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‘SPEC’ category

 

Courtesy of Purdue News Service

The public will have a chance to get a closer glimpse into Purdue alumnus Neil Armstrong’s life through an exhibition presented by Purdue Archives and Special Collections.

“Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” opens March 18 and runs through Aug. 16. The exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first manned spaceflight that landed on the moon – where Armstrong took those famed first steps. The exhibition, which is free and open to the public, coincides with the university’s July celebration of the moon landing, as well as the university’s sesquicentennial celebration, 150 Years of Giant Leaps.

Tracy Grimm, associate head of Archives and Special Collections and Barron Hilton Archivist for flight and space exploration conducts a tour of “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” exhibition. The exhibition is open from March 18 until Aug. 16. (Purdue University/ Mark Simons)

Tracy Grimm, associate head of Archives and Special Collections and Barron Hilton Archivist for flight and space exploration conducts a tour of “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” exhibition. The exhibition is open from March 18 until Aug. 16. (Purdue University/ Mark Simons)

“Neil wanted his collections to be used for both scholarship and research at his alma mater,” said Tracy Grimm, associate head of Purdue Archives and Special Collections and the Barron Hilton Archivist for Flight and Space Exploration, and curator of the exhibition. “Students and researchers have the unique opportunity to have a behind-the-scenes look at Neil’s life and legacy when they conduct research using Neil’s personal papers. This exhibition offers the public an opportunity to get to know Armstrong and the steps leading up to the Apollo 11 mission through access to Armstrong’s papers.”

The exhibition charts Armstrong’s experiences leading up to Apollo 11 mission, including training and coursework, planning for how and where to land on the moon, the success of the mission itself, and the impact it had on society. The following 11 items represent a portion of the items the public can expect to see on display at “Apollo in the Archives”:

  • An Apollo 11 flight suit, worn by Armstrong;
  • Armstrong’s NASA astronaut program acceptance letter;
  • A script for a skit written by Armstrong and Elliot See Jr., both part of the Gemini 5 backup crew;
  • A bag of Gemini 8 capsule personal items;
  • LLRV lunar lander research vehicle pilot flight checklist;
  • Apollo translunar/transearth trajectory plotting chart from the Apollo 11 mission;
  • Lunar dust disturbance on descent memorandum;
  • Model of Apollo lunar lander, made by the Grumman Corp;
  • Purdue centennial flag flown to the moon on Apollo 11 in 1969;
  • Apollo 11 lunar module lunar surface maps; and
  • Apollo 11 lunar module lunar ascent card.

Purdue Archives and Special Collections is open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. It is located in the Stewart Center inside the Humanities, Social Sciences and Education (HSSE) Library on the fourth floor of the library.

A Purdue centennial flag that was flown to the moon on Apollo 11 in 1969 is just one of many items on display in “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers.” (Purdue University/Mark Simons)

A Purdue centennial flag that was flown to the moon on Apollo 11 in 1969 is just one of many items on display in “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers.” (Purdue University/Mark Simons)

In addition to the “Apollo in the Archives,” Purdue’s Ringel Gallery, in partnership with Archives and Special Collections, will present the exhibition “Return to Entry,” which will feature artwork inspired by Armstrong’s archival collection, March 25 to May 11, in the Ringel Gallery, Stewart Center. A reception and a panel discussion will be held at 5:30 on April 4.

For this exhibition, the artists’ challenge was to bring art, engineering, and science together to imagine new horizons informed by archival documents and artifacts contained in the Armstrong Papers and the papers of other astronauts and engineers. This exhibition will feature work by Frances Gallardo, Michael Oatman, and Jennifer Scheuer, who will be part of the panel discussion on April 4.

These exhibitions are one of many events celebrating Purdue’s Sesquicentennial, 150 Years of Giant Leaps. The yearlong celebration is highlighting Purdue’s remarkable history of giant leaps, while focusing on what giant leaps Purdue can take to address the world’s problems. The celebration concludes in October with an astronaut reunion.

round the World in 150 Years: Purdue International Footprint

A new Purdue Archives and Special Collections exhibit that focuses on the experience of international students at Purdue University throughout the institution’s history is open!

“Around the World in 150 Years: Purdue International Footprint”

Items in the Purdue Archives and Special Collections exhibit “Around the World in 150 Years: Purdue’s International Footprint,” which runs through Friday, March 8.

“Around the World in 150 Years: Purdue’s International Footprint” highlights a variety of cultures, countries, activities, and time periods represented in the holdings of Archives and Special Collections, with a special focus on students who were among the first from their home countries to attend Purdue. Items on display include photographs, articles, and publications by or about international students, as well as artifacts given to the university by alumni groups from around the world.

According to Archivist for University History Adriana Harmeyer, the idea for the display came about as Purdue archivists have been considering the University’s Sesquicentennial, which is being commemorated through Homecoming 2019. She noted that a team of individuals in Purdue Archives helped curate the exhibit.

“As we mark Purdue’s 150th anniversary, we are looking back and celebrating the people who have made the University what it is today. The international student population has been a presence on campus for a longer period of time than many people realize, and international students have made amazing contributions to the academic and social life of campus,” she noted.

The exhibit includes materials from some of the earliest international student groups on campus, including the Cosmopolitan Club (established in 1909) and publications by the 1920s-era Chinese Students Association, including a “Chinese Students Year-Book” from 1927, Harmeyer added.

“Around the World in 150 Years: Purdue International Footprint” will run weekdays (Monday-Friday) from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. through Friday, March 8. The exhibit is on display in the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center, located on the fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library.

For more information, contact Harmeyer at aharmey@purdue.edu.

Courtesy of Abbey Nickel, Purdue Marketing and Media

Imagine being able to open a time capsule with just a click of a button.

The newly launched Purdue Campus Facilities and Buildings Historic Database allows users to take a closer look at the metamorphosis of Purdue’s buildings over the years that goes beyond just maps and illustrations.

Neal Harmeyer, digital archivist in Purdue University Libraries’ Division of Archives and Special Collections, debuted the historic online database this month that documents the historic grounds and structures of Purdue’s West Lafayette campus. The project took five years to complete.

Neal Harmeyer, digital archivist at Purdue University Archives and Special Collections talks about his the new Purdue Campus Facilities and Buildings Historic Database at a reception Nov. 13, 2018.

Neal Harmeyer, digital archivist at Purdue University Archives and Special Collections, debuted the new Purdue Campus Facilities and Buildings Historic Database at a reception Nov. 13, 2018. Photo by Teresa Koltzenburg.

Using an interactive map, researchers will be able to find and sort campus buildings by architects, contractors, university president at time of construction, building materials and keywords. Each building has data related to his specific history, including construction information, renovation information and images from various stages of their use.

Harmeyer has helped lead the creation of the exhibit, which was funded by a 2013 gift from Richard Funkhouser, professor emeritus.

Through studying the history of Purdue’s facilities, Harmeyer said the intention of the database is to help researchers understand and visualize Purdue’s growth over the years — and perhaps study how those facilities will impact Purdue’s future.

“The Historic Database will provide all members of the Purdue community the opportunity to experience the West Lafayette campus from an entirely new perspective,” Harmeyer said. “As the university has changed over its existence, the places Purdue students, faculty, and staff have visited, studied and lived have also changed. For the first time, there is a resource to search and study the physical campus, re-visit, and even share those experiences.”

Betty Nelson, dean of students emerita, and her husband, Dick, professor emeritus of educational studies, explore the new historic building database as computer science professor Chris Clifton looks on.

Betty Nelson, dean of students emerita, and her husband, Dick, professor emeritus of educational studies, explore the new historic building database as computer science professor Chris Clifton looks on. Photo by Teresa Koltzenburg.

Haymeyer said data has been gathered from archival collections, reports and publications regarding all known structures throughout the West Lafayette campus history. Priority is given to academic buildings, but the project encompasses non-academic buildings as well.

The database is entirely online. Digitized campus maps have been created to visualize the history of campus. Meanwhile, Purdue Libraries information technology staff have worked alongside those from Archives and Special Collections to create a database to incorporate that information.

Harmeyer hopes the database is also used for educational purposes in addition to traditional research.

“For example, Purdue Polytechnic or Engineering faculty can use the database to learn more about construction materials and building techniques over time,” Harmeyer said. “Or, political science students can analyze building numbers in micro or macro scales to determine economic trends in campus buildings infrastructure.”

And, of course, former Purdue students can check out just how much campus has changed since their days at the university.

The University Development Office and Archives and Special Collections are partnering to provide donor information data for different buildings on campus. All information related to donors is maintained and managed by the development office, and information is being added or amended in the Database incrementally.

Harmeyer said the database will continue to be maintained, and information will be added on an annual basis to reflect new buildings or demolition of older buildings.

Purdue Libraries’ Geographic Information Systems and Digital Programs also assisted with the development of the project. Explore the Purdue Campus Facilities and Buildings Historic Database at http://collections.lib.purdue.edu/campus/.


Editor’s Note: The article is also posted at www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2018/Q4/travel-back-in-time-with-purdue-archives-new-online-building-database.html.

A Look Back Exhibit in Purdue Libraries' HSSE Library, Fall 2018

“A Look Back” in the HSSE Library was designed by Purdue Libraries Professor Judy Nixon, Director of Purdue Libraries Facilities Nanette Andersson, Library Assistant Pat Whalen, and the “A Look Back”-exhibit planning team.

“A Look Back” is a new exhibit in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library that pays tribute to Purdue University’s first Library in University Hall.

The event “Celebrating the History of Purdue Libraries”–to highlight the display and commemorate Purdue Libraries’ history–is set from 3-4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 in the Periodical Reading Room on the first floor of the HSSE Library. The event is open free to the public.

At 3:30 p.m., Purdue Libraries Professor Judy Nixon will provide a brief background about the exhibit and introduce David Hovde, Professor Emeritus, Purdue University Archives and Special Collections. Hovde will share his work on his book about the history of Purdue Libraries. At 4:15 p.m. attendees can take part in a tour of the 1913 stacks.

The display in HSSE Library was designed by Nixon, Director of Purdue Libraries Facilities Nanette Andersson, Library Assistant Pat Whalen, and the “A Look Back”-exhibit planning team.

“A Look Back” is part of the Purdue University’s Sesquicentennial Celebration, 150 Years of Giant Leaps. Learn more at takegiantleaps.com.

Purdue University Libraries Professor Sammie Morris and Assistant Professor Nastasha Johnson are part of a Purdue University interdisciplinary team that received a grant from the National Historical Records and Publications Commission (NHPRC) “to provide training for archivists across the country by developing and facilitating the Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) for the next generation of archivist leaders.”

Last month, the Purdue Polytechnic Institute announced the award.

The announcement, below, appears here courtesy of Purdue Polytechnic Institute Director of Marketing and Communications Melissa Templeton.

Purdue University Libraries’ faculty Sammie Morris and Nastasha Johnson are part of a Purdue University interdisciplinary team that received a grant from the National Historical Records and Publications Commission (NHPRC) “to provide training for archivists across the country by developing and facilitating the Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) for the next generation of archivist leaders."

Mesut Akdere, associate professor of human resource development (HRD) and director of HRD Virtual Lab at the Purdue Polytechnic Institute, along with professors in Purdue Libraries and the Center for Intercultural Learning, Mentorship, Assessment, and Research (CILMAR), received a grant from the National Historical Records and Publications Commission (NHPRC) to provide training for archivists across the country by developing and facilitating the Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) for the next generation of archivist leaders. The new program, ALI@Purdue, will provide advanced training for archival leaders in the United States, giving them the knowledge and tools to transform the profession in practice, theory and attitude.

Other members of the multidisciplinary project include Sammie Morris, professor and director in the Purdue University Libraries Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center; Nastasha Johnson, assistant professor in Purdue Libraries; and Kris Acheson-Clair, associate director of intercultural pedagogy and scholarship at CILMAR.

The grant’s three-year funding will enable the use of virtual reality, an immersive learning technology new to the field of archives, to train 20 archivists each year from across the country. The project will create more interculturally and technologically competent leaders in the archives profession who are prepared to advocate on behalf of their institutions as well as the broader archives field.

“This is really about incorporating future learning technology into the field of archives,” Akdere said of the project. “Virtual reality provides hands-on, immersive experiences which supports the development of trainees’ cognitive abilities.”

Akdere also highlighted various capacity enhancement opportunities associated with the ground-breaking use of virtual reality technology, which will allow ALI trainee archivists to conduct various workshops in their respective institutions. Trainees will also learn how to develop and share their own virtual reality training simulations.

“Our virtual reality training has the potential create a powerful cascade effect, making it possible for even more archivists to learn, transform and share their work,” said Akdere.

Learn more about ALI@Purdue at polytechnic.purdue.edu/ali.

Stephanie Schmitz is the first Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Archivist at Purdue University.

Stephanie Schmitz pictured in the Purdue Archives and Special Collections. (Photo by Purdue Marketing & Media)

Purdue University Libraries’ unique archive on psychoactive substances research has been named and is now known as the Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Collection. Recently, with Gordon’s support, Purdue Libraries established an endowed archivist position in the Purdue Archives and Special Collections (a division of the Libraries) to lead and grow collections relating to the history of psychedelics research.

Stephanie Schmitz is the first Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Archivist at Purdue University (effective July 1, 2018).

First established in 2006 with generous funding provided by the Betsy Gordon Foundation, the archival collections comprise unique materials that document the history of psychoactive substances and their applications for medicine and healing. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of research studies surrounding psychedelics, e.g., the Heffter Research Institute‘s studies on psilocybin for cancer distress and addiction.

“I am pleased to be able to help in developing, through Purdue Libraries’ Archives and Special Collections, an archive and library centered on the work of so many dedicated chemists and clinicians who have worked in the field of psychoactive substances,” noted Gordon, a founder of the collecting initiative, who recently donated funds to name the collection and endow the archivist position. “As we have learned from the past, psychoactive substances hold untold potential in the area of reducing human suffering and healing. With such an archive, and through sharing with other universities and research institutions, all the work can be collectively stored and shared through this collection at Purdue,” she added.

Photograph of an article on "The Hallucinogenic Drugs" from a 1964 issue of Scientific American. Image courtesy of the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections

Photograph of an article on “The Hallucinogenic Drugs” from a 1964 issue of Scientific American. Image courtesy of the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections

According to Purdue University Archivist, Head of Archives and Special Collections, and Professor Sammie Morris, the renaissance in research surrounding the use of psychedelics for mental, physical, and spiritual health is attracting a growing number of scholars to Purdue to use the collection.

“Substances that once brought panic and fear to the public are now being recognized as having substantial health benefits in treating post-traumatic stress disorders, addiction, individuals facing terminal illnesses, and other health concerns,” she noted. “What many people may not know is that there is a long and rich history of psychedelics research conducted by psychiatrists, scientists, and health care professionals prior to the association of these substances with the counterculture movement. The past discoveries and research findings are highly relevant today in informing the future of this research.”

The Premier Collection in Psychoactive Substances

Betsy Gordon

Betsy Gordon (Image courtesy of Gordon)

In 2006, Gordon and David Nichols, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology at Purdue, recognized the need to create a unique collection on the history of psychoactive substances research. According to Morris, the collection has increased dramatically over the last 12 years.

“The scholarship and learning that have resulted from the use of this growing collection would not be possible without Gordon,” Morris noted. “The Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Collection is the premier archival collection of its kind in the United States. It is the only major research collecting effort in the nation specifically centered on acquiring the original, historical primary-source papers of researchers in the field. Other libraries and museums have some collections on this topic, but no other academic institution has been dedicated to collecting these types of one-of-a-kind, original documents, images, and artifacts comprehensively. These items are critical to supporting an understanding of the history of psychedelics research.”

The endowment of the archivist position allows the collecting effort to expand and ensures the sustainability of the collection into the future, Morris added.

The collection benefits researchers in a wide array of disciplines, attracting historians, anthropologists, chemists, and clinical psychologists. Scholars have traveled from around the world to consult the collection, and faculty and students at Purdue and in the local community routinely use the collections for teaching and learning.

Schmitz has led the collecting initiative since 2007. She frequently collaborates with faculty to incorporate the collections into Purdue’s educational mission.

Assorted publications from the Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Collection. Image courtesy of the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections

Assorted publications from the Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Collection. Image courtesy of the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections

“One of the most compelling things I do is to introduce this fascinating and interdisciplinary area of research to others. There is nothing more gratifying than witnessing the trajectory of archival materials from their inactive use while still in the possession of the donor, to their transfer to archives, and ultimately into the hands of scholars, where their work is referenced in publications such as books, journals, and presentations, further legitimizing this area of research,” Schmitz noted. “These collections of archival materials capture the triumphs and struggles of the work that was carried out in the past, helping to inform current and future research. Betsy’s generous gift will allow me to take this collecting area to new levels, increasing our acquisition of collections, promoting them for research use, and using them in course instruction,” she added.

Purdue University Department of History Dema G. Seelye Chair in the History of Medicine Wendy Kline said the collection is one of the most valuable sources she has encountered on the history of psychiatry and mental health.

“My forthcoming book, ‘Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth’ [Oxford University Press, 2018] draws on the papers to demonstrate the curious and fascinating connections between alternative birth and psychedelics,” Kline explained. “This collection draws historians from all over the globe, and it will continue to draw in more scholars as interest in these substances and their history grows, as it undoubtedly will. I have used the papers in undergraduate history research seminars and witnessed students come to life as they discover the collection’s fascinating contents. It has made them rethink the connections among science, medicine, and the counterculture.”

These substances, when used in appropriate settings under care of a medical professional, have been shown to increase the quality of life for people suffering from a wide array of illnesses from cancer patients to veterans of war to individuals who have had lifelong struggles with addiction.

“Works by authors such as Michael Pollan (‘How to Change Your Mind’) are informing the public about the health benefits of psychedelics and their potential in addressing issues of national concern, such as the opioid crisis,” noted Interim Dean of Libraries Rhonda Phillips. “The Libraries is proud to hold a comprehensive collection of archival materials dedicated to this research, to preserve and share the history of psychedelics for current and future generations of scholars.”

Learn more about the Betsy Gordon Psychoactive Substances Research Collection at http://collections.lib.purdue.edu/psychoactive/.

For more information, contact Schmitz at sschmit@purdue.edu.

Building Purdue - Aug. 27-Dec. 14 - Purdue Archives and Special CollectionsPurdue University Archives and Special Collections (ASC) latest exhibit highlights the physical growth and evolution of Purdue‘s West Lafayette campus since the University was founded in 1869. “Building Purdue: 150 Years of the West Lafayette Campus” will be on display from Monday, Aug. 27–Friday, Dec. 14 in the ASC (located on the fourth floor of the Humanities, Social Science, and Education, or HSSE, Library in Stewart Center). Exhibition hours are 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, and it is free and open to the public.

According to Digital Archivist Neal Harmeyer, who curated the exhibit, the display will include selected maps, photographs, documents, and artifacts that tell the story of campus—with a focus on its construction—as Purdue nears the sesquicentennial.

“Prominent topics are the fire of Heavilon Hall that inspired ‘One Brick Higher,’ the creation of the Purdue Memorial Union, the University during and after the World Wars, and the ever-changing nature of the campus all Boilermakers call home,” Harmeyer noted.

Later this year, Archives and Special Collections will launch the Campus Buildings and Facilities Project, a searchable database documenting the full history of the physical West Lafayette campus.

The exhibit helps Purdue Archives and Special Collections, a division of Purdue Libraries, kick off Purdue University’s Sesquicentennial Campaign, 150 Years of Giant Leaps. The campaign is a yearlong celebration of Purdue, its remarkable people, its unique history, and its visionary drive to meet the world’s future challenges. From Homecoming 2018 through Homecoming 2019, the Purdue community will spend the year celebrating its unique legacy, which has included giant leaps across every field of endeavor, and further advancing the mission set forth since its founding as a land-grant university in 1869. With the campaign serving as a springboard for a renewed commitment to growth, innovation, and discovery, Purdue’s call is simple: Whatever your pursuit, take Giant Leaps.

For more information about “Building Purdue: 150 Years of the West Lafayette Campus,” contact Harmeyer at harmeyna@purdue.edu.

#TakeGiantLeaps

A new exhibit, “The Sixties: A Decade of Triumph, Struggle, and Change” from Purdue University Archives and Special Collections, a division of Purdue Libraries, features a rich variety of artifacts, photographs, and documents, all from the Archives’ collections. According to Archivist for University History Adriana Harmeyer, the artifacts and displays spotlight the student experience at Purdue throughout the eventful decade.

The exhibit is free and open to the public from 1-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday in the Archives and Special Collections, located on the fourth floor of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library, Stewart Center. An exhibit open house is set from 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 in the Archives and Special Collections, and the event will include light refreshments, activities for children, and a chance to meet the exhibit curators.

“Student scrapbooks, senior cords, and underground student newspapers appear alongside aeronautics textbooks, Rose Bowl tickets, and Grand Prix programs,” noted Harmeyer and Digital Preservation and Electronic Records Archivist Carly Dearborn, who both curated the exhibit. “Topics range from Purdue’s astronaut alumni to the 1969 centennial celebrations to student protests that marked the final years of the decade.”

“The Sixties: A Decade of Triumph, Struggle, and Change” is on display through Friday, Aug. 10 in Purdue University Archives and Special Collections.

For more information, contact Harmeyer at aharmey@purdue.edu or Dearborn at cdearbor@purdue.edu.

For our final From the Archives photo this semester, we look way, way back to the Archives’ oldest photo of campus.  Where is this?  Can you identify any of the buildings?  When would this have been taken? Share your ideas in the comments and check back on Friday to learn the details about this photo.

 

UPDATE:

This early view of Purdue was captured in 1876, only two years after Purdue first offered classes.

The buildings are, from left to right:

  • Ladies Hall, which served as a residence for faculty members and their families before becoming the home of art classes and residence for female students
  • Building Number 2, later known as the Pharmacy Building, which was the first classroom building on campus
  • The Gas and Boiler House, which kept campus running
  • A barn
  • Men’s Dormitory, which was later turned into a classroom building known as Purdue Hall
  • Military Hall and Gymnasium

Just visible in the middle of the picture is the construction site that would become University Hall, which opened the following year.  University Hall became the oldest building still standing on campus when Purdue Hall was demolished in 1960.

Many photos of campus were taken from this exact angle over the years, but this is the only one that does not yet have University Hall in the center.

Purdue in 1891

Purdue in 1891

Purdue in 2005

Purdue in 2005

Thank you to everyone who has joined us for this series of mystery photos.  We will have many more exciting highlights from the Archives to share during Purdue’s sesquicentennial celebrations beginning this fall!

In this photograph, we see an important part of campus that has moved many times during its existence, housed in a building that is still standing today.  Can you identify this space and where it was located?  When was this image captured?  What details stand out to you?  Share your ideas in the comments and we will reveal the story behind the image on Friday.

UPDATE:

University Hall was built in the center of campus in 1877, and in the center of University Hall stood the library. In this image, captured on October 21, 1899, we see the library with its grand central staircase, busts and artwork on the walls, banners celebrating class victories during Field Day each year, the librarian’s desk in the middle of the room, display cabinets for artifacts, and bookshelves on the second floor.  The library eventually outgrew this space and moved in 1913 to its own building, which is now part of Stewart Center.

The image below shows an art exhibit in the University Hall Library in 1896.

Art exhibit, 1896

Please join us again on Monday, April 23, for our next From the Archives mystery photo.