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Dawn or Doom 2018; Purdue Libraries' EventsLearn how to communicate and present your research data for maximum impact through Purdue Libraries-sponsored events at Purdue University’s fifth annual Dawn or Doom Conference.

Join Data Designer Jennifer Lyons (Evergreen Data) for two sessions about effective data presentation Monday, Nov. 5. Details for each event are listed below. Please note that registration is required for the afternoon workshop.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. — “Presenting Data Effectively: Practical Methods for Improving Evaluation Communication” (presentation), Stewart Center 314
  • 3-6 p.m. — “Effective Data Visualization: Communicating Your Findings for Maximum Impact” (workshop), Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), B058

Registration is required for the workshop; register online at go.lib.purdue.edu/events/dawnordoom.

About Dawn or Doom

Celebrating its fifth year, Dawn or Doom explores the effects of rapidly emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence and genetic engineering, by bringing together leading national experts and stars from Purdue’s large constellation of researchers to kick-start conversations about potential risks and rewards. Learn more about the conference at www.purdue.edu/dawnordoom/.

 

 

David Zwicky, Purdue University Libraries

David Zwicky, Purdue University Libraries

Many at Purdue know about (and have likely benefited from using) Purdue University Libraries’ robust research resources (online and in print), as well as cutting-edge services (e.g., 3D printing, data visualization, data management, research and scholarly communication support… the list goes on). What some individuals may not completely understand, though: How Purdue University Libraries faculty members contribute to instruction, teaching, and learning at Purdue.

In addition to serving as instructors and co-instructors in courses across the disciplines and majors here at Purdue, Libraries’ faculty members also perform important liaison duties to help faculty in all disciplines connect their students to important and authoritative information in their respective fields.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll introduce you to the Purdue Libraries faculty liaisons and share a bit about what they each do in their librarian, instructor, liaison, and/or information specialist roles.

This week, we start by introducing David (“Dave”) Zwicky, assistant professor of library science and chemical information specialist at Purdue Libraries. His liaison responsibilities include the departments of chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials engineering. He is also a patent and trademark specialist, affiliated with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent & Trademark Resource Center (PTRC) program.

His work through the PTRC is an invaluable resource here at Purdue, particularly for those who are interested in patents and want to understand how they are and can be used in business and industry.

“Patents help you avoid repeating work other people have done, they can inspire new designs, and expired patents are pieces of technology that are in the public domain, free to be built upon and adapted,” explained Zwicky. They also let you know what technologies other companies are exploring (they’re a key part of competitive intelligence analysis). And, of course, if you can get a patent on your own invention, that’s incredibly powerful when you want to commercialize it,” he added.

Following is a brief overview, through a short Q&A, of how Professor Zwicky advances teaching and learning at Purdue, through his direct work with students and faculty.

Q. Tell me a bit about your background, what you do here as a faculty member in Purdue Libraries, and your role as the patent and trademark specialist in the Libraries.

Professor Zwicky: As the chemical information specialist, I work with folks in my liaison departments to support research, incorporate information literacy into courses, build collections, and just generally see that their information needs are met.

Before I became a librarian, I was actually a chemical engineer (with my B.S. and M.S. in the field), and I was on my way to a Ph.D., but I decided I couldn’t see myself working in the field. I had worked in my undergraduate university’s engineering library and I knew that STEM and library science could be complementary, so I switched over and got an master’s degree in library and information science. It’s been a great experience, and my two different areas of study and former career practice work really well together.

I’m also Purdue University’s representative to the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office’s PTRC (Patent & Trademark Resource Center) program. We’re an outreach organization affiliated with the USPTO, which tries to help people in our communities learn more about patents and trademarks. This usually means teaching students and entrepreneurs about the basics of the patent system and how they can do their own patent searching.

I do this through courses, through workshops, and through one-on-one consultations. Patents are a different beast than other forms of information, harder to search, and harder to use. One of my specialties is breaking them down and showing people how to work with them effectively. I’ve been a patent librarian for about nine years (at my last job and here at Purdue), and I’m currently the president of the PTRC Association (the professional group for PTRC reps).

Q. Why are patents important sources of information for faculty and student researchers?

Professor Zwicky: Patents are important for researchers for a few reasons. The big, obvious reason is that researchers might want to get patents of their own. If they invent something novel and useful, they may want to patent and commercialize it, which is great for both the researcher and for the University. That said, I really want to get people to think how patents can be useful beyond their entrepreneurial applications. Patents have the potential to give researchers insight into research and development that goes on outside of academia. If you’re working in industry and you invent something important, you may not write an academic article or present at a scholarly conference; you’re almost certainly going to apply for a patent. These publicly available documents dramatically expand the scope of the scientific literature, particularly in applied areas.

Q. Through you, how does Purdue Libraries and Purdue U. collaborate with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent and Trademark Research Center?

Professor Zwicky: The PTRC program is aimed at outreach. Personnel at the USPTO realize that entrepreneurs around the country need to know about intellectual property (especially independent inventors), and they know not everyone can come to the main patent office in Alexandria (Virginia). So they’ve set up this program, which links 80-odd libraries (public, government, and academic) from around the country with the USPTO and each other. If someone in our area has a need for a patent or trademark consultation, the USPTO can refer that individual to us for the basic level of training. In exchange, the Purdue Libraries get access to USPTO training and resources.

In practice, this means that I meet with people from Purdue, Lafayette, and West Lafayette, and our general area of Indiana and Illinois (the other PTRCs in our area are Chicago Public Library and Indianapolis Public Library) and talk to them about patents and trademarks. I am not a lawyer and I can’t answer any legal questions, but I can explain the overall process and show them the publicly available tools they can use to do their own searching. I also use what I’ve learned through this program to teach about intellectual property.

Q. What does it mean that you have liaison responsibilities with the Purdue departments of chemistry, chemical engineering and materials engineering?

Professor Zwicky: My liaison responsibilities mean I’m the point of contact for people in those departments (faculty, staff, and students) when they have information needs. Is there a book they think we should add to the Libraries’ collection? Do they need help finding a specific reference or doing a broader literature search? Do they want to incorporate information literacy into their courses? I’m here to help with all of that and more.

Q. How does patent research apply to the work you do with faculty and students teaching and learning in these disciplines/departments?

Professor Zwicky: Patents are particularly relevant in that last area of teaching and learning. Not only do students—especially students who are interested in pursuing careers outside of academia—need to know basic information about patents; patents represent an incredible opportunity for students to engage with information in a different way. Patents, among other applications, can be used as case studies, showing students how other people have tried to solve real-world problems, and they’re incredibly potent in the context of design courses.

Q. Why is it important for faculty and even student researchers to be aware of patents and trademark information? How can they become more knowledgeable about the importance of patents?

Professor Zwicky: Patents help you avoid repeating work other people have done, they can inspire new designs, and expired patents are pieces of technology that are in the public domain, free to be built upon and adapted. They also let you know what technologies other companies are exploring (they’re a key part of competitive intelligence analysis). And, of course, if you can get a patent on your own invention, that’s incredibly powerful when you want to commercialize it.

Trademarks are a little simpler and a little more niche. They’re vitally important in terms of marketing your company and making sure your customers can easily identify your goods and services, but they’re a bit less relevant in purely academic settings.

In terms of learning about patents and trademarks, contact me. I’m happy to set up one-on-one consultation appointments, training sessions, and so on. I also have a LibGuide page at http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/patents.

Patents and trademarks have applications beyond science and technology; I tend to focus on STEM, but that’s more about me than about the information. I’d love the opportunity to talk to someone working in the graphic design space, studying the history of science, or doing any other kind of research where patents or trademarks may be relevant. If anyone out there is interested, by all means, contact me.


Contact Professor Zwicky at dzwicky@purdue.edu.

Integrative Data Science Initiative at Purdue University Purdue University Libraries faculty are part of two research teams to receive funding in Purdue University’s initial round of research for the Integrated Data Science Initiative (IDSI). According to the IDSI website, the vision for the initiative is “to be at the forefront of advancing data science-enabled research and education by tightly coupling theory, discovery, and applications while providing students with an integrated, data science-fluent campus ecosystem.”

Last March, Purdue University administrators and researchers working on the initiative disseminated an initial request for proposals (RFP) as “the first investment towards achieving the goals of the Integrative Data Science Initiative.” The areas of focus/themes for the RFP included: health care; defense; ethics, society, and policy; fundamentals, methods, and algorithms; and cross-cutting data science-enabled research.

The RFP resulted in 52 separate highly competitive proposals addressing data science applications in the theme areas. Libraries faculty are part of two research teams that received funding, including the following research projects and investigators:

For more information about the initiative, visit www.purdue.edu/data-science/.
Libraries Researchers Awarded Funding for Proposals in Purdue’s Integrative Data Science Initiative Research

Purdue Univeristy student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

by Teresa Koltzenburg, Purdue Libraries

Purdue University senior Jacob Nolley is in no danger of lacking entrepreneurial ideas and endeavor. Nolley—a dual marketing and management major in the Purdue Krannert School of Management and president of the Purdue Honors College Mentor Council—and his business partner and best friend, Collin Clevenger (who attends Ball State University), have both embodied the entrepreneurial spirit since they were in fourth grade together many years ago. Back then, the Shelbyville (IN) natives started a business selling lollipops and pencil erasers to their elementary-school classmates. The pair’s business partnership continued into their high school years, when they founded a headband business together and sold their headband products to fellow students and friends.

The GripIt Mobile Device Holder

The GripIt mobile device holder

Most recently, Nolley and Clevenger started the product-development venture The Graphite Lab, through which they hope to help other young entrepreneurs take their product ideas to market successfully. As a proof of their product-development company concept, Nolley and Clevenger have developed their very own product, the GripIt, a holder for mobile devices, which they describe as “the most comfortable, customizable, and care-free way to hold your device.” Sleeker (for carrying a device in one’s pocket) than the popular pop-up holders—and still creating a more secure grip on one’s valuable mobile device—GripIt attaches easily to mobile devices (including tablets) and features 16 different band colors. Nolley said, too, those who order GripIt in bulk orders (for giveaways and brand awareness “swag”) will have even more customizable options (e.g., printing the bands and/or more color options).

Recently, the pair launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to help them purchase start-up capital, including a printer so they can make some of the product pieces themselves. But before they could start marketing GripIt (and the services of The Graphite Lab) and launch their Indiegogo campaign, Nolley and Clevenger needed a product prototype to show to prospective investors and to take to manufacturing partners. That’s where the 3D printing resources in the Purdue University Libraries’ Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) proved to be integral. (D-VELoP is part of the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.) After creating a design using OnShape online product-design software, Nolley used D-VELoP’s 3D printing resources and the D-VELoP staff members’ expertise to help him hone the prototype.

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries' Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries' Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries’ Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

“Libraries personnel, like [Instructional Developer] Aly Edmondson helped me a great deal,” Nolley explained. “I talked with her and other D-VELoP personnel about what they would recommend for this particular prototype design. Through this process, I learned how to design a product to be manufactured, as there are lot of different things that need to be implemented in this type of design—one that will be 3D printed and injection molded— for it to work. I went through about 25 iterations before I came to the final prototype design, and every time I sent a design to be 3D printed, I got it back promptly, and they gave me great feedback, which was super helpful,” he added.

Nolley—who is also minoring in creative writing and completed Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—not only credits D-VELoP’s resources and personnel for helping him and his partner get to this point with the start-up The Graphite Lab and the GripIt product, but he also noted that many people, resources, and services at Purdue have been invaluable during his college career.

“No one has helped me more at Purdue than Debbi Bearden, my academic advisor in the Krannert Leaders Academy. She has helped provide me with all the many, wonderful opportunities I have benefited from as a Purdue student. Debbi has made my time at Purdue absolutely the most fruitful experience I have had in my life,” he noted.

Nolley also took advantage of Purdue University’s Foundry, which, according to the Purdue Foundry website, “exists to help Purdue students, faculty, and local alumni move ideas to the marketplace more quickly.”

“My freshman year at Purdue, I founded ‘Jacob’s Loom,’ a start-up project that I ended up closing because of financing problems, which is part of the inspiration for using the crowdfunding approach for Collin’s and my current start-up project,” he explained. “The resources at the Purdue Foundry and the staff there—like Tim Peoples, Purdue Foundry managing director, and John Hanak, managing director of Purdue Ventures—were pivotal in providing me with the skills to be successful with The Graphite Lab and GripIt.”

Nolley also credits his former Purdue instructor Beth Carroll (who now works in the retail sector)—who taught courses in Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—for helping him learn and hone his entrepreneurial knowledge and skills.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

“She is one of the most helpful faculty members I have ever worked with,” Nolley said.

Nolley and Clevenger launched their Indiegogo campaign just this week, and they only have short window, about a month, to get to their fundraising goal of $15,000. The good news is that, as of June 1, they already have close to 100 backers and have raised more than $1,000.

“We used Indiegogo because we wanted to show it is possible that you do not have to sell your ideas and efforts to get your company off the ground. That is what we want to do with our customers of The Graphite Lab,” Nolley explained. “So, when people bring their products to us, we want to help them get their ideas off the ground and sell their products through our sales channels, but we do not want to own their products. Many times, what happens with young entrepreneurs, in order to get their ideas to market, they have to ‘sell their souls to the devil,’ so to speak, and sell off their companies and product-development ideas and efforts. So, in the long term, they do not earn those profits. We want to lead by example, and we are trying to show young entrepreneurs that they do not have to sell their companies and/or ideas. We are providing them with another option through The Graphite Lab.”

For more information, check out the GripIt Indiegogo campaign at www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-gripit-iphone-security#/ and/or contact Nolley at JacobNolley@gmail.com or Clevenger at CollinAClevenger@gmail.com.

 

Purdue Libraries: March 2018 Mobile Making Workshops

 

Faculty and staff in the Library of Engineering & Science & D-VELoP (Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue) are hosting two more of the popular Mobile Making workshops in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) in March.

This month, each workshop will feature 3D-printed jewelry- and keychain-making activities.

D-VELoP workshops, which are free and open to all those at Purdue University, are set from 1-4 p.m. Thursday, March 8 and Thursday, March 22, and are located just to the east of the first floor information desk in the WALC.

“We’ll have the 3D printed items already printed, so all you have to do is turn them into earrings or key chains,” noted Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Sarah Huber.

Learn more about D-VELoP at www.lib.purdue.edu/d-velop.

 

The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC)

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” — John F. Kennedy

 

Today and this weekend will be one that is bittersweet for many on the Purdue University campus–and especially so for many in Purdue University Libraries.

Many students are wrapping up their final exams and will soon head home for the summer, leaving their college lives behind for a time. Those who are graduating next week are preparing for commencement and are likely looking toward their new lives in the work world or in advanced degree programs.

And, here in Purdue Libraries, today and tomorrow, we are closing the buildings of six of our libraries–to start the process of the move to the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center (photo above).

The newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, along with the many active learning resources available in the Wilmeth Center, will officially open to the public Monday, August 7.

Information about the individual libraries that are closing, as well as for Purdue Libraries’ users, is just below.


Today (Friday, May 5), the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will close at 5 p.m; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

The libraries that will remain open during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center include:

  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Aviation Technology Library
  • Black Cultural Center
  • Hicks Undergraduate Library
  • Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics
  • Veterinary Medical Library

From May 7-June 11, Purdue Libraries’ users who need materials from the closed libraries can search for and retrieve materials by using the secure Interlibrary (ILL) System or UBorrow. An active Purdue Career ID is required for login. You will be notified when the material you requested is ready for pick up at the ILL Office in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library or is ready for download. For currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars, we deliver the research material you need to your desktop or office quickly and efficiently.

From June 12 through the opening of the WALC (August 7), users will be able to submit requests for the materials located in the closed locations and pick up their materials from an open library of their choosing. After the WALC opens, materials in the closed libraries can still be requested in the Libraries catalog and will be delivered to an open library of their choosing. Office and desktop delivery for currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars will continue.


Here’s to the future, Purdue!

— Teresa Koltzenburg, Director of Strategic Communication

 

The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC)

The Wilmeth Active Learning Center, which will house the Library of Engineering and Science, at Purdue University is on schedule to open Monday, August 7.

Purdue University’s newest building, the Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), is on schedule to open to the public Monday, August 7.

After the end of the spring 2017 semester, the facility will consolidate six of the nine science libraries to form the Library of Engineering and Science in one location at the heart of campus. The WALC houses 27 collaborative active learning classrooms and will be a daily academic destination for approximately 5,000 Purdue students and faculty. (Read more about the background of the facility at www.lib.purdue.edu/walc/.)

After finals week (May 1-5), Libraries faculty and staff in the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Engineering; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will begin the process of moving books and materials from their current locations on the West Lafayette campus to the new WALC or to other locations. The Chemistry; EAPS; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will close at 5 p.m. Friday, May 5; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

Below are some FAQs about the process of the six libraries moving to the new facility.

Q. Will the materials in the EAPs; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries be accessible during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center?

A. From May 7-June 11, Purdue Libraries’ users who need materials from the closed libraries can search for and retrieve materials by using the secure Interlibrary (ILL) System or UBorrow. An active Purdue Career ID is required for login. You will be notified when the material you requested is ready for pick up at the ILL Office in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library or is ready for download. For currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars, we deliver the research material you need to your desktop or office quickly and efficiently.

From June 12 through the opening of the WALC (August 7), users will be able to submit requests for the materials located in the closed locations and pick up their materials from an open library of their choosing. After the WALC opens, materials in the closed libraries can still be requested in the Libraries catalog and will be delivered to an open library of their choosing. Office and desktop delivery for currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars will continue.

For questions, please contact the ILL Office at ill@purdue.edu or via phone at (765) 494-2800.

Q. Which libraries facilities will be open during the move to the WALC?

A. The libraries that will remain open during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center include the:

  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Aviation Technology Library
  • Black Cultural Center
  • Hicks Undergraduate Library
  • Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics
  • Veterinary Medical Library
The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) is a new Libraries building situated centrally on campus and will house the newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, as well as 27 active learning classrooms. The WALC incorporates evidence-based active teaching and learning resources to create a 21st-century learning commons at Purdue University.

Architectural rendering of the Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), a new Libraries building situated centrally on the Purdue University campus. It will house the newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, as well as 27 active learning classrooms. The WALC incorporates evidence-based active teaching and learning resources to create a 21st-century learning commons at Purdue.

Q. What will the new WALC have to offer?

A. The Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center will consolidate six engineering and science libraries. The new facility also blends and integrates centrally scheduled active learning classrooms, library/information services, formal study spaces, collaborative work areas, and informal learning spaces. During the class day, 40 percent of the center will be library/study spaces, which, at the end of the class day, during the evening and throughout the night, expand to nearly the entire building. This flexibility of classroom/study/learning space allows for greater building efficiency. Date visualization and 3D printing resources will also be available once the building has opened for use.

In addition, the Reading Room provides a spectacular view of Purdue’s iconic clock tower, and an Au Bon Pain café and bakery will provide food services on the first floor and will open onto the patio adjacent to the building.

Q. After the Wilmeth Active Learning Center opens in August, how many libraries will be open on the West Lafayette Campus?

A. Below is a list of the libraries on Purdue University’s West Lafayette campus before and after the WALC:

Before WALC After WALC
Archives and Special Collections Archives and Special Collections
Aviation Technology Aviation Technology
Black Cultural Center Black Cultural Center
Chemistry Engineering and Science
Earth, Atmospheric, Planetary Sciences (EAPS) Hicks Undergraduate
Engineering Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE)
Hicks Undergraduate Mathematical Sciences
Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Parrish Management and Economics
Life Sciences  Veterinary Medical Library
Mathematical Sciences
Parrish Management and Economics
Pharmacy, Nursing, Health
Physics
Veterinary Medical Library

 

Q. What are the libraries’ hours for the remainder of the Spring 2017 semester and the Summer 2017 sessions?

A. The hours of each of Purdue University Libraries are listed at www.lib.purdue.edu/hoursList.

After finals week, Libraries faculty and staff in the Chemistry; EAPS; Engineering; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will begin the process of moving books and materials from their current locations on the West Lafayette campus to the new WALC or to other locations. The Chemistry; EAPS; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing and Health Sciences; and Physics Libraries will close at 5 p.m. Friday, May 5; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

Note: After the Fall 2017 semester begins, the WALC will remain open 24 hours per day (with PUID card swipe), and, as of Sunday, Aug. 20, the Hicks Undergraduate Library will no longer be open 24 hours per day.

In addition, the Hicks Undergraduate Library’s basement, which includes two IMPACT classrooms, B848 and B853, will close Saturday, May 6. Hicks Library users will no longer be able to access the basement of Hicks (which is one level below the ground floor, or “underground” library) after that date (May 6) until further notice.

Patent_Poster_v2

A new LibGuide provided by Purdue University Libraries Research Data and developed in collaboration with ITaP displays the variety of data storage options available to researchers at Purdue University. After conversations with new faculty and graduate students where specific information on the data storage options present at Purdue and the considerations that go into selecting an appropriate data storage solution for a given data set were requested, the LibGuide was designed to meet those needs for all researchers.

The primary page lists six of the most common selection criteria for all available storage solutions at Purdue, including price, available storage, primary use, backups, access after leaving Purdue’s campus, and access from and to high performance computing systems. Each storage solution then has a profile page that includes in-depth information on 23 selection criteria, to give researchers a comprehensive picture for each data storage solution.

A link to the LibGuide can be found here: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/DataStorage

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Harvard Library and Purdue University Libraries collaborated in hosting a two-day data management symposium at Harvard on June 16-17. The focus of the symposium centered on new roles for libraries as part of data management strategies during all parts of the research cycle. Attendees came from across the country.

The Symposium incorporated visionary ideas, new concepts and inspirational speakers. The purpose was to promote data awareness and integration of library services into the research cycle, and to demonstrate that data management is not simply about compliance but also about building relationships and engaging stakeholders at all levels.

Well-managed data can allow researchers to develop new lines of inquiry that would not have been possible previously and to communicate their work in innovative ways; librarians can contribute to this effort.

“The agreement by Sarah Thomas, my counterpart at Harvard, to have Harvard Library collaborate with Purdue University Libraries on this symposium recognizes the high regard in which Purdue University Libraries is held for its leadership role in data management. I was very proud of the presentations and participation of my Purdue colleagues at the symposium,” said James L. (Jim) Mullins, dean of libraries and Esther Ellis Norton Professor at Purdue.

The symposium was planned by a joint committee made up of Harvard and Purdue individuals; from Purdue Libraries it included: Paul Bracke, associate dean for research and assessment; Scott Brandt, professor of library science and data specialist; and, Michael Witt, associate professor of library science and head, Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2).

Other faculty from Purdue who presented and participated were: Jeffrey T. Bolin, associate vice president for research centers, cores, and research development services and professor of biological sciences, Department of Biological Science; and Sylvie Brouder, professor of agronomy, College of Agriculture.

On June 18, a workshop was held that brought together groups from only Harvard and Purdue to explore in more detail specific challenges facing data management at the two universities. Purdue Libraries faculty and staff who presented at the workshop included: Amy Barton, assistant professor of library science and metadata specialist; Scott Brandt, professor of library science and data specialist; Marianne Stowell Bracke, associate professor of library science and agricultural sciences information specialist; Paul Bracke, associate dean for research and assessment; Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor of library science and physical and mathematical sciences information specialist; Line Pouchard, assistant professor of library science and data specialist and Michael Witt, associate professor of library science and head, Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2).

Contributors to the workshop from Purdue Libraries included: Carly Dearborn, digital preservation and electronic records archivist; Nicole Kong, assistant professor of library science and GIS specialist; Megan Sapp Nelson, associate professor of library science and data information literacy specialist; and Pete Pascuzzi, assistant professor of library science and molecular biosciences information specialist.

Full details on the symposium can be found at: http://library.harvard.edu/harvard-purdue-data

Contact: Shannon Walker, 765-496-9610, walker81@purdue.edu