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Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Esther Ellis Norton Professor of Library Science Beth McNeil

The Purdue University Board of Trustees on Thursday (Oct. 10) ratified the appointment of Beth McNeil as the Esther Ellis Norton Professor of Library Science.

McNeil is dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies. She is a nationally known scholar of management practices in libraries and leadership development. She is the author of “Fundamentals of Library Supervision,” which is in its third edition, as well as numerous articles, edited works, and book chapters.

She rejoined the Purdue faculty in July 2019, having previously been at Purdue from 2007-15 as associate dean in Libraries.

Read the entire BOT release at www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2019/Q4/purdue-trustees-approve-faculty-appointments.html.

October is National Medical Librarians Month, and Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies (PULSIS) Assistant Professor and Health Sciences Information Specialist Bethany McGowan, who has close to ten years of academic medical librarian experience, notes that 2019 brings medical librarians two years into the current U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) Strategic Plan, 2017-2027. Below, she shares the kind of work she does as a medical librarian at Purdue and in the field of library science.

Bethany McGowan, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Bethany McGowan

by Bethany McGowan

The NLM Strategic Plan, 2017-2027, focuses on three goals:

  • accelerating discovery and advancing health by providing the tools for data-driven research,
  • reaching more people in more ways through enhanced dissemination and engagement pathways, and
  • building a workforce for data-driven research and health.

The NLM strategic plan, along with the PULSIS strategic plan, guide my work as a medical librarian. As assistant professor and a health sciences information specialist, I focus on information literacy and data literacy instruction. This includes working with health sciences faculty to scaffold information literacy (IL) instruction throughout curriculums, through course design programs, such as IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Transformation), and by establishing collaborations with the health sciences faculty who influence curriculum development, at the individual course level and across curriculums at a programmatic level.

Relatedly, I co-chair an Association of College and Research Libraries working group to redesign the outdated Information Literacy Competency Standards for Nursing into a Framework for Information Literacy for Nursing. After a comprehensive literature review and surveying nursing faculty across nine research and teaching colleges and universities, our working group has concluded that scaffolding information literacy throughout course and program curriculum provides the most comprehensive means to disseminate information literacy instruction and engage students. We are working hard to develop a practical tool that will make it easier for librarians to build connections with nursing faculty, to better understand strategies for integrating information literacy instruction across course and program curriculums, and to better understand student-centered approaches for information literacy instruction.

I support data-driven research and believe that libraries are the perfect place to teach data literacy via extracurricular data challenges like “hackathons” and “datathons.” My research focuses on strategies for engaging participants who might not otherwise compete in data challenges, like health sciences students, women, and minorities.

I was recently awarded an NLM grant to explore why students participate in and drop out of data challenges, and I will use my findings to create an open educational resource that librarians can use to recruit and retain diverse participation in these events.

I’m also leading the team planning the 2020 Purdue Women in Data Science (WiDS) datathon and conference, events focused on highlighting the contributions of women in data science.

Finally, I’m interested in the global impacts of the open data and open access movements. I have been active with the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Health and Biosciences Section for the past few years, and this year, I was elected information officer for the section. As our section collaborates with the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) to plan the 2021 AHILA Congress in South Africa. I plan to use the experience to consider how my expertise might support the data and information interests and needs of librarians in African countries. I hope it will be a launchpad for future collaborations.

Ultimately, the work I do is incredibly fulfilling, and I’m proud to be a part of such a supportive community. Happy National Medical Librarians Month to all my fellow medical librarians!

October is Health Literacy Month, and to commemorate it, we asked Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Health Sciences Information Specialist and Assistant Professor Jason Reed to share what he does in his work to support Purdue University faculty, students, and staff.

Jason Reed, Assistant Professor and Health Sciences Information Specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Jason Reed, Assistant Professor and Health Sciences Information Specialist, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

What Does a Health Sciences Information Specialist Do?

by Jason Reed, Health Sciences Information Specialist and Assistant Professor

Regularly, I collaborate with faculty, staff, and students to support research and learning in health sciences disciplines. My assigned areas include the Purdue Department of Health and Kinesiology, the Purdue College of Pharmacy‘s Professional Program, and the Purdue Department of Public Health.

A key component of my work involves supporting evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is a framework that encourages health practitioners to use scientific evidence to guide decisions, along with patient preferences and their own acquired knowledge, and focuses on how students will continue to discover, evaluate, and implement new information throughout their health careers.

A few examples of how I collaborate with my liaison units to support EBP through teaching include:

  • working with athletic training students to teach them how to discover information for use in Critically Appraised Topics, a type of EBP that focuses on using a literature review to answer clinical questions.
  • In health and kinesiology I provide instruction to students on searching for intervention studies guided by behavioral theories to support creating/starting a public health initiative.
  • In the College of Pharmacy Professional Program, I teach lab sessions for the first- and second-year students. In these labs, we discuss the importance of EBP and how to determine the best resource to use for answering questions and how to best use those resources to find evidence supporting their clinical questions.

In all of these examples, I include in class activities to provide an opportunity for the students to engage with and practice the skills discussed in class, not only to help them develop a mastery of the skills, but also to provide opportunities for the students to seek clarification on aspects they don’t fully understand.

On the research side, I have been very active in working on systematic reviews. High-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses are considered the highest levels of evidence in evidence-based practice and are guided by a set of guidelines, PRISMA Checklist.

Systematic reviews strive to discover and assess all materials relating to a specific research question, with the goal of answering that question within the limits of the available evidence. One of the recommendations for completing a systematic review is including a database expert on the team. That is the role I have filled on several systematic reviews from multiple colleges and departments on campus including the Professional Program in the College of Pharmacy, Purdue Department of Public Health, Purdue Department of Health and Kinesiology, and Purdue Department of Nutrition.

This work on systematic reviews has led to an opportunity to co-instruct, with Bethany McGowan, a course on systematic reviews offered to graduate students as a Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies’ designated course. This course was offered for the first time in the spring 2019 semester, we had 10 students from four different programs on campus.

The instruction focuses on teaching students how to prepare their review projects to meet the standards of a systematic review by teaching them the best practices for designing a search strategy, identifying the people and tools they will use in their review, and considering any potential biases in the project.


Learn more about other areas of Jason Reed’s work at http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/2019/02/08/climate-change-game-reed/.

Matt Hannah, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Dr. Matt Hannah

Developing and advancing Purdue University’s Digital Humanities (DH) initiative — an important and growing area in digital scholarship — is among the many duties of Matt Hannah, assistant professor of DH in Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies (PULSIS).

Hannah, who arrived at Purdue in March 2018, has been busily laying the foundation for an ongoing and robust discussion about DH and digital scholarship across campus. He has designed and delivered a wide range of DH workshops, taught digital humanities courses, contributed to digital scholarship projects and efforts on campus and beyond, and has established the DH Studio in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library.


What: Digital Humanities Studio Open House
When: 3-6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14
Where: Stewart Center 153 (inside the HSSE Library)


Dr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Dr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick

To celebrate this growing and vibrant DH initiative, PULSIS will host an open house to launch the DH Studio from 3-6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14. The DH Studio is located in Stewart Center, room 153 (on the first floor of HSSE Library).

The event will feature remarks by Kathleen Fitzpatrick, director of DH and a professor of English at Michigan State University, as well as opening remarks by Dean of Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Beth McNeil and Erla Heyns, head of of the HSSEB (humanities, social sciences, education, and business), div. of PULSIS.

“Kathleen Fitzpatrick has been instrumental in developing the DH center at MSU,” Hannah noted. “We are delighted to have her help us officially launch our own DH Studio, a space dedicated to providing a hub for digital scholarship in the humanities and social sciences at Purdue.”

Prior to joining MSU, Fitzpatrick served as an associate executive director and director of scholarly communication of the Modern Language Association (MLA), where she was managing editor of MLA publications. She has also held an appointment as a visiting research professor of English at New York University and visiting professor of media studies at Coventry University. She is the author of “Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019) and “Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy” (NYU Press, 2011).

ILS 695,"Introducing Digital Humanities" course, Spring 2019, Purdue University.

Dr. Matt Hannah, assistant professor of digital humanities in the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, with members of his ILS 695, “Introducing Digital Humanities,” course, Spring 2019, at Purdue University.

Fitzpatrick is the project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 10,000 scholars and practitioners in the humanities. She co-founded the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she led experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing. She serves on the editorial or advisory boards of various publications and projects, including the Open Library of the Humanities, Luminos, the Open Annotation Collaboration, and PressForward. She also currently serves as the chair of the board of directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources.

At 7:30 p.m. (Oct. 14) in the Lawson Computer Science Building, room 1142, Fitzpatrick will deliver the lecture, “Generous Thinking: a Radical Approach to Saving the University,” which is sponsored by the Purdue Dept. of English. Her evening lecture is co-sponsored by the Purdue Dept. of Political Science, the Purdue American Studies Program, Purdue School of Languages and Cultures, as well as the Office of the Provost, the Purdue Teaching Academy, and the American Association of University Professors (AAUP).

For more information, contact Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

A 2017 Library Scholars Grant recipient, Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler, assistant professor of design history in Purdue University’s Department of Art and Design (College of Liberal Arts) presented the results of her archival research on March 8, 2018, in the Purdue Memorial Union. Professor Kaufmann-Buhler conducted her research at the Manuscripts and Archives Library of Yale University in New Haven.

A 2017 Library Scholars Grant recipient, Jennifer Kaufmann-Buhler, assistant professor of design history in Purdue University’s Department of Art and Design (College of Liberal Arts) presented the results of her archival research in 2018. Professor Kaufmann-Buhler conducted her research at the Manuscripts and Archives Library of Yale University.

Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies will once again sponsor the Library Scholars Grant Program in 2019-20. The grant-award program supports access to unique collections of information found around the country and the world, and untenured tenure-track faculty members and associate professors tenured effective July 1, 2017, or later, from the Purdue West Lafayette, Fort Wayne, IUPUI, and Northwest campuses, and the Statewide Technology Program are eligible. Awards of up to $5,000 will be made for this purpose, with grant-supported activities to be completed by December 31, 2020.

Applicants are required to have a conversation with a librarian, who must write a letter of support for a proposal. Applicants who are members of Libraries and School of Information Studies’ faculty must consult with their supervisors regarding the time and effort involved in the activities reflected in the proposal and include a letter of support from a supervisor/FRC.

All proposals must be submitted by email to Libraries Administration, libinfo@purdue.edu, with the Subject: Library Scholars Grant, no later than 5 p.m., Friday, November 8, 2019.

Additional information about eligibility and submission guidelines is available at www.lib.purdue.edu/scholars/.

For questions about the Library Scholars Grant Program, contact Michael Witt, interim associate dean for research, at mwitt@purdue.edu.

Matt Hannah, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Matt Hannah

Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah has been busily laying the foundation for an ongoing and robust discussion about digital humanities (DH) and to advance digital scholarship overall at Purdue. Since he started at Purdue in March 2018, he has put together and delivered many DH workshops and contributed to many digital scholarship projects and efforts on campus, and is developing a DH Studio in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library.

Recently, he also launched the Digital Interest Group at Purdue, which will meet monthly. Group members will discuss key scholarship ideas, projects, and concepts in DH, computational social sciences, Critical Data Studies, science and technology studies, digital history, data science, and more. The first meeting is set for 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11; visit http://bit.ly/dhigpurdue to sign up for the group (location to TBD). According to Hannah (who goes by @TinkeringHuman on Twitter), the group will also tinker with various methodologies and tools, write and share code, and discuss digital projects.

“We imagine this interest group will become a hub for anyone at Purdue interested in digital scholarship broadly conceived,” he noted.

In addition to advancing DH at Purdue, Hannah will advance DH internationally, as he has recently accepted a fellowship as a Fulbright Specialist with a few institutions in Morocco to set up a DH boot camp for digital scholars there.

Below, Hannah shares more about his upcoming fellowship and the DH work he will be doing in Morocco over the next three years.

Q. How did you come to know about this opportunity?

Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Matt Hannah works in the programming language R in his office in the DH Studio located in the HSSE Library. In the spring of 2019, offered a text analysis workshop series using R.

Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Matt Hannah works in the programming language R in his office in the DH Studio located in the HSSE Library. In the spring of 2019, he offered a text analysis workshop series using R.

Hannah: Because of the work we’ve been doing in Digital Humanities at Purdue, I was contacted by Dr. Stacy Holden, an associate professor of history at Purdue, who specializes in the Middle East. She has been working in Morocco for many years, and she’s currently there on a Fulbright fellowship. She articulated an interest in Digital Humanities among faculty and staff she’s collaborated with in Morocco and suggested I apply for a Fulbright Specialist fellowship to organize intensive Digital Humanities workshops to be conducted over several days. I then worked with Dr. Christopher Lukasic to prepare an application, and, for a time, we weren’t sure whether our idea would be successful.

Q. You mentioned you will work with individuals in institutions in Morocco to set up a Digital Humanities boot camp. Tell me more about this project and/or projects. What will they entail?

Hannah: Fulbright Specialists serve shorter terms, generally around a particular project in which an expert in the field may be paired with an overseas institution to collaborate. Through Dr. Holden’s contacts in Morocco, I’ve been in communication with colleagues at Abdelmalek Essaadi University in Tétouan and Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane to arrange week-long intensive Digital Humanities workshops. These workshops will cover the range of possible tools and methods so participants will gain a wide ranging set of skills in DH by the end of the week. In addition, I will coordinate with faculty and staff to consult on existing projects and initiatives.

Q. What do you hope to achieve with your boot camps?

Hannah: I am hoping to develop great relationships with Moroccan digital humanists and develop a strong network of international collaboration around the topic of digital scholarship. In addition, I plan to consult with faculty working on DH projects and lend assistance where I can. Finally, I hope to develop an intensive curriculum that I can teach at other universities around the world. I’m grateful to Fulbright for making such international relationships possible.

Q. What is the timeline for your boot camps over the next three years? Any collaborators you want to recognize, share information about?

Hannah: I’d love to visit other universities in Morocco to conduct similar workshops. Often, Digital Humanities gets discussed as though it were only an Anglo-American phenomenon, when we know scholars around the world are doing dynamic and exciting work. I also hope to develop this boot camp series into an offering I can teach at other international universities and colleges, as well as offer to interested parties at Purdue.

Q. Any other information that will be important to include that isn’t touched on the questions above?

Hannah: One key aspect of the Fulbright role is to gain knowledge from my hosts. I’m very much looking forward to discovering what Digital Humanities looks like in the Moroccan context and, through a process of collaboration, to expand my own scholarly horizons through the sustained conversations made possible by the Fulbright program.


For more information about DH at Purdue, contact Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

The Aviation Technology (AvTech) Library will be closed during the 2019 fall semester for renovations. During this time, the AvTech collection will not be accessible. Other library services will be available as follows:

  • Book returns: A book return drop-box is located in the lobby of the Niswonger Aviation Technology Building.
  • Requests: Even though the Aviation Technology Library collection will not be available during the fall semester, patrons may make requests for books, articles, etc., through Interlibrary Loan (www.lib.purdue.edu/services/interlibrary-loan). When notified, patrons can pick up items at the Library of Engineering and Science information desk (Wilmeth Active Learning Center, second floor).
  • Reserves: Course reserves can be accessed at the Library of Engineering & Science reference desk (WALC, second floor) . Some faculty members have made alternate arrangements for reserves, which they will communicate to their students.

We apologize for this temporary inconvenience and thank you for your understanding and patience while we renovate the AvTech Library. When the library reopens on January 2, 2020, there will be more space available and an improved atmosphere in which to study and utilize library services.

For more information, contact Operations Manager Craig Leavell at cleavell@purdue.edu.

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil

Those of us who work in our unit at Purdue could not be more excited we have our new leader, Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies and Professor Beth McNeil, in place!

Formerly the dean of library services and professor at Iowa State University, Dean McNeil started July 1, and she has been in a whirlwind of meetings, email messages, activities, events, and moving preparations since. (Our unit’s administration has been in Potter 160 with the ongoing HVAC work in Stewart Center; we are set to move back to the second floor of STEW soon.)

Dean McNeil is no stranger to Purdue. Previously, she was Purdue’s associate dean for academic affairs and a professor of Purdue Libraries. Before her initial appointment at Purdue, McNeil was assistant, and then associate, dean of libraries for the University of Nebraska. She also has held positions in the libraries at Bradley University and the University of Illinois.

As we navigate our new identity as a school at Purdue, you will all be hearing more from and about Dean McNeil. But, for now, below is a short Q&A that provides a glimpse into a bit more about her.

Welcome Dean McNeil!

Q: You have been back in Indiana and at Purdue now about one month now. What are some of the things you like about being back here in the Greater Lafayette Area? What do you and your family do outside of work for fun and relaxation?

McNeil: It’s great to be back on a campus that is so alive, even in the summer. My family includes my husband, Wes, who owns a small book company, and sons Nick (14) and Eli (10). My boys are active in sports, and we spend a lot of time outside of work at various games and in other outdoor activities. They have been visiting on weekends and will join me here in a few weeks, just before the start of school in West Lafayette.

During recent weekend visits we’ve done some hiking in Happy Hollow Park (a favorite activity when we lived here before), visited some local restaurants we remember fondly (Dog ‘n Suds ranks pretty high on the boys’ list), reconnecting with former neighbors and friends, and tackled a few projects in our new home. Last Saturday, we attended many of the Apollo 50th events, including the awesome “Apollo in the Archives: Selections from the Neil A. Armstrong Papers” exhibit in Purdue Archives and Special Collections, and the late afternoon F-100 flyover. Really, a wonderful experience for the whole family. Fun fact: If you look very closely, you can find us in some of the campus photos.

Q: Why did you decide to come back to Purdue to take the helm of the Purdue Libraries and newly named “Libraries and School of Information Studies”?

McNeil: Short answer: The opportunity. Plus, I like a challenge. Having been here before, I have some knowledge of campus and people, which has been beneficial to me so far, but there have been many changes in the past four years, and I want to take advantage of being “new” as well, to be sure my eyes and ears are wide open to new possibilities. Leading the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies is an amazing opportunity to support Purdue in educating students and producing research that will change the world. I expect it will be fun, too.

Q: What challenges ahead are the most exciting? Which are most pressing?

McNeil: The most exciting challenge is to expand our teaching in support of the new School of Information Studies. We have excellent faculty and staff ready to grow our course offerings, and my impression so far is that, collectively, we are excited about and ready for this challenge. Most pressing — for me — is to come up to speed on the many data-science-related happenings at Purdue and finding the places where we in the Libraries and School of Information Studies can contribute.

Q: Any other information you would like to impart that was not touched on in questions above?

McNeil: I am looking forward to visiting with faculty, staff, and students in the next few weeks, as I make my way around campus. Please feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions or want to share information or your opinions about the future of the Libraries and School of Information Studies.

Editor’s Note: Content in this post is courtesy of Stephanie Hernandez McGavin via Shared BigData-Gateway

A team of Purdue University researchers is among the seven fellowship teams selected for the first class of the Collaborative Archive Data Research Environment (CADRE) Fellows.

These seven fellowship teams span across disciplines and offer compelling research that incorporates big data and bibliometrics. Each fellow team will access CADRE’s Web of Science (WoS) and Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG) datasets to achieve their research goals.

Purdue University members of the first class of CADRE Fellows, L to R: Michael Witt, Loran Carleton Parker, and Ann Bessenbacher

The three-member Purdue University team will work on the project, “Utilizing Data Citation for Aggregating, Contextualizing, and Engaging with Research Data in STEM Education Research.” The researchers are:

  • Michael Witt, associate professor of library science, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, Purdue University,
  • Loran Carleton Parker, associate director and senior evaluation and research associate, Evaluation Learning Research Center (ELRC), College of Education, Purdue University, and
  • Ann Bessenbacher, research associate and data scientist (ELRC), STEMEd HUB, Purdue University.

Per the description of their project: “Researchers will characterize citation of data from the literature in the field of STEM education research. A sample of relevant publication venues in the field will be identified from WoS and MAG. Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) of datasets registered with DataCite will be used to query and associate datasets with publications. The team will assess rates of citation for datasets that are cited using DataCite DOIs for each publication venue and analyze a sample of data citations and publications to determine suitability for providing an initial context to help a researcher who is unfamiliar with the data determine whether to use the dataset.”

The other six teams and their CADRE research projects are listed at https://blogs.libraries.indiana.edu/sbd-gateway/2019/07/18/cadre-first-fellows/.

The Fellows will present their research at the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI) 2019 Conference in Rome at either the workshop or tutorial that CADRE is hosting on Sept. 2.

Not only will these fellows show how CADRE helped advance their work, but they will also serve as integral use cases for how the CADRE platform is developed to suit the needs of every type of academic researcher.

Made Possible in Part by IMLS

The Shared BigData Gateway for Research Libraries (SBD-G) is a two-year Institute of Museum and Library Services-funded project to develop, seed, and maintain a cloud-based, extendable cyberinfrastructure for sharing large academic library data resources with a growing community of scholars.

SBD-G will achieve this through its platform, the Collaborative Archive & Data Research Environment (CADRE).

For more information, visit https://blogs.libraries.indiana.edu/sbd-gateway/2018/09/27/hello-world/.

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN — Faculty in Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies are part of a team of academic library faculty who recently were selected to receive a $249,179 award through the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program via the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Along with librarians at the University of Arizona and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty librarians will collaborate on the project with university classroom instructors to develop disciplinary-based, information literacy curricula.

The results of the project, “Academic Librarian Curriculum Developers: Building Capacity to Integrate Information Literacy across the University,” will be shared with academic library professionals, administrators, and information literacy thought leaders across the nation. Project team leaders include: Clarence Maybee, project lead, Purdue; Michael Flierl, co-project lead, Purdue; Maribeth Slebodnik, co-project lead, University of Arizona; and Catherine Fraser Riehle, co-project lead, University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

Preparing graduates to use digital information in their future work and lives requires teaching them to use information in disciplinary and professional learning contexts, the team leaders noted.

Maybee, associate professor and information literacy specialist at Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, explained those involved in the project will apply a learning design model that underscores the role information plays in the learning process. The project will help academic library professionals collaborate with disciplinary instructors to integrate information literacy into courses and assess the outcomes of the resulting coursework.

“I am excited to receive this IMLS grant, as it allows us to expand the work we are doing at Purdue to integrate information literacy into courses to two other large research universities—University of Arizona, and University of Nebraska, Lincoln,” he added.

Dean of Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Beth McNeil noted the award is an endorsement of the innovative information literacy work Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies faculty have been doing with such noteworthy programs as IMPACT (Instruction Matters: Purdue Academic Course Information).

“Our librarian faculty are on the cutting edge of integrating information literacy into 21st-century teaching and learning styles,” McNeil said. “This award will enable our faculty to continue their transformational work and collaborate, and expand it, with librarians and instructional faculty at two other noted research institutions. Results of this important project will enhance current students’ information literacy skills, which they can apply to make better informed decisions and use to tackle tough future challenges in both their professional and personal lives.”

For more information about Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies’ involvement in the grant project, contact Maybee at cmaybee@purdue.edu. Information about the IMLS grant award is available at www.imls.gov/grants/awarded/re-13-19-0021-19.