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Nina Collins -Purdue Univeristy Libraries

Nina Collins, Purdue University Libraries

The scholarly publishing landscape has changed more in the last 20 years than the last 300 years. Every year, we see the rise of new technologies and innovations in scholarly publishing, and in many ways, the rapid change has made it difficult for the remainder of the scholarly community to keep pace. Unfortunately, not all emerging trends in scholarly publishing are changes for the better. In recent years, predatory publishing has been on the rise.

Fortunately, for Purdue University researchers, Purdue University Libraries offers in-house expertise and can help faculty and other researchers navigate the issue of predatory publishing, as well as help reap the benefits of Open Access publishing.

Scholarly Publishing Specialist Nina Collins, who is situated in the Purdue University Press, has put together the “Deceptive Publishing” resource via this LibGuide. “Deceptive Publishers: Predatory Publishing.”

Additionally, in the brief Q&A below, she provides an overview of predatory publishing, its impact on Open Access publishing, and how she aids Purdue faculty and researchers in their scholarly publishing pursuits.

Q. What exactly is predatory publishing? Why is this topic and practice important for faculty to be aware of?

Collins: Currently, the phrase “predatory publisher” is an umbrella phrase to describe a wide variety of issues in scholarly publishing, including failure to adhere to publishing best practices, deception, inadequate or non-existent peer review, fraud, and even scientific misconduct. Predatory publishers cause harm to all stakeholders in the scholarly communication ecosystem. Often, these publishers look legitimate on the surface, and scholars in all disciplines can have a difficult time discerning a predatory publisher at first. Frequently, predatory publishers send relentless spam email to scholars, requesting submissions to their journals or participation in their conferences.

Publishing in a questionable journal can have a negative effect on a researcher’s reputation or even inhibit career advancement. Furthermore, as good scholarship can be published in bad outlets, scholars, as consumers of knowledge, can find themselves questioning scholarship based solely on the publication outlet in which it was published. This erodes trust in the scholarly record, in scholarship, and even in scientific knowledge.

Due to the negative association of Open Access, the movement has been especially challenged with the presence of many predatory publishers. Although predatory publishers use traditional publishing business models, as well as Open Access business models, the literature oftentimes associates “open” with “predatory.”

Open Access is a noble goal, supporting many benefits for scholars, students, researchers, practitioners, academic institutions, funding agencies, and the public. There are many paths to Open Access, including the gold standard “author-pays” model, which is the OA business model most often exploited by predatory publishers.

As funding agencies move toward greater transparency and openness, the need for greater awareness of predatory publishers is critical in order to protect scholars, funders, and academic institutions from these deceptions.

Q. What predatory publishing resources do you provide for Purdue faculty?

Collins: Purdue University Libraries offer resources to help faculty identify predatory publishers.

Our “Deceptive Publishers” LibGuide includes tools for faculty and researchers to help identify the most common deceptive and non-transparent practices of predatory publishers.

The University Copyright Office (housed within the Libraries) advises Purdue University faculty and staff about copyright law, as it applies to higher education, and provides information on current issues in copyright. The Copyright Office can provide programs and lectures on issues related to copyright.

Purdue University Press, a division of Purdue University Libraries, aligns the strengths of both publishers and librarians to advance the creation, communication, and discovery of new knowledge. We are Purdue University’s own scholarly publishing experts. Located in Stewart Center, we are available for publishing consultations on any topic related to scholarly publishing.

Within the Press, I serve as the scholarly publishing specialist. I have been researching and talking to scholars about predatory publishers since 2013, and I offer predatory publisher workshops and presentations to departments, schools, and colleges throughout campus. I can be contacted at nkcollin@purdue.edu.

In addition, our librarians work with publishers to provide access to scholarly literature. Collection development and collection assessment are some of our core duties; we are constantly evaluating sources and teaching information literacy, the skills used to evaluate resources. For more information, contact a Subject Librarian.

Q. How else do you help Purdue faculty in their Open Access publishing pursuits?

Collins: Open Access is a legitimate business model in scholarly publishing. It differs from traditional business models in that anyone, anywhere, can access scholarship as soon as it is published.

There are many ways to support Open Access, including publishing in Open Access journals or using the “green” Open Access model, which is a process of self-archiving in an institutional repository. In this model, authors publish their scholarship in traditional publishing outlets, then archive a version of the paper on their institutional repository. Many scholarly publishers have friendly sharing policies, permitting this type of sharing.

Purdue e-Pubs, Purdue University’s institutional repository, provides free, global access to more than 50,000 scholarly resources created by the Purdue University community. We provide a free sharing policy review service, alerting authors which version of their papers can be archived on Purdue e-Pubs. We also offer a free mediated upload service—uploading the paper on the author’s behalf. To participate, email a list of your Purdue publications to epubs@purdue.edu.

Through memberships provided by Purdue University Libraries, Purdue-affiliated authors are entitled to discounts from some gold model Open Access publishers. We are members of SPARC and the Open Textbook Network. Purdue University Press publishes several Open Access journals, and we generously support Open Access publishing in many ways. As scholarly publishing specialist, my expertise is Open Access. Send Open Access questions and inquiries to nkcollin@purdue.edu.

Purdue Libraries' Graduate Research Information ProgramThe Graduate Research Information Program, or G.R.I.P., workshop series schedule is set for the 2018-19 academic year. The series is designed to enhance graduate students’ research skills. Each workshop session is led by a Purdue Libraries faculty member.

The series is sponsored by the Libraries and The Graduate School. All G.R.I.P. workshops are open free to graduate students at Purdue University.

The 2018-19 schedule is listed below; registration will be available soon via a link on the G.R.I.P. library guide (LibGuide) at guides.lib.purdue.edu/grip.

  • Introduction to Citation Management | 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), room 3045
    What is a citation manager? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero? What about the others? If you have ever wondered about any of these questions, this is the session for you. We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • Do You Get Data? Understanding Data Visualization | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, WALC, room 3049
    As data visualizations become more popular, are you prepared to think critically about the stories and messages conveyed in visualizations? Can you accurately tell the story the data wants to tell in your own visualizations? In this session, we will introduce you to a framework for critically engaging with everyday data. Facilitator: Sarah Huber
  • Endnote Basic for Education Students | 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, HSSE (Humanities, Social Science, and Education) Library CSC (Customer Service Center), room 142
    EndNote Basic citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations. Users will be able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliogra-phies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions. In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, “Cite While You Write” feature, and sharing with a group. If possible, please bring your laptop. Only for education students. Facilitator: Judy Nixon
  • Zotero | 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, WALC, room 3045
    Zotero is a free citation management program that can help you collect, organize, and share your research. This session is designed to help graduate students get started with Zotero. Attendees will learn how to set up Zotero, gather citations, and generate bibliographies. Facilitator: David Zwicky
  • Endnote Desktop | 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, WALC, room 3045
    EndNote Desktop citation management software is a clever tool to store, organize, and manipulate your citations. With EndNote, users are able to build a personal library of citations that can be used to create in-text citations and bibliographies for documents, proposals, dissertations, and journal submissions. In this session, we will discuss importing citations, exporting citations, “Cite While You Write” feature, and sharing with a group. If possible, please bring your laptop. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • BibTex | 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 19, WALC, room 3045
    Are you a LaTeX user confused by citation management? BibTex is reference management software that allows you to easily cite papers, create formatted bibliographies in your LaTeX documents, and connect to citation managers like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero. This workshop will be an introduction to BibTeX, using the Overleaf platform licensed by Purdue. Facilitator: David Zwicky
  • Introduction to PURR | 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25, WALC, room 3045
    One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to a thesis or dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google), and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice. Facilitator: Sandi Caldrone
  • Introduction to Systematic Reviews 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, WALC, room 3045
    Systematic reviews are becoming more prevalent, and increasingly, students are becoming part of the review teams, but there can be confusion around what constitutes a systematic review. Participants in this class will learn about the different review types, including systematic, scoping, and narrative. Participants will also develop an understanding for choosing the appropriate review, based on the research question and the resources available, including time and size of the research team. Common standards for structuring the review, encompassing a variety of topic areas, will be provided. This workshop is ideal for first-time members or PIs on a systematic or scoping review. Facilitator: Jason Reed
  • Voyant Tools for Systematic Reviews | 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, WALC, room 3045
    Using a Text Analysis Tool to Develop Your Search Strategy Text analysis tools are helpful in the development of search strategies for systematic reviews. In this workshop, we’ll conduct a literature search. Then, we’ll use Voyant Tools to generate a set of search terms and apply text analysis procedures to develop, test, and validate a search strategy. Facilitator: Bethany McGowan
  • Conducting a Literature Review | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13,  WALC, room 3045
    A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find. Facilitators: Clarence Maybee and Heather Howard (tentative)
  • Open Refine | 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 15, WALC, room 3045
    Do you use research strategies like text mining, social networking analysis, or data cleaning in your research? In this series of workshops, we’ll demonstrate research tools and provide datasets for hands-on exploration. You’ll walk away with exposure to tools and techniques that support your research and a better idea of the support systems available through Purdue University Libraries. In this workshop you’ll use OpenRefine to import data in various formats, easily explore large datasets, and clean and transform data with basic and advanced cell transformations. Facilitator: Bethany McGowan (tentative)
  • Introduction to PURR | 2 p.m. Tuesday, January 15, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    Data sharing and publication: One way to extend your research reputation and get credit for work is to publish data in PURR, the Purdue University Research Repository. PURR allows you to set up a private account where you can store and selectively share data with colleagues. It also allows you to publish data sets to get a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and citation for the data. This will allow you to link data to a thesis or dissertation, facilitate others finding your data (e.g. via Google), and provide reports on how often data has been downloaded. Bring a laptop to start an account and get hands-on experience and advice. Facilitator: Sandi Caldrone
  • Introduction to Citation Management | 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    What is a citation manager? What is the difference between EndNote and Zotero? What about the others? If you have ever wondered about any of the questions, this is the session for you. We will discuss the benefits and challenges with using a citation manager and discuss how to choose which one will work best for you. Facilitator: Nastasha Johnson
  • Conducting a Literature Review | 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, 2019, WALC, room 3045
    A literature review requires the writer to extensively gather and analyze scholarship related to their topic, to explain how their work fits into the larger conversation, and to justify their own research project. This session will help you find the most relevant and useful sources to review the literature related to your research question and to keep track of what you find. Facilitators: Clarence Maybee and Heather Howard (tentative)
Purdue Univeristy student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and Ball State University student Collin Clevenger, co-presidents of The Graphite Lab and developers of the GripIt mobile device holder.

by Teresa Koltzenburg, Purdue Libraries

Purdue University senior Jacob Nolley is in no danger of lacking entrepreneurial ideas and endeavor. Nolley—a dual marketing and management major in the Purdue Krannert School of Management and president of the Purdue Honors College Mentor Council—and his business partner and best friend, Collin Clevenger (who attends Ball State University), have both embodied the entrepreneurial spirit since they were in fourth grade together many years ago. Back then, the Shelbyville (IN) natives started a business selling lollipops and pencil erasers to their elementary-school classmates. The pair’s business partnership continued into their high school years, when they founded a headband business together and sold their headband products to fellow students and friends.

The GripIt Mobile Device Holder

The GripIt mobile device holder

Most recently, Nolley and Clevenger started the product-development venture The Graphite Lab, through which they hope to help other young entrepreneurs take their product ideas to market successfully. As a proof of their product-development company concept, Nolley and Clevenger have developed their very own product, the GripIt, a holder for mobile devices, which they describe as “the most comfortable, customizable, and care-free way to hold your device.” Sleeker (for carrying a device in one’s pocket) than the popular pop-up holders—and still creating a more secure grip on one’s valuable mobile device—GripIt attaches easily to mobile devices (including tablets) and features 16 different band colors. Nolley said, too, those who order GripIt in bulk orders (for giveaways and brand awareness “swag”) will have even more customizable options (e.g., printing the bands and/or more color options).

Recently, the pair launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to help them purchase start-up capital, including a printer so they can make some of the product pieces themselves. But before they could start marketing GripIt (and the services of The Graphite Lab) and launch their Indiegogo campaign, Nolley and Clevenger needed a product prototype to show to prospective investors and to take to manufacturing partners. That’s where the 3D printing resources in the Purdue University Libraries’ Data-Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) proved to be integral. (D-VELoP is part of the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.) After creating a design using OnShape online product-design software, Nolley used D-VELoP’s 3D printing resources and the D-VELoP staff members’ expertise to help him hone the prototype.

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries' Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries' Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

(Top photo) Purdue Libraries Instructional Developer Aly Edmondson wearing a prototype pair of 3D-printed earrings she and her fellow Library of Engineering and Science (LoES) personnel (faculty and staff) produced. To demonstrate the resources in the Libraries’ Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP), Edmondson and LoES personnel offer a number of Mobile Making activities and events throughout the regular academic year at Purdue University. (Bottom photo) D-VELoP offers a number of data-visualization tools, including 3D printing, for research and development. Paired with the expertise of the LoES faculty and staff, D-VELoP offers many learning and research resources, tools, and services within the Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC).

“Libraries personnel, like [Instructional Developer] Aly Edmondson helped me a great deal,” Nolley explained. “I talked with her and other D-VELoP personnel about what they would recommend for this particular prototype design. Through this process, I learned how to design a product to be manufactured, as there are lot of different things that need to be implemented in this type of design—one that will be 3D printed and injection molded— for it to work. I went through about 25 iterations before I came to the final prototype design, and every time I sent a design to be 3D printed, I got it back promptly, and they gave me great feedback, which was super helpful,” he added.

Nolley—who is also minoring in creative writing and completed Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—not only credits D-VELoP’s resources and personnel for helping him and his partner get to this point with the start-up The Graphite Lab and the GripIt product, but he also noted that many people, resources, and services at Purdue have been invaluable during his college career.

“No one has helped me more at Purdue than Debbi Bearden, my academic advisor in the Krannert Leaders Academy. She has helped provide me with all the many, wonderful opportunities I have benefited from as a Purdue student. Debbi has made my time at Purdue absolutely the most fruitful experience I have had in my life,” he noted.

Nolley also took advantage of Purdue University’s Foundry, which, according to the Purdue Foundry website, “exists to help Purdue students, faculty, and local alumni move ideas to the marketplace more quickly.”

“My freshman year at Purdue, I founded ‘Jacob’s Loom,’ a start-up project that I ended up closing because of financing problems, which is part of the inspiration for using the crowdfunding approach for Collin’s and my current start-up project,” he explained. “The resources at the Purdue Foundry and the staff there—like Tim Peoples, Purdue Foundry managing director, and John Hanak, managing director of Purdue Ventures—were pivotal in providing me with the skills to be successful with The Graphite Lab and GripIt.”

Nolley also credits his former Purdue instructor Beth Carroll (who now works in the retail sector)—who taught courses in Purdue University’s Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program—for helping him learn and hone his entrepreneurial knowledge and skills.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

Purdue University student Jacob Nolley and friends demonstrate how the GripIt product works to take a selfie.

“She is one of the most helpful faculty members I have ever worked with,” Nolley said.

Nolley and Clevenger launched their Indiegogo campaign just this week, and they only have short window, about a month, to get to their fundraising goal of $15,000. The good news is that, as of June 1, they already have close to 100 backers and have raised more than $1,000.

“We used Indiegogo because we wanted to show it is possible that you do not have to sell your ideas and efforts to get your company off the ground. That is what we want to do with our customers of The Graphite Lab,” Nolley explained. “So, when people bring their products to us, we want to help them get their ideas off the ground and sell their products through our sales channels, but we do not want to own their products. Many times, what happens with young entrepreneurs, in order to get their ideas to market, they have to ‘sell their souls to the devil,’ so to speak, and sell off their companies and product-development ideas and efforts. So, in the long term, they do not earn those profits. We want to lead by example, and we are trying to show young entrepreneurs that they do not have to sell their companies and/or ideas. We are providing them with another option through The Graphite Lab.”

For more information, check out the GripIt Indiegogo campaign at www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-gripit-iphone-security#/ and/or contact Nolley at JacobNolley@gmail.com or Clevenger at CollinAClevenger@gmail.com.

 

Get A G.R.I.P. (Graduate.Research.Information.Portal): An information portal for graduate students about the services and resources available at Purdue University Libraries. GRIP and Research Data Services has partnered with the Graduate School to offer data services related sessions for graduate students.  These are denoted below by “GSDS” before the session title.  For more information on G.R.I.P. go to: http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/grip.

 

Upcoming G.R.I.P. Workshops:

 

EndNote Desktop

Feb. 11, 2016

10 – 11 am

Purdue Graduate Student Center 105b

Presenter:  Nastasha Johnson

 

EndNote Desktop

Feb. 11, 2016

3-4 pm

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenter:  Nastasha Johnson

 

GSDS: Data Management Planning and Funder Requirements

March 01, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 AM

Purdue Graduate Student Center

Presenter: Dr. Line Pouchard

 

Zotero

March 2, 2016

3-4 pm

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenters:  Dave Zwicky & Catherine Fraser Riehle

 

GSDS: Managing Professional Identity

March 08, 2016

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

Purdue Graduate Student Center

Presenter: Associate Professor Megan Sapp Nelson

 

Excel for Data Management

March 31, 2016

10-11 am

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenter:  Pete Pascuzzi

 

GSDS: Publishing with PURR     

April 12, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

HSSE 142/145

Presenter: Professor D. Scott Brandt /Associate Professor Michael Witt

 

EndNote Basic

April 13, 2016

10-11 am

PGCS 105b

Presenter:  Dave Zwicky

 

EndNote Basic

April 13, 2016

3-4 pm

CSC (HSSE 142)

Presenter:  Amy Van Epps

 

GSDS: Data Management and Sharing Human Subject/ Participant Research

April 19, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

Purdue Graduate Student Center

Presenter: Dr. Kendall Roark

 

GSDS: Excel Workshop 

April 20, 2016

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

Learning Lab: KRAN 250/ Corporate Study Rm KRAN 258/260

Presenter: Dr. Pete Pascuzzi

 

JSTOR Global Plants Title

 

 

 

 

NEW PURDUE LIBRARIES RESOURCE: JSTOR Global Plants

URL: http://purl.lib.purdue.edu/db/jstorplants

DESCRIPTION: Global Plants is the world’s largest database of digitized plant specimens and a locus for international scientific research and collaboration.

Independent Voices Title

 

 

 

NEW PURDUE LIBRARIES RESOURCE: Independent Voices

URL: http://purl.lib.purdue.edu/db/indvoices

DESCRIPTION: Independent Voices chronicles the transformative decades of the 60s, 70s and 80s through the lens of an independent alternative press. Independent Voices provides easy access to the powerful voices of feminists, dissident GIs, campus radicals, Native Americans, anti-war activists, Black Power advocates, Latinos, gays, lesbians and more.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Purdue University Libraries will extend hours and offer special services at four facilities to help students prepare for final exams, which are May 4-9.

Additionally, the John W. Hicks Undergraduate Library will offer special activities to help students alleviate stress.

The Siegesmund Engineering; John W. Hicks Undergraduate; Humanities, Social Science and Education; and Roland G. Parrish libraries all will extend hours. The hours will be:

* Siegesmund Engineering – Beginning at 11 a.m. Sunday (April 26) through 5 p.m. May 9, the library is open 24 hours a day.

* John W. Hicks Undergraduate Library – Beginning at 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26) through 5 p.m. May 9, the library is open around the clock.

* HSSE Library – The library will be open 1 p.m. to midnight on Sunday (April 26); 7 a.m. to midnight from Monday (April 27) through April 30; 11 a.m. to midnight on May 2; 1 p.m. to 2 a.m. May 3; 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. May 4-7; 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. May 8; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 9.

* Roland G. Parrish Library – The library will open at 11 a.m. Sunday (April 26). Monday (April 27) through midnight May 1, open around the clock; May 2 – 10:30 a.m. to midnight; May 3 – opens at 11 a.m.; May 4-7 – open around the clock; May 8 – closes at midnight; May 9 – 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

During extended hours, Libraries staff will be on site to assist students, and refreshments will be provided.

All other libraries will maintain regular hours.

To help students relieve the stress of finals week, special activities will take place in the Common Area of Hicks Undergraduate Library from Monday (April 27) through May 6. These include:

* Monday (April 27). 6-7 p.m. Game Night. Students can visit the iDesk to get a snack and borrow a board or card game to take a break from studying.

* April 28. 6-7 p.m. Blow Stress Away. Hicks staff will be outside the library’s main entrance with bubbles and sidewalk chalk.

* April 29. 6-7 p.m. Massage therapists from Purdue’s Division of Recreational Sports will offer quick chair massages.

* May 4. 6-7 p.m. Massage therapists from Purdue’s Division of Recreational Sports will offer quick chair massages.

* May 5. 6-7 p.m. – Blow Stress Away. Hicks staff will be outside the library’s main entrance with bubbles and sidewalk chalk.

* May 6. 6-7 p.m. Game Night: Game Night. Students can visit the iDesk to get a snack and borrow a board or card game to take a break from studying.

In addition to these events, the Hicks library will have art relaxation and bubble wrap stations located around the library. New this year, the library also will have a Lego table located near the iDesk. Banners will be available to sign for therapy dogs that were scheduled to be part of the de-stressing activities but cannot due to the canine flu outbreak.

For more information, contact Danielle Schiewer at dschiewe@purdue.edu, 765-494-6733, or Ann O’Donnell at atodonne@purdue.edu, 765-496-1498.

Contact: Beth McNeil, 765-496-2900, memcneil@purdue.edu

On Saturday, February 15, 2014 ProQuest will make improvements to its internal systems to accommodate a growing number of users and to reduce the need for future downtime.

An eight hour (8) maintenance window is needed to perform these enhancements, lasting from 10:00 EST through 06:00 EST. During this time, all ProQuest resources will be unavailable.

A complete list of ProQuest resources can be found here: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/titlelists/tl-menu.shtml

For more information, contact Rebecca Richardson, Electronic Resources Librarian, Purdue University Libraries at (765) 494-9250 or rarichar@purdue.edu.

Purdue University Libraries services will be offline from late this Friday, Dec. 20 at 9 p.m. to early Sunday, Dec. 22 at 9 a.m. for a power outage on our server room building in the Math building.  Service are expected to resume on Sunday, Dec. 22 at 9 a.m. 

 

As part of the Libraries ongoing review of databases, the following has been recommended for cancellation by the subject specialist librarians: Stat!Ref.
With the removal of some titles from Stat!Ref by their publishers and available alternative access to other titles, Stat!Ref has been cancelled and will no longer be available starting Nov. 25th.  Drug information resources can be found at:  http://guides.lib.purdue.edu/druginforesources. Access to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) will be available January 2014.
Questions or concerns about the cancellation of Stat!Ref should be directed to Rebecca Richardson, Electronic Resources Librarian, at rarichar@purdue.edu.