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In March, Purdue Libraries will offer a special Tinkering Humanist Workshop series focused on text analysis. Led by Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah and Library Assistant Trevor Burrows, the series will explore how to incorporate such methodologies as sentiment analysis and stylometrics into humanities research using the programming language R. The workshop instructors will also consider some of the practical and theoretical questions particular to these approaches.

The series schedule is listed below. Registration for each workshop is required.

  • Introduction to Text Analysis with R
    1–4 p.m. Tuesday, March 5
    Please note: this session is required to attend the other two sessions.
  • Sentiment Analysis with R
    2–4 p.m., Tuesday, March 19
  • Stylistic Analysis with R
    2–4 p.m., Tuesday, March 26

Register online at https://goo.gl/forms/u6KdezbBE4jgyDpm2. No previous programming experience is necessary, but participants should be comfortable with basic computer operations.

All sessions will be held in D-VELoP (Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue), located in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC 3045).

For more information, contact Assistant Professor Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

Digital Humanities - Purdue University Libraries

Purdue Libraries’ Tinkering Humanist workshops are presented by Matt Hannah, assistant professor of digital humanities in Purdue Libraries and are designed to help instructors and researchers explore and “tinker” with new tools and technologies to use in their scholarship and teaching.

Explore the power of annotation for your research and instruction in a new “Annotating the Humanities” workshop courtesy of the Purdue University Libraries’ Tinkering Humanist Digital Humanities (DH) Workshop Series.

“Annotating the Humanities” is set from 2-4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, room 3045. Registration is required.

According to Matthew Hannah, assistant professor of digital humanities in Purdue Libraries, the session will cover the challenges of building new digital tools with special guest Hongshan Li, graduate student in the Purdue University Department of Mathematics, who will share a new tool he built to annotate documents.

“These tools are perfect complements for courses because they require students to focus on texts and ‘mark up’ their reading. Hongshan will also share an exclusive first look at his annotation tool designed for classroom application,” Hannah explained. “In this session, we will also discuss the unique challenges of building DH tools.”

Register online at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6. For more information, contact Assistant Professor Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

 

 

Dawn or Doom 2018; Purdue Libraries' EventsLearn how to communicate and present your research data for maximum impact through Purdue Libraries-sponsored events at Purdue University’s fifth annual Dawn or Doom Conference.

Join Data Designer Jennifer Lyons (Evergreen Data) for two sessions about effective data presentation Monday, Nov. 5. Details for each event are listed below. Please note that registration is required for the afternoon workshop.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. — “Presenting Data Effectively: Practical Methods for Improving Evaluation Communication” (presentation), Stewart Center 314
  • 3-6 p.m. — “Effective Data Visualization: Communicating Your Findings for Maximum Impact” (workshop), Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), B058

Registration is required for the workshop; register online at go.lib.purdue.edu/events/dawnordoom.

About Dawn or Doom

Celebrating its fifth year, Dawn or Doom explores the effects of rapidly emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence and genetic engineering, by bringing together leading national experts and stars from Purdue’s large constellation of researchers to kick-start conversations about potential risks and rewards. Learn more about the conference at www.purdue.edu/dawnordoom/.

 

 

Open Access Week 2018Purdue University Libraries will kick off International Open Access Week (October 22-28) with a presentation, “Transparency and Openness in Publishing,” at 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 in Armstrong, room 3115.

Led by Scholarly Publishing Specialist Nina Collins and Data Repository Outreach Specialist Sandi Caldrone, the session will cover current issues in scholarly publishing, the benefits offered by transparency and open publishing practices, and open publishing services provided to the Purdue community by Purdue University Libraries.

The session will be offered again at 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 in Stewart Center, room 206.

In addition, Collins will offer two drop-in sessions, “Ask Me About Open Access,” at 9 a.m. Monday, Oct. 22 in the Lambert lobby and again at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23 in the Knoy lobby.

All four sessions are open free to Purdue University faculty and researchers.

For more information about the above-listed sessions, contact Collins at nkcollin@purdue.edu.

About Open Access Week

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its tenth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. Learn more about Open Access Week at www.openaccessweek.org.

Office of Undergraduate Research - Research Roundtable - Purdue UniversityPurdue faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students are invited to participate in the Undergraduate Research Roundtable from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30 in the Purdue Memorial Union ballrooms.

Online registration is available through Monday (Oct. 15) to reserve a booth. Some booths will have poster boards behind them to display current research posters or other information.

For more information, see www.purdue.edu/undergrad-research/faculty/roundtable.php.

This event is co-sponsored by the Office of Undergraduate Research and the Purdue Society of Professional Engineers.

Editor’s Note: Article appeared Oct. 10 in Purdue Today.

Purdue University Office of Undergraduate ResearchThe Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) at Purdue University is now part of the Purdue Libraries, creating a partnership between two vital resource areas for undergraduate students, faculty, and staff at Purdue.

Now located in the Hicks Undergraduate Library, the OUR is easily accessible and continues to serve as a central resource to promote and expand experiential learning for undergraduate students through research experiences, creative endeavors, and scholarship with skilled mentors.

Amy Childress, Ph.D., Director of Purdue University's Office of Undergraduate Research

Amy Childress,Director of Purdue University’s Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR)

“The partnership between OUR and Purdue Libraries creates an ideal foundation for undergraduate research across our University,” said Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Diversity Jay Akridge. “This is the next step in the development and expansion of undergraduate research experiences at Purdue, and it will build on the successful launch of OUR by integrating the resources of Purdue Libraries into OUR programming and support.”

According to OUR Director Amy Childress, OUR connects students with opportunities to learn beyond traditional classroom activities and gain skills applicable to both research and non-research careers. Studies show that undergraduate students who engage in research are twice as likely to graduate, five times more likely to go on to graduate school, and have more successful careers after graduation.

“This increased collaboration with Libraries faculty and staff, who provide students with the research tools necessary for so many disciplines and publish the Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research, complements the work of the OUR to deliver research support to students,” Childress explained. “It will expand upon the biweekly research seminars that have been sponsored by the OUR and Libraries for the past three semesters. The collective activities of the OUR and Libraries faculty strengthen the University’s commitment to providing high-quality experiential learning opportunities for undergraduates and encouraging mentorship from Purdue’s broad range of researchers and scholars.”

JJ Sadler, Associate Director of Purdue University's Office of Undergraduate Research

JJ Sadler, Associate Director of Purdue University’s OUR

Dean of the Purdue Honors College and Interim Dean of Libraries Rhonda Phillips noted that linking OUR, which is a newer unit at Purdue, with Libraries will facilitate enhanced access to information and skills for knowledge building across the spectrum of inquiry.

“The Libraries faculty and staff are experts in information literacy, and this new partnership will benefit both by connecting vital capacities in information literacy and research-skill development with OUR’s programming and service to students, faculty, and staff across campus,” Phillips said.

“The purpose of the OUR is to foster strong faculty-student mentorships, which aids in student retention, helps students to clarify their career goals, reduces the amount of time it takes for them to earn their degrees, enhances their interest in graduate school, and further develops critical-thinking skills necessary for lifelong success,” Childress added.

Angie Welsheimer, Administrative Assistant, Purdue University Office of Undergraduate Research

Angie Welsheimer, Administrative Assistant, Purdue University’s OUR

According to Purdue Libraries Head of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Education, and Business (HSSEB) Division Erla Heyns, the faculty and staff of the Libraries have a long history and a strong commitment to supporting undergraduate inquiry.

“With the merger of OUR and the Libraries, Purdue University will be able to play a vital role in furthering the education of students as researchers. The Hicks Undergraduate Library, where the OUR is now located, has been identified as the focal point for supporting undergraduate research,” Heyns noted. “To support this collaboration between the OUR and Libraries, Associate Professor Clarence Maybee is spearheading a Libraries’ initiative to create space in Hicks for undergraduate researchers to engage in specialized consultations and interactions with Libraries faculty and staff, as well as a place for students and faculty mentors to come together as a community. He will teach a for-credit course devoted to undergraduate research and the consultation space will play a critical role in supporting this initiative.”

More About the Office of Undergraduate Research

The OUR was launched in July 2017 and serves as a central resource for faculty and staff to coordinate and promote undergraduate research experiences (UREs). By providing this programmatic assistance, faculty, and administrators can better focus their time on more effective URE efforts and priorities. This infrastructure includes a portal for researcher and student recruitment through OURConnect, wraparound educational support in the form of online courses for current and prospective undergraduate researchers, promotion of research-based best practices, and development of a campus-wide community of practice for faculty and staff.

The OUR staff oversees multiple initiatives designed to recognize student research and scholarly achievements, including the annual OUR Scholarship, fall and spring undergraduate research conferences held each semester, a summer poster symposium, and research and travel grants.

For more information and to register for the OUR newsletter, visit www.purdue.edu/undergrad-research or contact Childress at childres@purdue.edu.

Data Repository Outreach Specialist Sandi Caldrone (Research Data, Purdue Libraries)

Data Repository Outreach Specialist Sandi Caldrone (Research Data, Purdue Libraries)

Last week, the Washington Post published an article about the data a Purdue University professor (and two of his research colleagues) gathered on “every confirmed, line-of-duty police killing a civilian in 2014 and 2015.Logan Strother, assistant professor in the Purdue Department of Political Science, used the Purdue University Research Repository, or PURR, to publish the dataset of police shootings he references in the piece. (Co-authors include Charles Menifield and Geiguen Shin, both at Rutgers University, Newark.) According to Data Repository Outreach Specialist (Research Data, Purdue University Libraries) Sandi Caldrone, by using PURR to publish the dataset, Strother is promoting transparency in scholarship.

“It also allows others researchers to replicate or build upon his work,” she noted.

She said the dataset referenced in the Washington Post piece is freely available for public download on the PURR website at doi.org/10.4231/R70G3HCR. It is an example of how one Purdue faculty member uses the valuable PURR research data-management tool.

“PURR is available to anyone at Purdue—faculty, staff, and students,” Caldrone said. “We support researchers throughout the research data-management lifecycle, providing help with data-management planning, online file storage for ongoing projects, data-publication services, and data preservation and archiving.”

According to Vikki Weake, assistant professor in biochemistry at Purdue, she and her lab team members have used PURR extensively to archive datasets associated with their published studies.

“Data management and archiving are becoming increasingly important in the life sciences,” Weake noted. “This is really important, as other researchers have access to the raw data, so they can replicate our analyses and results. The National Institutes of Health have recognized that we need efforts to improve rigor and reproducibility in biomedical science, and services that make raw data freely available are a great way for labs to be transparent about the work that they are doing. Ideally, other groups should be able to take our data and replicate our findings, or if new knowledge becomes available—they might use our data to gain novel insight into a biological process.”

In a brief Q&A below, Caldrone shares how PURR fits into the work that researchers at Purdue University perform and how she and Libraries’ faculty and staff can support them via PURR.

Q. How does PURR fit into the resources and services provided to campus by the Purdue Libraries?

Caldrone: Most of our resources are available online at purr.purdue.edu, but what really sets us apart from other data-management tools is that we have a team on campus to help every step of the way. We’re part of the Research Data unit, which provides consultations and support to help Purdue researchers plan, describe, disseminate, steward, and archive datasets.

Q. Why would faculty and students want to use PURR for their research needs?

Caldrone: Data is a valuable research product, and increasingly funders and publishers expect that product to be shared with the public. We provide the support to meet those funder and publisher requirements. There are lots of other places to publish data online. Our advantage is that we have support staff on campus to help with the process.

Since we are part of the Libraries, we also take preservation seriously, and we carefully archive all of our published datasets. During data collection, many researchers also take advantage of our online file storage space. It’s accessible anywhere on the web and is a simple, easy option for sharing files with off-campus collaborators.

Students learning about data should also look to PURR for sample datasets. See what data looks like in your discipline, download data files, and use them to test data analysis and visualization tools. Or, just explore our collections.

Q. Recently, PURR was redesigned. Why it was needed? What changed about it?

Caldrone: Our look hadn’t changed much since we started in 2011, so we were definitely due for a visual redesign. We took that opportunity to make functional improvements, as well. We increased our storage space, streamlined the registration process, and really expanded our collection of help resources.

Home page of the Purdue University Research Repository. Images that appear on the home page are part of datasets stored in PURR. This image is from "Biological, chemical and flow characteristics of five river sampling sites in the Wabash River watershed near Lafayette, Indiana – 2014."

Home page of the Purdue University Research Repository. Images that appear on the home page are part of datasets stored in PURR. This image is from “Biological, chemical and flow characteristics of five river sampling sites in the Wabash River watershed near Lafayette, Indiana – 2014.”

Q. When in the research process should a researcher at Purdue begin to think about using PURR?

Caldrone: We’re happy to help researchers at any stage, but ideally we hope people will think about PURR early in the planning process. We provide helpful resources and in-person guidance for researchers writing data-management plans, whether or not they decide to publish their data in PURR. Having sound data-management practices in place before data collection starts saves a lot of work and stress down the road.

Q. How should a researcher reach out to you and your team members about using PURR? What kind of customer service help can you provide them to help get them started?

Caldrone: We have written instructions and video demos online showing how to use the PURR (see purr.purdue.edu/guides). We also provide one-on-one or group training sessions and consultations. Researchers can reach out to us at purr@purdue.edu or submit a support ticket on the website. You can also reach the entire Libraries Research Data team at researchdata@purdue.edu.

Q. Any other information you would like to impart to the audience at Purdue?

Caldrone: We’ve had some exciting data collections published recently. Standa Pejsa, PURR’s data curator, worked closely with Professor Nicholas Rauh in classics to publish an image database of hundreds of pottery sherds from Dr. Rauh’s archaeological work in the Cilicia region in what is now Turkey. Their publication is the result of years of hard work and can be found at https://purr.purdue.edu/publications/2924/1.

We’re also working with the philosophy department to publish audio recordings and transcripts of lectures given by French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. This work is still underway, but we have several semesters’ worth of lectures already published. Anyone who would like to hear what it was like to take a course with Deleuze can check out The Movement-Image: Bergsonian Lessons on Cinema.

Purdue Libraries' Graduate Research Information ProgramThe Graduate Research Information Program, or G.R.I.P., workshop series schedule is set for the 2018-19 academic year. The series is designed to enhance graduate students’ research skills. Each workshop session is led by a Purdue Libraries faculty member.

The series is sponsored by the Libraries and The Graduate School. All G.R.I.P. workshops are open free to graduate students at Purdue University.

The 2018-19 schedule is listed below; registration will be available soon via a link on the G.R.I.P. library guide (LibGuide) at guides.lib.purdue.edu/grip.

  • Introduction to Citation Management | 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), room 3045
    What is a citation manager? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero? What about the others? If you have ever wondered about any of these questions, this is the session for you. We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • Do You Get Data? Understanding Data Visualization | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, WALC, room 3049
    As data visualizations become more popular, are you prepared to think critically about the stories and messages conveyed in visualizations? Can you accurately tell the story the data wants to tell in your own visualizations? In this session, we will introduce you to a framework for critically engaging with everyday data. Facilitator: Sarah Huber
  • Endnote Basic for Education Students | 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, HSSE (Humanities, Social Science, and Education) Library CSC (Customer Service Center), room 142
    EndNote Basic citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations. Users will be able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliogra-phies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions. In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, “Cite While You Write” feature, and sharing with a group. If possible, please bring your laptop. Only for education students. Facilitator: Judy Nixon
  • Zotero | 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, WALC, room 3045
    Zotero is a free citation management program that can help you collect, organize, and share your research. This session is designed to help graduate students get started with Zotero. Attendees will learn how to set up Zotero, gather citations, and generate bibliographies. Facilitator: David Zwicky
  • Endnote Desktop | 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, WALC, room 3045
    EndNote Desktop citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations. With EndNote, users are able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliographies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions. In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, “Cite While You Write” feature, and sharing with a group. If possible, please bring your laptop. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • BibTex | 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 19, WALC, room 3045
    Are you a LaTeX user confused by citation management? BibTex is reference management software that allows you to easily cite papers, create formatted bibliographies in your LaTeX documents, and connect to citation managers like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero. This workshop will be an introduction to BibTeX, using the Overleaf platform licensed by Purdue. Facilitator: David Zwicky
  • Introduction to PURR | 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, WALC, room 3045
    One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to a thesis or dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google), and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice. Facilitator: Sandi Caldrone
  • Introduction to Systematic Reviews 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, WALC, room 3045
    Systematic reviews are becoming more prevalent, and increasingly, students are becoming part of the review teams, but there can be confusion around what constitutes a systematic review. Participants in this class will learn about the different review types, including systematic, scoping, and narrative. Participants will also develop an understanding for choosing the appropriate review, based on the research question and the resources available, including time and size of the research team. Common standards for structuring the review, encompassing a variety of topic areas, will be provided. This workshop is ideal for first-time members or PIs on a systematic or scoping review. Facilitator: Jason Reed
  • Voyant Tools for Systematic Reviews | 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, WALC, room 3045
    Using a Text Analysis Tool to Develop Your Search Strategy Text analysis tools are helpful in the development of search strategies for systematic reviews. In this workshop, we’ll conduct a literature search. Then, we’ll use Voyant Tools to generate a set of search terms and apply text analysis procedures to develop, test, and validate a search strategy. Facilitator: Bethany McGowan
  • Conducting a Literature Review | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13,  WALC, room 3045
    A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find. Facilitators: Clarence Maybee and Heather Howard (tentative)
  • Open Refine | 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, WALC, room 3045
    Do you use research strategies like text mining, social networking analysis, or data cleaning in your research? In this series of workshops, we’ll demonstrate research tools and provide datasets for hands-on exploration. You’ll walk away with exposure to tools and techniques that support your research and a better idea of the support systems available through Purdue University Libraries. In this workshop you’ll use OpenRefine to import data in various formats, easily explore large datasets, and clean and transform data with basic and advanced cell transformations. Facilitator: Bethany McGowan (tentative)
  • Introduction to PURR | 2 p.m. Tuesday, January 15, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    Data sharing and publication: One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to a thesis or dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google), and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice. Facilitator: Sandi Caldrone
  • Introduction to Citation Management | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    What is a citation manager? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero? What about the others? If you have ever wondered about any of the questions, this is the session for you. We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • Conducting a Literature Review | 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find. Facilitators: Clarence Maybee and Heather Howard (tentative)

Integrative Data Science Initiative at Purdue University Purdue University Libraries faculty are part of two research teams to receive funding in Purdue University’s initial round of research for the Integrated Data Science Initiative (IDSI). According to the IDSI website, the vision for the initiative is “to be at the forefront of advancing data science-enabled research and education by tightly coupling theory, discovery, and applications while providing students with an integrated, data science-fluent campus ecosystem.”

Last March, Purdue University administrators and researchers working on the initiative disseminated an initial request for proposals (RFP) as “the first investment towards achieving the goals of the Integrative Data Science Initiative.” The areas of focus/themes for the RFP included: health care; defense; ethics, society, and policy; fundamentals, methods, and algorithms; and cross-cutting data science-enabled research.

The RFP resulted in 52 separate highly competitive proposals addressing data science applications in the theme areas. Libraries faculty are part of two research teams that received funding, including the following research projects and investigators:

For more information about the initiative, visit www.purdue.edu/data-science/.
Libraries Researchers Awarded Funding for Proposals in Purdue’s Integrative Data Science Initiative Research

Purdue Libraries Professor Jean-Pierre Hérubel

Purdue Libraries Professor Jean-Pierre Hérubel

In May and early June, members of Purdue University Libraries faculty were recognized by internal and external units and organizations for their contributions to research and scholarship, instruction and teaching, and service and engagement. Below is a list of the recognized faculty members and information about their recent honors and awards.

Jean-Pierre Hérubel, professor of library science, was honored with the 2018 ILA/ACRL (Iowa Library Association/Association of College and Research Libraries) Research Award for the article, “Two Sides of the Same Coin? Trade and University Press Publishing of Revised Dissertations, 2007-2016, Some Observations.” The article was co-authored by Edward A. Goedeken, professor of library science, Iowa State University Library.

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor Heather Howard

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Heather Howard

Heather Howard, assistant professor and business information specialist, was selected to receive Purdue University’s Teaching for Tomorrow Fellowship Award and will serve as junior fellow for the 2018-19 academic year.

 

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and GIS Information Specialist Nicole Kong

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and GIS Information Specialist Nicole Kong

Nicole Kong, assistant professor and geographic information systems (GIS) specialist, was recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) Library Instruction Roundtable as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. Kong’s and her co-authors’ article, “Spatial Information Literacy for Digital Humanities: The Case Study of Leveraging Geospatial Information for African-American History Education,” appeared in College & Undergraduate Libraries (vol. 24, 2017).

 

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Ilana Stonebraker

Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor and Business Information Specialist Ilana Stonebraker

Ilana Stonebraker, assistant professor and business information specialist, was recognized by the ALA Library Instruction Roundtable as an author of one of the Top Twenty Library Instruction Articles of 2017. Stonebraker’s and her co-authors’ article, “Realizing Critical Business Information Literacy: Opportunities, Definitions, and Best Practices” appeared in the Journal of Business & Finance Librarianship (vol. 22, 2017).

Stonebraker has also been inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy for 2018 in recognition of her outstanding and scholarly teaching in graduate, undergraduate, or engagement programs. She is the first member of Purdue Libraries faculty to be inducted into the Purdue University Teaching Academy.