadership-in-1890s.