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Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies News

U.S. Declassified Documents Online – HSSE Featured Database

July 22nd, 2021

Humanities, Social Science and Education Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring U.S. Declassified Documents Online, brought to you by Gale.

Link: http://purl.lib.purdue.edu/db/USDDO

Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: This database is Gale resource that provides access to previously classified federal documents from the twentieth and twenty-first century. It features several kinds of materials, including intelligence studies, policy papers, diplomatic correspondence, and domestic surveillance reports. New documents are added as editors constantly monitor newly released materials.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of using U.S. Declassified Documents Online.

Why you should know this database: This database provides immediate access to a broad range of previously classified federal records spanning the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The collection brings together the most sensitive documents from all the presidential libraries and numerous executive agencies in a single, easily searchable database.

Quick tip: At the top right side of the screen, you will find a button called Cite. If you click on this button, another window will appear that will allow to you cut and paste the citation to your bibliography using one of several citation styles. However, always be sure to review the citation to see that everything is correct. There may be occasional errors.

Related Resources:

Another database you might want to explore is:

ProQuest Congressional Publications: https://guides.lib.purdue.edu/db/pqcp
GOVInfo: Discovering U.S. Government Information: https://guides.lib.purdue.edu/db/db221


Featured Database: Investext

July 13th, 2021

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring Investext, within the Mergent database, brought to you by the London Stock Exchange.

Focus

Investext provides a comprehensive overview of a company and includes key fundamentals, the latest transactions, the latest five deals, research reports, news and significant developments, and the top five shareholders.

Access

The List of Business Databases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue Career Account.

Tutorial

Click Getting Started with Investext to see the basics of using the Investext database.

Related Resources

Some other resources you might want to explore are:

  • Mergent Online, includes financial statements, company news, industry analysis, historical information on M&A activity, and more.
  • Morningstar Investment Research Center, offers up-to-date information on 20,000 stocks and mutual funds and allows screening using a variety of criteria.

Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.


Art Full-Text – HSSE Featured Database

June 29th, 2021

Humanities, Social Science and Education Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring Art Full-Text, brought to you by EBSCO.

Link: https://guides.lib.purdue.edu/db/aft

Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue login and password.

Focus: A comprehensive resource for art information from more than 900 periodicals, including 280 peer-reviewed journals, as well as indexing and abstracting of over 13,000 art dissertations. Researchers can track the careers of artists and review their materials and methods, and find books by and about artists, as well as interviews, profiles, and much more. Indexing of art reproductions helps users find virtually any work of interest—including works by emerging artists—as well as examples of styles and movements in art.

Tutorial: Click here see the basics of using Art Full-Text.

Why you should know this database: This database features full-text articles from over 300 periodicals dating back to 1995. You can also find an index of nearly 200,000 art reproductions, providing examples of various styles and movements, including emerging artists.

Quick tip: To the right side of the Detailed Record screen, there is a button called “Cite.” This will bring up a list of various citation styles. You can select the style that you need, then cut and paste the citation to your bibliography. However, do double check the citation. Sometimes, there might be slight errors.


Related Resources:

Another database you might want to explore is:

Oxford Art Online: https://guides.lib.purdue.edu/db/oxfordart
Gale OneFile: Fine Arts: https://guides.lib.purdue.edu/db/gppfa


Enriching Our World with Photography and Coffee Table Books

June 21st, 2021

We’re partial to words ourselves, but some subjects are just better in pictures. If you’re a photography enthusiast or just have an empty coffee table in need of a beautiful book, we’ve got a great list of photo books for you to skim through.


A Round Indiana: Round Barns in the Hoosier State, Second Edition

by John T. Hanou

A Round Indiana documents the 266 round barns identified in the history of Indiana, containing more than 300 modern and historical photographs alongside nearly 40 line drawings and plans. Author and award-winning photographer John T. Hanou combed through often-forgotten documents to tell the fascinating story of the farmers, builders, and architects who championed the innovative construction techniques.

 

A Place Called Turkey Run: A Celebration of Indiana’s Second State Park in Photographs and Words

by Daniel P. Shepardson

A Place Called Turkey Run captures the majesty and mystique of Indiana’s second state park in text and hundreds of full-color images. The work is organized into six distinct photo essays on the park’s beauty: sandstone; bluffs and canyons; flowing water; snow and ice; tall trees; and flowers, ferns, and fungi.

Make sure to check out its companion volume Photographing Turkey Run: A Guide to Nature Photography.

 

Purdue at 150: A Visual History of Student Life

by David M. Hovde, Adriana Harmeyer, Neal Harmeyer, and Sammie L. Morris

Purdue at 150 tells Purdue’s story through rare images, artifacts, and words. Authors culled decades of student papers, from scrapbooks, yearbooks, letters, and newspapers to historical photographs and memorabilia preserved in the Purdue University Libraries Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections.

 

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Through Astronaut Eyes: Photographing Early Human Spaceflight

by Jennifer Levasseur

Featuring over seventy images from the heroic age of space exploration, Through Astronaut Eyes presents the story of how human daring along with technological ingenuity allowed people to see the Earth and stars as they never had before.

 

Memories of Life on the Farm: Through the Lens of Pioneer Photographer J. C. Allen

by Frederick Whitford and Neal Harmeyer

Memories of Life on the Farm contains over 900 picturesque images, most never-before-seen, of men, women, and children working on the farm, which remain powerful reminders of life in rural America at the turn of the twentieth century. The J. C. Allen photographs represent an historical account of the transition from pioneer practices to scientific methodologies in agriculture and rural communities.

 

Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family: A Photo History of Indiana’s Early County Extension Agents

by Frederick Whitford, Neal Harmeyer, and David M. Hovde

Enriching the Hoosier Farm Family captures the story of the state’s first Extension agents in archival photos and words, when Extension was an idea and county agents were folks who traveled muddy back roads visiting farmers day after day, year after year.


You can get 30% off all Purdue University Press titles by entering the code PURDUE30 at checkout on our website.


Featured Database: Gale Business Entrepreneurship

June 8th, 2021

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring the Gale Business: Entrepreneurship, brought to you by Cengage.

Focus

Gale Business: Entrepreneurship is a portal for entrepreneurs containing business plans, entrepreneurial articles, small business forms and related information, including small business encyclopedias.

Access

The List of Business Databases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue Career Account.

Tutorial

Click Getting Started with Gale Business: Entrepreneurship to see the basics of using the Gale Business: Entrepreneurship database.

Why Should I Know About This?

Gale Business: Entrepreneurship covers all aspects of starting and running a business, including accounting, finance, human resources, management, marketing, tax, and more and includes a variety of media types such as directories, magazine articles, videos, and websites.

Related Resources

Some other resources you might want to explore are:

  • Business Source Complete, Indexes and abstracts articles in business and management, marketing, MIS, accounting, finance, international business, and related disciplines.
  • Gale Business Plan Builder, a step-by-step online planning tool for starting, managing and optimizing a business or nonprofit.

Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.

 


Balkan Legacies: A Q&A with Balázs Apor and John Paul Newman

June 7th, 2021

We talked to Balázs Apor and John Paul Newman, the editors of Balkan Legacies: The Long Shadow of Conflict and Ideological Experiment in Southeastern Europe.

Balkan Legacies is a study of the aftermath of war and state socialism in the contemporary Balkans. The authors look at the inescapable inheritances of the recent past and those that the present has to deal with.


Q: What was your main motivation for starting this project as editors?

Balázs Apor: The book was the product of a conference in Dublin that addressed the broad themes of memory and identity in Central and Eastern Europe. The conference had several excellent papers that focused on Southeastern Europe and reflected on very similar themes: the legacies of war and communism in the region. It seemed to us like an obvious decision to bring those papers together in a volume in which these issues are analyzed more systematically. We also wanted to offer a comprehensive coverage of the region, so we invited additional experts to contribute. We felt that academic publications on historical legacies in the Balkans either focus on the legacy of wars or the legacy of the communist dictatorship, but they rarely address the two jointly. The primary motivation behind the volume is to offer a joint discussion of the two formative legacies of the 20th Century in the Balkans and explore how they interact with each other.

John Paul Newman: It is exactly as Balazs says – we had organized this large conference in Dublin, and in the aftermath sat down together in a pub and discussed what impressed us about the many papers that we had heard. It was clear that there was some excellent work by established and early career scholars on the many aftermaths of conflict and socialism in the region. It was also clear to us that there existed a kind of Gordian memory knot: that people had certain ideas and attitudes about war, and the Second World War especially, and that people also had a set of ideas and attitudes about socialism – that these attitudes were often entangled, conflicting, and that if we addressed these together we might learn something about the contemporary history of the region. That is what we have set out to do in the book.

 

Q: This volume is titled Balkan Legacies, and you make effort in the introduction of the book to talk about the concept of “legacy” and why you’re exploring it, could you explain that some here?

Apor: The concept of “legacy” is an elusive one. It is used very often in academic discussions, but its meaning is often left vague. There are very few attempts to define what “historical legacy” actually means and how can scholars study them. Our goal with the book was to tap into the literature on historical legacies and offer a contribution to academic debates on the term. In our interpretation, legacies denote structures, ideas, trends, themes, and so on, that revive or endure after radical breaks in history. We also argue for the importance of studying different legacies jointly in order to be able to appreciate the myriad of ways in which they interact with each other. The recent history of Southeastern Europe – or the Balkans – is probably the best case to illustrate this point. The legacies of wars and dictatorships (communist or otherwise) fundamentally shaped social and political developments in the Balkans in the past century and they continue to exert an influence on contemporary societies.

Newman: I suppose we liked the way the idea of ‘legacies’ suggested deeper historical and institutional inheritances. Deeper, that is, than the usual ideas about the past that are articulated in the public sphere in Southeastern Europe. Here, war and socialism are of course extremely important topics, hot button issues in politics, culture, the media, as many of our contributors point out. But often what is said in public is at odds with the historical reality: present-day politicians, for example, are quick to disavow the socialist period in toto, to claim that the period was a parenthetical departure from the true course of the nation, or to claim that if there are still vestiges, this has to do with an ‘unfinished revolution’ that they and they alone can bring to completion. This is a far too common and far too superficial way of interpreting the past, and part of the choice behind the legacies concept was to show another way of thinking about these important issues.

 

BALKAN LEGACIES is available June 15, 2021.

 

Q: You also mention the effects of both long-lasting legacies (institutions, policies, behaviors, and attitudes) and short-term events (revolutions, wars, and violent coups d’état) on societies and legacies. What makes this volume’s take on this somewhat novel?

Apor: In the literature on historical legacies there is a tendency to focus on structures, institutions and long-term developments or phenomena. We argue that short-term events, including revolutions and wars may produce equally significant and enduring legacies. The book contains a healthy balance of case studies focusing on the legacies of short-terms events (wars) and chapters discussing the legacies of enduring structures (dictatorships). The collection of essays should provide the reader with an insight into how different types of legacies function and how they interact with each other.

Newman: Braudel and the doyens of the Annales School would be turning in their grave! But it is true: so many studies of Southeastern Europe have thought in terms of long-term economic, social, and cultural development, and related many of these to the legacies of the Ottoman empire. Of course the Ottoman empire is central to the history of the region, just as it is central to Europe more generally (and to North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia). But we also wanted to show that the complex legacies of more recent conflict and political projects were also central to the way Southeast European societies have taken shape in the 21st century. One of our points of departure was Tony Judt’s opus of European history since the end of the Second World War ‘Postwar’, in which he argues that the shadow of that conflict remained over Europe throughout the Cold War and beyond. We wanted to try to push that premise further in Southeastern Europe, asking that, if this was true, how would it manifest in a region that experienced civil conflict, invasion, occupation, revolution, in the course of these years.

 

Q: How is this volume organized and what are some of the specific subjects covered?

Apor: The volume consists of five thematic parts. The first part contains chapters reflecting on the legacies of wars with an emphasis on the legacy of World War II in Croatian nation-building, the use of the hajduk tradition in Serbian politics at the time of the Yugoslav succession wars, and the Civil War in Greece. The second and third parts of the book collect chapters addressing the legacies of communism. Part 2 focuses primarily on the political sphere in Romania, Albania and Bulgaria whereas the emphasis in Part 3 is on everyday practices and objects (holidays, song contests and Tito memorabilia) that often evoke nostalgic sentiments in present-day societies. Part 4 highlights the role of non-communist legacies in the Balkans with case studies reflecting on monarchical legacies in Bulgaria, the antiquisation campaign in Macedonia, and the importance of (purged) books in attempts to create a usable past in Croatia. The last part of the book focuses on the legacies of war and communism in minority groups, such as diaspora and ethnic minority communities, and disabled people.

Newman: I remember that this was one of the hardest parts of editing this book. We had such an amazing range of scholars, approaching our central questions from such a range of disciplines, and with such a range of topics, too. It was on us as editors to craft this into a thematically coherent book. I hope we have achieved this!

 

Q: What do you want someone reading of to leave with a better understanding of, or, what is the main goal of this project?

Apor: The main goal of this project is to highlight the complexity of historical legacies in the Balkans. Legacies may be short-term or longer-term, they may be invisible and un-reflected and they often interact with each other in a multiplicity of ways.

Newman: Obviously I hope the reader will understand that war and socialism have left important and enduring legacies on the region! But I hope they will understand that this has not happened monolithically, that societies are experiencing these legacies in very different ways, depending on a range of intersectional variables, geography, age, gender, race, religion, and so on. I hope too that, if they didn’t know this plain fact before, they will understand something of the social and cultural vibrancy of the region. Perhaps the reader will be introduced to the ideas and the work of scholars they had not known about before.


Thank you to Balázs Apor and John Paul Newman! If you would like to know more about this book you can order your own copy or request it from your local library.

You can get 30% off this title and any other order by entering the code PURDUE30 when ordering from our website.


Introducing the New Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Information Science (GIS) from Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies

May 20th, 2021

West Lafayette, IN- Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies is pleased to announce the launch of the new Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Information Science (GIS). Geospatial information plays an increasingly important role in many cutting-edge industries, including agriculture, engineering, environmental science, disaster recovery, health, social science, and digital humanities. The U.S. Department of Labor has defined geospatial technologies as one of the major areas of job growth in the coming decade, with a recent survey showing that the average salary for people with related GIS certification is $10k more than those who do not.

The Libraries’ Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Information Science will provide a systematic training program in the area of geospatial information application, analysis, and management for post-baccalaureate students of all disciplines. The program will help students secure fundamental knowledge and skills in acquiring, integrating, analyzing, evaluating, and managing geospatial information across multiple disciplines, in addition to exploring advanced topics in their own application areas. 

To earn the certificate, students will be required to take four 3-credit courses from a collection of multi-disciplinary courses divided into four categories: introduction, advanced topics, applications, and a project-based practice course. These courses were chosen from departmental offerings across campus via a thorough vetting process that involved multiple interviews and workshops with instructors and stakeholders, with the goal of identifying a complete (yet flexible) learning system for students to gain the best systematic GIS training Purdue University can offer.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to speak with their advisors or reach out to the Libraries’ GIS instructional Coordinator, Yue (Shirley) Li at li1050@purdue.edu for more information.


Libraries Summer Operations Update

May 13th, 2021

Following a year of restricted access to print materials out of public health guidance and an abundance of caution, on Monday, May 17th, 2021, access to Purdue Libraries’ physical collections will be restored. All library users will once again be able to browse and access the stacks.

Purdue faculty, staff, and students who work and learn remotely will continue to have the option to have requested items mailed to them. As a result of removing all access restrictions to our physical collections, HathiTrust Emergency Temporary Access will end per our terms of service. On May 17th, links to all copyrighted items made electronically accessible via this service (labeled Temporary Access in our catalog) will be removed. Because Purdue University is a HathiTrust member, our users will continue to have full viewing access to HathiTrust items in the public domain and titles available through Creative Commons licensing via https://www.hathitrust.org by logging in with their Purdue login name and password.

During the summer semester, some libraries may operate on different or reduced schedules. For the latest library hours, please visit: https://www.lib.purdue.edu/hoursList.


Eleanor Roosevelt, The Jewish Plight, and the Founding of Israel: Q&A with John F. Sears

May 13th, 2021

We talked to John F. Sears, the author of Refuge Must Be Given: Eleanor Roosevelt, the Jewish Plight, and the Founding of Israel, about his motivations for writing the book, some of the new subjects the books covers, and some other aspects of Eleanor Roosevelts legacy.

Refuge Must Be Given details the evolution of Eleanor Roosevelt from someone who harbored negative impressions of Jews to become a leading Gentile champion of Israel in the United States.


Q: What brought this part of Eleanor Roosevelt’s legacy to your attention, and what motivated you to write a book on it?

John F. Sears: When I was associate editor of the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project, I helped edit ER’s correspondence from the period 1945 through 1948. In letters she exchanged with President Harry Truman and Secretary of State George Marshall in 1948 about the Truman administration’s position on the future of Palestine, I was struck by how passionately she advocated on behalf of the plan adopted by the UN to partition Palestine into a Jewish and an Arab state. ER strongly objected to the Truman administration’s plan in March to pursue the establishment of a UN trusteeship for Palestine when the British mandate came to an end in May rather than push immediately for the implementation of the partition plan. I wanted to know the origins of her commitment to partition and of her devotion to Israel once it was established.

 

Q: Though Eleanor Roosevelt is perhaps the most studied and popular first lady in American history, this part of her legacy has received little attention. Why do you think that is?

Sears: Good question. In the case of American refugee policy and the Holocaust, historians have focused extensively on FDR and the response of his administration. While they have noted (usually very briefly) that Eleanor Roosevelt advocated on behalf of refugees, she has been treated as a peripheral actor on this issue. In the case of the future of Palestine and Israel, liberals at the time were generally supportive, even enthusiastic about Israel’s founding and accomplishments. Politics have changed since the occupation of the West Bank, and many liberals today are critical of Israel. Perhaps that ER harbored stereotypes of Jews fairly late into her life, embraced Israel uncritically, and was unsympathetic to the Arab political stance on Israel are, for some people, jarring to her image as a great humanitarian. I myself found these topics challenging to deal with.

 

Decorative picture of book cover

 

Q: Eleanor Roosevelt certainly wasn’t always a champion of Judaism or Jewish people, as her views changed drastically over the course of her life. Why is understanding this evolution important in understanding her?

Sears: Eleanor Roosevelt grew up in an antisemitic society and absorbed the social antisemitism of her class. She gradually shed these attitudes as she worked closely with Jewish colleagues in addressing political and social issues. But even after she began campaigning against antisemitism, she continued to harbor stereotypes of Jews and to share the view that there was a “Jewish problem” that could be mitigated if Jews were distributed more widely geographically and among the professions. She does not appear to have completely shed this attitude until World War II or, perhaps, until the success of the Jews in establishing Israel created a different image of the Jew in American culture. But she firmly believed and repeatedly argued that everyone, whatever their religion, race, or ethnic background, was entitled to equal rights. She applied this principle to African Americans as well as to Jews.

ER was ahead of her time in many ways, including in her evolving attitude toward Jews. But it is important to understand that just as many Americans today have recently become more aware of how they continue to harbor racist stereotypes, despite their opposition to racism, ER’s rejection of antisemitism had not completely banished the old Jewish stereotypes from her consciousness. Prejudice is deeply embedded in our culture and not easily rooted out of our minds, even when we strive to do so.

 

Q: What are a few things that are being studied for the first time in this book?

Sears: Eleanor Roosevelt’s partnership with Clarence Pickett, executive director of the American Friends Service Committee, in advocating for the admission of more refugees, both Jewish and Christian, to the United States. The two of them also tried to educate the American public about the contributions refugees made to the country, and they sought to welcome refugees and care for them once they arrived in this country. As honorary chairman of the United States Committee for the Care of European Children, ER had a special concern for unaccompanied child refugees. She and Pickett also fought against antisemitism, which was rampant in the United States at the time.

Eleanor Roosevelt’s efforts to prod Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles to speed up the visa process and to facilitate the issuing of visas to applicants who were having difficulty obtaining one. Welles was widely seen as sympathetic to refugees, unlike most of his colleagues in the State Department, but he was captive to the bureaucratic system and to his own rigid personality. He failed to challenge his colleagues regarding the slowness of the visa process and insisted to ER that it was functioning well.

The evolution of Eleanor Roosevelt’s views on the future of Palestine and her ultimate commitment to the establishment of a Jewish state.

Eleanor Roosevelt’s attitude toward the Palestinian Arabs, who, she felt, had wrongly opposed the United Nations plan to partition Palestine into a Jewish and an Arab state. ER sympathized with the Arab refugees and advocated for their care and resettlement. She regarded the Arab refusal to recognize Israel, negotiate a peace, and resettle the refugees in other Arab countries, however, as the principal cause of ongoing conflict.

Eleanor Roosevelt’s role as World Patron of Youth Aliyah, the organization that brought unaccompanied children to Palestine and later Israel and trained them to become productive citizens and nation builders. ER traveled to Israel four times and toured Youth Aliyah training centers and youth villages. She was fascinated by the various educational strategies employed by Youth Aliyah to integrate newly arrived child immigrants into a unified national culture. She also raised funds for Hadassah, Youth Aliyah’s major sponsor, and visited Hadassah medical facilities when she was in Israel.

Eleanor Roosevelt’s warm relationship with Israel and admiration for its leaders. ER regarded the energy and innovative way Israel approached its own development and the education of children as a model for other newly independent nations to emulate. “There is no country as exciting as Israel,” she said.

 

Q: In an ideal world, how would you like this book to affect ER’s legacy?

Sears: I hope readers will continue to admire Eleanor Roosevelt for the extraordinary leader she was, but gain a more complete and complex understanding of her views and achievements, including her shortcomings. Throughout her career, ER partnered with American Jews in addressing issues she cared deeply about, including refugees, religious tolerance, the civil rights of African Americans, child welfare, public health, and human rights. ER’s devotion to Israel was in many ways the culmination of that career. Yet many people, including Jews, are unaware of ER’s role during the founding of Israel and her ongoing relationship with the new nation. I hope Refuge Must Be Given will illuminate this important chapter in ER’s long and productive life.


Thank you to John! If you would like to know more about this book you can order your own copy or request it from your local library.

You can get 30% off this title and any other order by entering the code PURDUE30 when ordering from our website.


Featured Database: EconLit

May 4th, 2021

Parrish Library’s Featured Database will give you a very brief introduction to the basic features of one of our specialized subscription databases. This time we’re featuring EconLit, brought to you by EBSCO Industries, Inc.

Focus

Produced by the American Economic Association, EconLit is the primary research tool in economics: economic development, forecasting, and history; fiscal and monetary theory; business and public finance; international, health care, regional and urban economics, and more.

Access

The List of Business Databases is the alphabetical list of the databases specially selected for those in a business program of study. Access the databases off-campus with your Purdue Career Account.

Tutorial

Click Getting Started with EconLit to see the basics of using the EconLit database. 

Why Should I Know About This?

EconLit provides bibliographic citations, with selected abstracts, of journal articles, books, dissertations and working papers, articles in collective works, conference proceedings, collected essay volumes and full text book reviews.

Related Resources

Some other resources you might want to explore are:


Featured Database comes to you from the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management & Economics. If you would like more information about this database, or if you would like a demonstration of it for a class, contact parrlib@purdue.edu. Also let us know if you know of a colleague who would benefit from this, or future Featured Databases.

Since usage statistics are an important barometer when databases are up for renewal, tell us your favorite database, and we will gladly promote it. Send an email to parrlib@purdue.edu.