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‘PSET’ category

Every year, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies hosts the Purdue GIS (Geographic Information Systems) Day Conference. During it, Purdue students demonstrate how they have applied GIS in their individual areas of study and research. Nicole Kong, PULSIS associate professor and GIS specialist at Purdue, heads up the conference, along with a team of collaborators from across Purdue, all who are involved in GIS work in some way. This year, the Purdue GIS Day Conference is set for Thursday, Nov. 7 in Stewart Center. (More information about research and project submission deadlines is available at lib.purdue.edu/gis/gisday/gisday_2019_college_program.)

Nicole Kong, associate professor and GIS specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Nicole Kong, associate professor and GIS specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

In addition to planning the Purdue GIS Day Conference and her teaching duties, Kong serves as a principal investigator (PI) or co-PI for various GIS and data-science research projects at Purdue. Recently, she was awarded funding in Purdue’s Integrative Data Science Initiative (IDSI) for the project, “Integrating Geospatial Information Across Disciplines.” In addition, she is co-PI for two more GIS-related projects, both which were recently funded through U.S. government agencies. The projects include:

  • 2019 – 2020: “Leveraging Soil Explorer for Soils and Ecological Training.” USDA (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture), NRCS (Natural Resource Conservation Service), Soil Science Collaborative Research Proposals Notice of Funding Opportunity (NFO). PI: D. Schulze (agronomy) and co-PI J. Ackerson (agronomy): $52,295.49.
  • 2018 – 2019: “IndianaView Program Development and Operations for the State of Indiana.” AmericaView program, U.S. Geological Survey. Co-PI, with L. Biehl, (ITaP), J. Shan (civil engineering): $23,000.

Kong’s important work on the two government-funded research projects has implications for soil research, conservation efforts, and the training of soil scientists, as well as remotely sensed data collections that contribute to the AmericaView project. Data from this project can help inform national and international economic, environmental, social, health, and geopolitical decisions.

“The AmericaView Consortium is charged with helping each state overcome these difficulties and helps the university, secondary-education, and public sectors in each state identify, develop, and distribute the kinds of applications each state needs most. In light of our nation’s current focus on achieving a secure and stable digital infrastructure, never has this task been more relevant,” Kong explained.

Below, Kong provides more background about both projects and how the research in both contributes to soil mapping across the globe, as well as the mapping, monitoring, and management of natural and environmental resources.

Q. How did the “Leveraging Soil Explorer for Soils and Ecological Training” project come about and how will you and your team use the grant funds?

Kong: This project was developed based upon the success of our previous award of “Integrating Spatial Education Experience (Isee)” funded by NRCS. In the previous award, we successfully collaborated with several other states to develop soil property maps for education purposes.

In this project, we will further develop the soil maps for the conterminous U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, and U.S. territories, as well as provide training materials about how to use the new maps to improve soil and ecology training. Part of the funds will be used for Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies to assist in creating and sharing the maps, as well as for GIS server improvement.

Q. Who else is involved with “Leveraging Soil Explorer for Soils and Ecological Training” project?
Kong: This project is led by Dr. Darrell Schulze in the agronomy department. Dr. Jason Ackerson and I are co-PIs on the project.

Q. How will the data you gather be used in the future?
Kong: Detailed soil surveys across U.S. have been conducted and well documented by the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO). This database contains very rich information about soil properties, but often requires extensive knowledge in related fields to understand. On the other hand, maps are models of our world that allow us to make sense of a space that is too large and too complex for us to comprehend in any other way. Digital maps are inherently scalable and can show both the details and the overview seamlessly. Soil maps can help researchers to understand how soils and soil properties are distributed across landscapes at various scales. They can be critical resources for training scientists in the disciplines of soil science, ecology, agronomy, geology, and other natural sciences. The results of the maps will be delivered via SoilExplorer webpage, as well as the Soil Explorer apps for iOS and Android devices. Learning materials, workshops and webinars will also be delivered to the trainers.

Q. Any other information important to include about this project?
Kong: Managing, sharing, and leveraging geospatial information generated by Purdue researchers is an essential part of the GIS team’s mission. With the similar research methods, we have also collaborated in soil mapping projects in Kenya and Peru. Using spatial information as a way to teach soil properties has been a success in many classrooms through our studies.

Q. What is the purpose of the “IndianaView Program Development and Operations for the State of Indiana” project and who is involved?
Kong: The purpose of IndianaView is to promote sharing and use of public domain remotely sensed image data for education, research, and outreach across universities, colleges, K-12 educators, and state and local governments in Indiana. It is part of the larger grant, AmericaView, funded by the U.S. Geological Survey. This project is a collaboration among Mr. Larry Biehl (ITaP), Dr. Jie Shan (civil engineering), and me.

Q. What are you hoping to accomplish with the project? How will the data you gather be used in the future?
Kong: Within this project, we will continue to develop the IndianaView Consortium, which currently includes 15 institutions. We will select and support undergraduate and graduate student scholarships, as well as mini-grant opportunities for the consortiums members for research, education, or outreach. In addition, we have also planned activities for K-12 outreach, presenting at local or regional conferences, and teaching in undergraduate and graduate classrooms. (More information is available at www.indianaview.org.)

Q. What is AmericaView and why is it important?
Kong: AmericaView is a nationwide partnership of remote sensing scientists who support the use of Landsat and other public domain remotely sensed data through applied research, K-12, and higher education. The need for AmericaView has been building for more than 30 years. Since the early 1970s, the federal government and private sector have spent billions of dollars on satellite-based earth observing systems and have worked with the research community to identify, develop, and distribute real-world applications for mapping, monitoring, and managing natural and environmental resources. Unfortunately, while the potential uses of the technology have been widely recognized, development and distribution of real-world applications have persistently been tough issues for both the federal government and the academic research community. The AmericaView Consortium is charged with helping each state overcome these difficulties and helps the university, secondary-education, and public sectors in each state identify, develop, and distribute the kinds of applications each state needs most.


More information about GIS resources via the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies is available at www.lib.purdue.edu/gis.

Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Faculty Members - IDSI Funding, Second RoundPurdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Faculty Members - IDSI Funding, Second RoundSeven Purdue University Libraries and School of Information (PULSIS) faculty members are part of three of five research teams to receive funding in Purdue University’s second round of research for the Integrative Data Science Initiative (IDSI).

According to the IDSI website, the vision for the initiative is “to be at the forefront of advancing data science-enabled research and education by tightly coupling theory, discovery, and applications while providing students with an integrated, data science-fluent campus ecosystem.”

The three research projects with PULSIS faculty members are also are led by PULSIS faculty as the principal investigators.

The PULSIS projects and researchers are as follows:

  • IMPACT Data Science Education: Preparing Undergraduates to Lead into the Future, Libraries and School of Information Studies and College of Science
    PI: Clarence Maybee, PULSIS; team members: Guang Lin, mathematics statistics and School of Mechanical Engineering; Wei Zakharov, PULSIS, Chao Cai, PULSIS; and Jason Fitzsimmons, Center for Instructional Excellence.
  • Building a Data Science Education Ecosystem Resource Collection, Libraries and School of Information Studies and College of Science
    PI: Pete Pascuzzi, PULSIS; team members: Gladys Andino, research computing; Mark D. Ward, statistics; and Michael Witt, PULSIS.
  • Integrating Geospatial Information Across Disciplines, Libraries and School of Information Studies
    PI: Nicole Kong, PULSIS; team members: Bryan Pijanowski, forestry and natural resources; Jie Shan, civil engineering; Dharmendra Saraswat, agricultural and biological engineering; Songlin Fei, forestry and natural resources; Brady Hardiman, forestry and natural resources; Ian Lindsay, anthropology; Michael Fosmire, PULSIS; Ephrem Abebe, pharmacy practice; Vetria Byrd, computer graphics technology; Guang Lin, data science consulting service; Preston Smith, IT research computing; and Erica Lott, Center for Instructional Excellence.

For more information, visit www.purdue.edu/data-science/education/education-proposals.php.

The Aviation Technology (AvTech) Library will be closed during the 2019 fall semester for renovations. During this time, the AvTech collection will not be accessible. Other library services will be available as follows:

  • Book returns: A book return drop-box is located in the lobby of the Niswonger Aviation Technology Building.
  • Requests: Even though the Aviation Technology Library collection will not be available during the fall semester, patrons may make requests for books, articles, etc., through Interlibrary Loan (www.lib.purdue.edu/services/interlibrary-loan). When notified, patrons can pick up items at the Library of Engineering and Science information desk (Wilmeth Active Learning Center, second floor).
  • Reserves: Course reserves can be accessed at the Library of Engineering & Science reference desk (WALC, second floor) . Some faculty members have made alternate arrangements for reserves, which they will communicate to their students.

We apologize for this temporary inconvenience and thank you for your understanding and patience while we renovate the AvTech Library. When the library reopens on January 2, 2020, there will be more space available and an improved atmosphere in which to study and utilize library services.

For more information, contact Operations Manager Craig Leavell at cleavell@purdue.edu.

Bethany McGowan, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Bethany McGowan

Recently, two members of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty were selected to receive a Research Data Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). The $20,000 grant award for the project, “Understanding Rates of Attrition in Biomedical Data Challenges: A Study of Failure,” will enable Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor Bethany McGowan and Associate Professor Ilana Stonebraker to provide research data management training to students.

The award will facilitate a variety of training workshops including: FAIR Data Principles; Research Data Management Basics: Finding and Organizing Data; Cleaning and Formatting Data with OpenRefine; General Tips for Visualizing Biomedical Data; Biomedical Data Visualization with Tableau; and Useful R Packages for Analyzing and Visualizing Biomedical Data. The grant period began May 1 and will conclude April 30, 2020.

The workshops are part of a larger research project through which McGowan and Stonebraker will conduct a study to understand rates of attrition in biomedical data challenges.

Ilana Stonebraker, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Ilana Stonebraker

“Our study will examine student motivation for participation in extracurricular innovation challenges, such as hackathons and case competitions, which involve the use of biomedical data, in an attempt to understand failure and reduce rates of attrition in these events,” said McGowan, who is the project lead.

In addition to presenting results of their research at conferences throughout the year, McGowan and Stonebraker will develop a digital open-education resource toolkit to help guide librarians in recruiting for and retaining diverse student populations in data-hacking challenges.

According to the NNLM’s Greater Midwest Region (GMR) website, the project supports Goal 3 of the National Library of Medicine’s Strategic Plan, which is to build a workforce for data-driven research and health.

“It supports the aligning objectives to expand and enhance research training for biomedical informatics and data science, to assure data science and open science proficiency, to increase workforce diversity, and to engage the next generation and promote data literacy,” states the NNLM GMR website.

Dawn or Doom 2018; Purdue Libraries' EventsLearn how to communicate and present your research data for maximum impact through Purdue Libraries-sponsored events at Purdue University’s fifth annual Dawn or Doom Conference.

Join Data Designer Jennifer Lyons (Evergreen Data) for two sessions about effective data presentation Monday, Nov. 5. Details for each event are listed below. Please note that registration is required for the afternoon workshop.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. — “Presenting Data Effectively: Practical Methods for Improving Evaluation Communication” (presentation), Stewart Center 314
  • 3-6 p.m. — “Effective Data Visualization: Communicating Your Findings for Maximum Impact” (workshop), Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), B058

Registration is required for the workshop; register online at go.lib.purdue.edu/events/dawnordoom.

About Dawn or Doom

Celebrating its fifth year, Dawn or Doom explores the effects of rapidly emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence and genetic engineering, by bringing together leading national experts and stars from Purdue’s large constellation of researchers to kick-start conversations about potential risks and rewards. Learn more about the conference at www.purdue.edu/dawnordoom/.

 

 

David Zwicky, Purdue University Libraries

David Zwicky, Purdue University Libraries

Many at Purdue know about (and have likely benefited from using) Purdue University Libraries’ robust research resources (online and in print), as well as cutting-edge services (e.g., 3D printing, data visualization, data management, research and scholarly communication support… the list goes on). What some individuals may not completely understand, though: How Purdue University Libraries faculty members contribute to instruction, teaching, and learning at Purdue.

In addition to serving as instructors and co-instructors in courses across the disciplines and majors here at Purdue, Libraries’ faculty members also perform important liaison duties to help faculty in all disciplines connect their students to important and authoritative information in their respective fields.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll introduce you to the Purdue Libraries faculty liaisons and share a bit about what they each do in their librarian, instructor, liaison, and/or information specialist roles.

This week, we start by introducing David (“Dave”) Zwicky, assistant professor of library science and chemical information specialist at Purdue Libraries. His liaison responsibilities include the departments of chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials engineering. He is also a patent and trademark specialist, affiliated with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent & Trademark Resource Center (PTRC) program.

His work through the PTRC is an invaluable resource here at Purdue, particularly for those who are interested in patents and want to understand how they are and can be used in business and industry.

“Patents help you avoid repeating work other people have done, they can inspire new designs, and expired patents are pieces of technology that are in the public domain, free to be built upon and adapted,” explained Zwicky. They also let you know what technologies other companies are exploring (they’re a key part of competitive intelligence analysis). And, of course, if you can get a patent on your own invention, that’s incredibly powerful when you want to commercialize it,” he added.

Following is a brief overview, through a short Q&A, of how Professor Zwicky advances teaching and learning at Purdue, through his direct work with students and faculty.

Q. Tell me a bit about your background, what you do here as a faculty member in Purdue Libraries, and your role as the patent and trademark specialist in the Libraries.

Professor Zwicky: As the chemical information specialist, I work with folks in my liaison departments to support research, incorporate information literacy into courses, build collections, and just generally see that their information needs are met.

Before I became a librarian, I was actually a chemical engineer (with my B.S. and M.S. in the field), and I was on my way to a Ph.D., but I decided I couldn’t see myself working in the field. I had worked in my undergraduate university’s engineering library and I knew that STEM and library science could be complementary, so I switched over and got an master’s degree in library and information science. It’s been a great experience, and my two different areas of study and former career practice work really well together.

I’m also Purdue University’s representative to the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office’s PTRC (Patent & Trademark Resource Center) program. We’re an outreach organization affiliated with the USPTO, which tries to help people in our communities learn more about patents and trademarks. This usually means teaching students and entrepreneurs about the basics of the patent system and how they can do their own patent searching.

I do this through courses, through workshops, and through one-on-one consultations. Patents are a different beast than other forms of information, harder to search, and harder to use. One of my specialties is breaking them down and showing people how to work with them effectively. I’ve been a patent librarian for about nine years (at my last job and here at Purdue), and I’m currently the president of the PTRC Association (the professional group for PTRC reps).

Q. Why are patents important sources of information for faculty and student researchers?

Professor Zwicky: Patents are important for researchers for a few reasons. The big, obvious reason is that researchers might want to get patents of their own. If they invent something novel and useful, they may want to patent and commercialize it, which is great for both the researcher and for the University. That said, I really want to get people to think how patents can be useful beyond their entrepreneurial applications. Patents have the potential to give researchers insight into research and development that goes on outside of academia. If you’re working in industry and you invent something important, you may not write an academic article or present at a scholarly conference; you’re almost certainly going to apply for a patent. These publicly available documents dramatically expand the scope of the scientific literature, particularly in applied areas.

Q. Through you, how does Purdue Libraries and Purdue U. collaborate with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent and Trademark Research Center?

Professor Zwicky: The PTRC program is aimed at outreach. Personnel at the USPTO realize that entrepreneurs around the country need to know about intellectual property (especially independent inventors), and they know not everyone can come to the main patent office in Alexandria (Virginia). So they’ve set up this program, which links 80-odd libraries (public, government, and academic) from around the country with the USPTO and each other. If someone in our area has a need for a patent or trademark consultation, the USPTO can refer that individual to us for the basic level of training. In exchange, the Purdue Libraries get access to USPTO training and resources.

In practice, this means that I meet with people from Purdue, Lafayette, and West Lafayette, and our general area of Indiana and Illinois (the other PTRCs in our area are Chicago Public Library and Indianapolis Public Library) and talk to them about patents and trademarks. I am not a lawyer and I can’t answer any legal questions, but I can explain the overall process and show them the publicly available tools they can use to do their own searching. I also use what I’ve learned through this program to teach about intellectual property.

Q. What does it mean that you have liaison responsibilities with the Purdue departments of chemistry, chemical engineering and materials engineering?

Professor Zwicky: My liaison responsibilities mean I’m the point of contact for people in those departments (faculty, staff, and students) when they have information needs. Is there a book they think we should add to the Libraries’ collection? Do they need help finding a specific reference or doing a broader literature search? Do they want to incorporate information literacy into their courses? I’m here to help with all of that and more.

Q. How does patent research apply to the work you do with faculty and students teaching and learning in these disciplines/departments?

Professor Zwicky: Patents are particularly relevant in that last area of teaching and learning. Not only do students—especially students who are interested in pursuing careers outside of academia—need to know basic information about patents; patents represent an incredible opportunity for students to engage with information in a different way. Patents, among other applications, can be used as case studies, showing students how other people have tried to solve real-world problems, and they’re incredibly potent in the context of design courses.

Q. Why is it important for faculty and even student researchers to be aware of patents and trademark information? How can they become more knowledgeable about the importance of patents?

Professor Zwicky: Patents help you avoid repeating work other people have done, they can inspire new designs, and expired patents are pieces of technology that are in the public domain, free to be built upon and adapted. They also let you know what technologies other companies are exploring (they’re a key part of competitive intelligence analysis). And, of course, if you can get a patent on your own invention, that’s incredibly powerful when you want to commercialize it.

Trademarks are a little simpler and a little more niche. They’re vitally important in terms of marketing your company and making sure your customers can easily identify your goods and services, but they’re a bit less relevant in purely academic settings.

In terms of learning about patents and trademarks, contact me. I’m happy to set up one-on-one consultation appointments, training sessions, and so on. I also have a LibGuide page at http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/patents.

Patents and trademarks have applications beyond science and technology; I tend to focus on STEM, but that’s more about me than about the information. I’d love the opportunity to talk to someone working in the graphic design space, studying the history of science, or doing any other kind of research where patents or trademarks may be relevant. If anyone out there is interested, by all means, contact me.


Contact Professor Zwicky at dzwicky@purdue.edu.

Integrative Data Science Initiative at Purdue University Purdue University Libraries faculty are part of two research teams to receive funding in Purdue University’s initial round of research for the Integrative Data Science Initiative (IDSI). According to the IDSI website, the vision for the initiative is “to be at the forefront of advancing data science-enabled research and education by tightly coupling theory, discovery, and applications while providing students with an integrated, data science-fluent campus ecosystem.”

Last March, Purdue University administrators and researchers working on the initiative disseminated an initial request for proposals (RFP) as “the first investment towards achieving the goals of the Integrative Data Science Initiative.” The areas of focus/themes for the RFP included: health care; defense; ethics, society, and policy; fundamentals, methods, and algorithms; and cross-cutting data science-enabled research.

The RFP resulted in 52 separate highly competitive proposals addressing data science applications in the theme areas. Libraries faculty are part of two research teams that received funding, including the following research projects and investigators:

For more information about the initiative, visit www.purdue.edu/data-science/.
Libraries Researchers Awarded Funding for Proposals in Purdue’s Integrative Data Science Initiative Research

Purdue Univeristy student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

by Teresa Koltzenburg, Purdue Libraries

Purdue University senior Jacob Nolley is in no danger of lacking entrepreneurial ideas and endeavor. Nolley—a dual marketing and management major in the Purdue Krannert School of Management and president of the Purdue Honors College Mentor Council—and his business partner and best friend, Collin Clevenger (who attends Ball State University), have both embodied the entrepreneurial spirit since they were in fourth grade together many years ago. Back then, the Shelbyville (IN) natives started a business selling lollipops and pencil erasers to their elementary-school classmates. The pair’s business partnership continued into their high school years, when they founded a headband business together and sold their headband products to fellow students and friends.

The GripIt Mobile Device Holder

The GripIt mobile device holder

Most recently, Nolley and Clevenger started the product-development venture The Graphite Lab, through which they hope to help other young entrepreneurs take their product ideas to market successfully. As a proof of their product-development company concept, Nolley and Clevenger have developed their very own product, the GripIt, a holder for mobile devices, which they describe as “the most comfortable, customizable, and care-free way to hold your device.” Sleeker (for carrying a device in one’s pocket) than the popular pop-up holders—and still creating a more secure grip on one’s valuable mobile device—GripIt attaches easily to mobile devices (including tablets) and features 16 different band colors. Nolley said, too, those who order GripIt in bulk orders (for giveaways and brand awareness “swag”) will have even more customizable options (e.g., printing the bands and/or more color options).

Recently, the pair launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to help them purchase start-up capital, including a printer so they can make some of the product pieces themselves. But before they could start marketing GripIt (and the services of The Graphite Lab) and launch their Indiegogo campaign, Nolley and Clevenger needed a product prototype to show to prospective investors and to take to manufacturing partners. That’s where the 3D printing resources in the Purdue University Libraries’ Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) proved to be integral. (D-VELoP is part of the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.) After creating a design using OnShape online product-design software, Nolley used D-VELoP’s 3D printing resources and the D-VELoP staff members’ expertise to help him hone the prototype.

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries' Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries' Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries’ Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

“Libraries personnel, like [Instructional Developer] Aly Edmondson helped me a great deal,” Nolley explained. “I talked with her and other D-VELoP personnel about what they would recommend for this particular prototype design. Through this process, I learned how to design a product to be manufactured, as there are lot of different things that need to be implemented in this type of design—one that will be 3D printed and injection molded— for it to work. I went through about 25 iterations before I came to the final prototype design, and every time I sent a design to be 3D printed, I got it back promptly, and they gave me great feedback, which was super helpful,” he added.

Nolley—who is also minoring in creative writing and completed Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—not only credits D-VELoP’s resources and personnel for helping him and his partner get to this point with the start-up The Graphite Lab and the GripIt product, but he also noted that many people, resources, and services at Purdue have been invaluable during his college career.

“No one has helped me more at Purdue than Debbi Bearden, my academic advisor in the Krannert Leaders Academy. She has helped provide me with all the many, wonderful opportunities I have benefited from as a Purdue student. Debbi has made my time at Purdue absolutely the most fruitful experience I have had in my life,” he noted.

Nolley also took advantage of Purdue University’s Foundry, which, according to the Purdue Foundry website, “exists to help Purdue students, faculty, and local alumni move ideas to the marketplace more quickly.”

“My freshman year at Purdue, I founded ‘Jacob’s Loom,’ a start-up project that I ended up closing because of financing problems, which is part of the inspiration for using the crowdfunding approach for Collin’s and my current start-up project,” he explained. “The resources at the Purdue Foundry and the staff there—like Tim Peoples, Purdue Foundry managing director, and John Hanak, managing director of Purdue Ventures—were pivotal in providing me with the skills to be successful with The Graphite Lab and GripIt.”

Nolley also credits his former Purdue instructor Beth Carroll (who now works in the retail sector)—who taught courses in Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—for helping him learn and hone his entrepreneurial knowledge and skills.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

“She is one of the most helpful faculty members I have ever worked with,” Nolley said.

Nolley and Clevenger launched their Indiegogo campaign just this week, and they only have short window, about a month, to get to their fundraising goal of $15,000. The good news is that, as of June 1, they already have close to 100 backers and have raised more than $1,000.

“We used Indiegogo because we wanted to show it is possible that you do not have to sell your ideas and efforts to get your company off the ground. That is what we want to do with our customers of The Graphite Lab,” Nolley explained. “So, when people bring their products to us, we want to help them get their ideas off the ground and sell their products through our sales channels, but we do not want to own their products. Many times, what happens with young entrepreneurs, in order to get their ideas to market, they have to ‘sell their souls to the devil,’ so to speak, and sell off their companies and product-development ideas and efforts. So, in the long term, they do not earn those profits. We want to lead by example, and we are trying to show young entrepreneurs that they do not have to sell their companies and/or ideas. We are providing them with another option through The Graphite Lab.”

For more information, check out the GripIt Indiegogo campaign at www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-gripit-iphone-security#/ and/or contact Nolley at JacobNolley@gmail.com or Clevenger at CollinAClevenger@gmail.com.

 

Purdue Libraries: March 2018 Mobile Making Workshops

 

Faculty and staff in the Library of Engineering & Science & D-VELoP (Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue) are hosting two more of the popular Mobile Making workshops in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) in March.

This month, each workshop will feature 3D-printed jewelry- and keychain-making activities.

D-VELoP workshops, which are free and open to all those at Purdue University, are set from 1-4 p.m. Thursday, March 8 and Thursday, March 22, and are located just to the east of the first floor information desk in the WALC.

“We’ll have the 3D printed items already printed, so all you have to do is turn them into earrings or key chains,” noted Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Sarah Huber.

Learn more about D-VELoP at www.lib.purdue.edu/d-velop.

 

The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC)

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” — John F. Kennedy

 

Today and this weekend will be one that is bittersweet for many on the Purdue University campus–and especially so for many in Purdue University Libraries.

Many students are wrapping up their final exams and will soon head home for the summer, leaving their college lives behind for a time. Those who are graduating next week are preparing for commencement and are likely looking toward their new lives in the work world or in advanced degree programs.

And, here in Purdue Libraries, today and tomorrow, we are closing the buildings of six of our libraries–to start the process of the move to the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center (photo above).

The newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, along with the many active learning resources available in the Wilmeth Center, will officially open to the public Monday, August 7.

Information about the individual libraries that are closing, as well as for Purdue Libraries’ users, is just below.


Today (Friday, May 5), the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will close at 5 p.m; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

The libraries that will remain open during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center include:

  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Aviation Technology Library
  • Black Cultural Center
  • Hicks Undergraduate Library
  • Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics
  • Veterinary Medical Library

From May 7-June 11, Purdue Libraries’ users who need materials from the closed libraries can search for and retrieve materials by using the secure Interlibrary (ILL) System or UBorrow. An active Purdue Career ID is required for login. You will be notified when the material you requested is ready for pick up at the ILL Office in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library or is ready for download. For currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars, we deliver the research material you need to your desktop or office quickly and efficiently.

From June 12 through the opening of the WALC (August 7), users will be able to submit requests for the materials located in the closed locations and pick up their materials from an open library of their choosing. After the WALC opens, materials in the closed libraries can still be requested in the Libraries catalog and will be delivered to an open library of their choosing. Office and desktop delivery for currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars will continue.


Here’s to the future, Purdue!

— Teresa Koltzenburg, Director of Strategic Communication