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Posts tagged ‘Wilmeth Active Learning Center’

Several Purdue University students showed the many reasons why they love Purdue Libraries in the Purdue University Libraries’ fifth “Why I Love Purdue Libraries” video contest. This fall, we added a twist to the contest theme and asked students to produce video entries that show why they love the newly opened Purdue Libraries’ Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), home of the Library of Engineering and Science.

The contest–which was announced in Fall 2017 and is supported by the Purdue Federal Credit Union–was open to Purdue students and received 24 entries for the Fall 2017 competition. All entries were judged by members of the Undergraduate Student Libraries Advisory Council.

Four videos – first, second, and two videos for a third-place tie – were selected as winners of the first $1,000 prize, second $750 prize, and third $500 prize. Five students produced the videos. They include:

  • First Place Cole Griffin, senior, industrial engineering major, and Anna Magner, junior, selling and sales management major: each will receive half of the $1,000;
  • Second PlaceJake Heidecker, sophomore, finance and supply chain management double major: $750; and
  • Third Place Tie Jason Kelly, freshman, engineering major, and Matt Schnelker, senior, computer information technology major; each will receive $500.

The winners of the Fall 2017 Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest joined Dean of Libraries Jim Mullins and Purdue Federal Credit Union (PFCU) Vice President Jeff Love for a special presentation of their awards in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, Library of Engineering and Science. The Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest was supported by Purdue Federal Credit Union. Pictured (L to R): Anna Magner, Cole Griffin, Jeff Love, Jim Mullins, Jake Heidecker, Jason Kelly, and Matt Schnelker.

The winners of the Fall 2017 Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest joined Dean of Libraries Jim Mullins and Purdue Federal Credit Union (PFCU) Vice President Jeff Love for a special presentation of their awards in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, Library of Engineering and Science. The Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC Video Contest was supported by Purdue Federal Credit Union. The winners and Dean Mullins and Vice President Love are pictured standing on the third floor of the WALC, in front of the window overlooking the Mullins Reading Room. Pictured, L to R, are: Anna Magner, Cole Griffin, Jeff Love, Jim Mullins, Jake Heidecker, Jason Kelly, and Matt Schnelker.


View the winning videos on the “Why I Love Purdue Libraries’ WALC” Fall 2017 Video Contest YouTube Playlist at www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfiLH31ZZsO136sTrEir-exeiBi1X30wI


First Place: Cole Griffin and Anna Magner


Second Place: Jake Heidecker


Third Place (Tie): Matt Schnelker


Third Place (Tie): Jason Kelly

10th Archivist of the United States David S. FerrieroThe Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, will share the many information preservation challenges and opportunities faced by the nation in the Inaugural Hiler Theater Lecture sponsored by the Purdue University Libraries.

Ferriero, confirmed as the 10th archivist of the United States in November 2009, will deliver, “Preserving the Past to Inform the Future: The View from the National Archives,” in the Hiler Theater, located in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28. The lecture is open free to the public.

At the entrance to the National Archives building in Washington, D.C., the monumental statues declare: “Study the Past” and “What is Past is Prologue.” According to Ferriero, in 1934, when Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the legislation that created the agency responsible for government records, he had in mind a vision of the power and responsibility of the American people to use those records in the ongoing work of creating a more perfect union.

“At the dedication of his Presidential Library, FDR stated, ‘It seems to me that the dedication of a library is itself an act of faith. To bring together the records of the past and to house them in a building where they will be preserved for the use of men and women in the future, a Nation must believe in three things. It must believe in the past. It must believe in the future. It must, above all, believe in the capacity of its own people so to learn from the past that they can gain in judgment in creating their own future.’ Now, 83 years later, the world is a very different place,” Ferriero noted. “The government has grown, the methods of creation and dissemination of information continue to multiply, the attitudes toward privacy and secrecy shift, citizen expectations for access and participation in their government increase, and the veracity of information available is under attack. This view from Washington will share the challenges and opportunities before us as we strengthen FDR’s original vision of the mission of the National Archives.”

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) preserves, and provides access to, the records of the U.S. Government and has 43 facilities across the country, including 14 Presidential Libraries, containing approximately 13 billion pages of textual records; 42 million photographs; miles and miles of film and video; and an ever-increasing number of electronic records. The Rotunda of the National Archives Building in downtown Washington, D.C., displays the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence.

Before his 2009 confirmation as the 10th U.S. Archivist, Ferriero served as the Andrew W. Mellon Director of the New York Public Libraries and held top library positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Duke University. Ferriero earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English literature from Northeastern University and a master’s degree from the Simmons College of Library and Information Science. He also served as a Navy hospital corpsman in Vietnam.

For more information, contact Teresa Koltzenburg, director of strategic communication, Purdue University Libraries, at (765) 494-0069 or via email at tkoltzen@purdue.edu.

The Wilmeth Active Learning Center houses the Library of Engineering and Science.

The Wilmeth Active Learning Center houses the Library of Engineering and Science. Photo courtesy of Trevor Mahlmann.

Purdue University’s newest building, the Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC) will open to the public Monday, August 7.

Over the summer, Purdue Libraries faculty and staff consolidated the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Engineering; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries to form the Library of Engineering and Science in one location at the heart of campus.

The WALC houses 27 collaborative active-learning classrooms and will be a daily academic destination for approximately 5,000 Purdue students and faculty. (Read more about the background of the facility at www.lib.purdue.edu/walc/.)

The WALC exemplifies Purdue University’s commitment to undergraduate education. The 1924 Heat and Power Plant (HPN), with its iconic smoke stack, stood for nearly 90 years on the site of the WALC. HPN not only provided power and heat to the dynamic university community, but it also served as a laboratory for engineering students. Today, we would refer to that learning experience as “active learning.”

Below are some FAQs about the new facility.

.Q. What does the Library of Engineering and Science offer?

A. The Library of Engineering and Science (LOES) in the WALC holds approximately 30,000 print volumes, emphasizes the focus on provision of digital resources, and consolidates the holdings and services of six formerly separate libraries into one easily accessible location.

The materials selected for the physical collection of the Library of Engineering and Science have been evaluated by Libraries faculty with input from departmental faculty. The books, reference collection, and standards have been identified as high-use, high-demand materials that best support the teaching and learning goals of the curricula within the schools and departments.

LOES also houses Libraries faculty and staff members, who specialize in access to information resources in engineering and science, as well as in instructing students on how to identify, locate, critique, and retrieve scholarly information. In collaboration with their faculty colleagues in the colleges and schools, the Libraries faculty teach specialized courses and/or participate as team faculty members.

Although the focus of LOES is to provide access to information in engineering and science, the use of resources and space is open to all Purdue students and faculty.

The Library of Engineering and Science is located on the second floor of the WALC.

The Library of Engineering and Science is located on the second floor of the WALC.

Q. How are the active-learning classrooms different from what many would consider a “traditional” classroom, with student seating and a lectern for the instructor?

WALC’s design reflects the most contemporary methods for teaching and learning. The 27 active-learning classrooms are designed with flexible, collaborative seating options that offer a range of team-based learning experiences. Library spaces are adjacent to classrooms throughout the WALC.

At the close of regular instructional hours, the entire WALC, including the classrooms, becomes a library, with all spaces providing opportunities for individual and collaborative study. The WALC is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week nearly the entire year, with a few exceptions.*

Q. What else does the Wilmeth Active Learning Center offer for Purdue students and faculty?

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center's Reading Room.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center’s Reading Room.

Reading Room: Since their inception, a traditional element of libraries has been the large reading room. Here, students and faculty can consult materials held by the library, as well as work in a space designed to be conducive to thinking, reflection, and writing. The Reading Room in the WALC serves as a link between the historic role of libraries and the dynamics of an active-learning environment. The view of the iconic Clock Tower, with its bells denoting each hour and at the beginning and end of a class session, serves as a unique reminder that one is truly at Purdue University.

Data Visualization Experience Lab of PurdueData Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP): D-VELoP provides a space where students, staff and faculty can explore different visualization tools designed to turn their data into knowledge. D-VELoP includes a staffed, open-use 16-seat teaching computer lab. The computers are loaded with visualization programs, and each set up includes large and/or multiple monitors enabling the viewing of data at different scales. A 3×3 tile wall of 4k monitors can be used for presentations, class discussions, or exhibits of data visualizations. Technological tools, such as micro-controller kits and GoPro cameras, allow students to experiment without having to purchase their own. Additionally, four Lulzbot TAZ6 3d printers allow students to visualize their data and designs in a tactile, manipulatable format.

Robust workshops and training programs, in coordination with other maker-related units on campus, help students and faculty to become familiar with technologies they can employ in order to carry out their class projects, pursue personal interests, or advance their research programs.

Hiler Theater: Designed to accommodate an audience of 308 people, the Hiler Theater can serve as a venue for such active-learning instructional activities as drama, film, and lectures during the day, as well as special evening programs for the campus and community. The seats are equipped with tablet arms to accommodate note-taking during presentations and lectures.

Artifacts and Audio Tour: The walls of the WALC are rich with reproductions of historic photographs of the Purdue University campus from the Purdue University Libraries’ Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center. Artifacts and photographs from the working 1924 Power and Heating Plant can be found throughout the building. These items memorialize the rich legacy of this central site on the Purdue campus.

A smartphone tour enhances the exhibits in the WALC by providing information and interactive activities designed to make a visitor’s experience an extension of the WALC active-learning philosophy.

An Au Bon Pain Café is located on the main level of the WALC. It is known for serving fresh baked goods, as well as other morning and lunchtime sandwiches.

Additionally, the 164,000-square-foot facility offers 100 ITaP computers,  both open and enclosed group study spaces, large monitors/screens and whiteboards for group collaboration, poster printing and other printing resources, and much more!

Purdue students can work together in groups in the study spaces offered in the Purdue University's new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue students can work together in groups in the study spaces offered in the Purdue University’s new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Q. With the consolidation of libraries, how many libraries are open on the West Lafayette Campus?

A. Below is a list of the libraries on Purdue University’s West Lafayette campus before and after the WALC:

The Purdue Libraries on West Lafayette campus before WALC
The list of Purdue Libraries as of August 2017 (opening of WALC)
Archives and Special Collections Archives and Special Collections
Aviation Technology Aviation Technology
Black Cultural Center Black Cultural Center
Chemistry* Engineering and Science**
Earth, Atmospheric, Planetary Sciences (EAPS)* Hicks Undergraduate
Engineering* Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE)
Hicks Undergraduate Mathematical Sciences
Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Parrish Management and Economics
Life Sciences* Veterinary Medical
Mathematical Sciences
Parrish Management and Economics
Pharmacy, Nursing, Health*
Physics*
Veterinary Medical

* These libraries were combined in the new Library of Engineering and Science** in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Q. What are the libraries’ hours?

A. The hours of each of Purdue University Libraries are listed at www.lib.purdue.edu/hoursList.

*After the Fall 2017 semester begins, the WALC will remain open 24 hours per day (with PUID card swipe), and, as of Sunday, Aug. 20, the Hicks Undergraduate Library will no longer be open 24 hours per day.

***

“To build up the future, you have to know the past.” — Otto Frank

 

“From the Past to the Future” series by Teresa Brown also appears in INSIDe, the Purdue University Libraries’ newsletter for Libraries personnel. As faculty and staff in Purdue University Libraries consolidate six libraries in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center this summer, we’ll feature the history of each of the now closed libraries here weekly.

by Carolyn Laffoon and Teresa Brown

On July 1, 1967, the Department of Geosciences was formed in the School of Science; it was previously a part of the School of EngineeriPurdue Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences Libraryng. The geology library materials were stored in the basement of the Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Building and were a subset of the Civil Engineering Library collection. Marjorie Meyer staffed the library one-quarter time as the library assistant. Dr. Wilton “Bill” Melhorn, the first department head, was instrumental in establishing the Geosciences Library. Dr. Ted V. Jennings, as library committee chair, assisted in selecting library materials to purchase.

In 1970, the department and library moved across the street into the old Pharmacy Building. Located on the first floor of the Geosciences Building, the library had fire exit doors that overlooked the old fountain situated in front of Hovde Hall of Administration. The library originally consisted of the main room with four study tables and 16 seats, as well as a large room to the immediate southwest. Original built-in wooden shelves and several rows of old army-green surplus shelving housed the entire collection. As the collection grew, the library extended into surrounding rooms, adding three additional rooms before moving to the newly constructed location. The library title morphed from “Geosciences” to “Earth and Atmospheric Sciences” when the department changed names in 1986. In 1988 the Library moved, with the department, to the Civil Engineering Building, now named Hampton Hall of Civil Engineering. The name of the library was changed to “Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences” in 2012 when the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences underwent a name change to incorporate a new Planetary Sciences major.

Staff

In 1971, after one year in the Mathematical Sciences Library, Carolyn J. Laffoon took the library assistant position in the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Library (EAS). In 1987, she obtained her Master’s in Library Science from Indiana University, while simultaneously working full-time in the EAS Library. Upon graduation, she was promoted to Professional Librarian of the EAS Library and served in that role until her retirement in 2011.

In 1988, with the move to the new facilities, the university merged the map collection housed in Stewart Center Special Collections with the second campus map collection held by the Department of the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Virginia Carter transferred from Special Collections to the EAS Library Map Room as the library assistant and map curator. She worked there until her retirement in 2000. Rebecca Richardson assumed the position of map curator/library assistant and student supervisor the following year, until she finished her Master’s in Library Science. Scott Bonner succeeded Rebecca in 2001 and was the primary force behind merging the two map collections, so library users could easily find maps for themselves. Hired in 2002, Claire Alexander held the position as the map curator/library assistant until her retirement in 2011. Donna Slone worked in the CFS Library from 2004-2007 and moved to Physics where she spent part of her time in Engineering. She moved to EAPS in 2012 and will move to Hicks Library with the map collection. Terry Wade, hired in 1999 as library assistant in Physics Library, splitting her time between Physics and EAS until 2001, when she became a full-time EAS Library assistant supervising the main collection and student staff members.

Over the course of the existence of the EAS library, several faculty librarians have overseen the library, including:  Richard Funkhouser, 1970-1980; Martha Bailey, 1980-1982; Dennis Parks, 1982-1986; D. Scott Brandt, 1987-1989; Robert “Pat” Allen, 1990-1997; and Michael Fosmire, 1998-2003, when he was appointed Head, Physical Sciences, Engineering and Technology Division, which included EAS. Megan Sapp Nelson, associate professor, assumed supervision of the EAS library in 2011. She will continue as the liaison to the EAPS department after the closure of the departmental library in 2017.

Additionally, in August, 2006, Chris Miller joined the Purdue Libraries as its first GIS Librarian. Nicole Kong was hired in 2012 as GIS Librarian and two Geographic Information Systems Analysts, Yue (Shirley) Li and Bertin Mbongo were added in 2016.

Purdue's Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences Library in early 2017

Purdue’s Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences Library in early 2017

Collection

The collection consists of research materials primarily for geology, atmospheric sciences, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrogeology and environmental ecology. The EAS Library is a U.S. government depository collecting documents and maps dealing with geology and meteorology. An official depository for the U.S. Geological Survey, it has a fairly complete collection of state survey materials. The map room consists of over 204,000 maps and 140,000 aerial photos, including historical aerial photos of Tippecanoe County. Among the most unique item in the collection is 5 volumes containing the very first original aerial photos ever taken anywhere! They happen to be of the Wabash River Valley, c. 1929.  (No other library has this set!) These materials were transferred to Purdue University Libraries’ Archives and Special Collections. They were digitized and plans are to add them to the GIS server.

Historical Changes

The EAS Library has evolved, along with libraries as a whole, from manual to electronic circulation and overdue materials; from card catalogs to online catalogs, from print reference sources to primarily online databases, such as GeoRef and Meteorological and Geoastrophysical Abstracts (MGA) and reference sources, from face-to-face reference to digital reference (i.e. Ask-A-Librarian service) and email reference, from print journals and books to ejournals and ebooks available on desktop personal computers, and from teaching basic bibliographic instruction classes in the library to teaching classes mostly from computer labs to demonstrate database usage, web searching techniques and webpage evaluation. (Searches that used to take weeks, now take minutes, and even seconds!)

First book shelved in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

First book shelved in the Library of Engineering and Science in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue University Libraries Associate Professor and Head of the Health & Life Sciences Division Vicki Killion placed the first book on a shelf in the Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center Monday (May 15) morning.

Purdue University Libraries’ personnel from facilities and faculty and staff from the former separate Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences; Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; Physics; and Engineering libraries are working this week to merge the materials into the consolidated library in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

The new building opens to the public Aug. 7.

More information about about the newly consolidated library and new building is available at blogs.lib.purdue.edu/news/2017/04/27/walc-move-faqs/.

Below are some photos of the first books moved into the Library of Engineering and Science, as well as a few photos of the inside of the building.

 


Vicki Killion, associate professor in Purdue University Libraries, places the first book on the shelf in the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center at Purdue University.

Vicki Killion, associate professor and head of the Health & Life Sciences Division in Purdue University Libraries, places the first book on the shelf in the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center at Purdue University.

Dan Yeoman and Jacinda Laymon from Libraries Facilities move books into the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Dan Yeoman and Jacinda Laymon from Libraries Facilities move books into the new Library of Engineering and Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Victoria Thomas (left) and Sandy Galloway working to organize the books on the shelves in the new Library of Engineering & Science, Purdue University Libraries in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Victoria Thomas (left) and Sandy Galloway working to organize the books on the shelves in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Ralph Mickey (left) and Monica Kirkwood in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. The first books were moved to the newly consolidated library Monday, May 15.

Ralph Mickey (left) and Monica Kirkwood in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center. The first books were moved to the newly consolidated library Monday, May 15.

Purdue University students Lashta Saber and Adam Kunkel organizing the books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Purdue University students Lashta Saber and Adam Kunkel organizing the books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Liz Lukens, JJ Carroll, Adam Kunkel, Lashta Saber, and Victoria Thomas shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Liz Lukens, JJ Carroll, Adam Kunkel, Lashta Saber, and Victoria Thomas shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Sandy Galloway (center, front), Robin Meher, and Lil Conarroe shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Sandy Galloway (center, front), Robin Meher, and Lil Conarroe shelving books in the new Library of Engineering & Science in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

Library of Engineering and Science Information Desk in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center

Library of Engineering and Science Information Desk in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

This mural shows the interior of the boiler house (in the former Power Plant) with students learning alongside of workers under the guidance of faculty. This was, perhaps, an early version of active learning that is continued with the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

This mural shows the interior of the boiler house (in the former Power Plant) with students learning alongside of workers under the guidance of faculty. This was, perhaps, an early version of active learning that is continued with the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from the Library of Engineering and Science's information desk in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from the Library of Engineering and Science’s information desk in the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center. Computer workstations are being installed during the summer of 2017. The building will open to the public Monday, Aug. 7.

The atrium inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (first floor)

The atrium inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (first floor).

The Reading Room in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View from inside the Reading Room in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from one of the large windows inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center's Reading Room.

View of the Purdue University Bell Tower from one of the large windows inside the Wilmeth Active Learning Center’s Reading Room.

The Thomas S. and Harvey D. Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC)

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” — John F. Kennedy

 

Today and this weekend will be one that is bittersweet for many on the Purdue University campus–and especially so for many in Purdue University Libraries.

Many students are wrapping up their final exams and will soon head home for the summer, leaving their college lives behind for a time. Those who are graduating next week are preparing for commencement and are likely looking toward their new lives in the work world or in advanced degree programs.

And, here in Purdue Libraries, today and tomorrow, we are closing the buildings of six of our libraries–to start the process of the move to the new Wilmeth Active Learning Center (photo above).

The newly consolidated Library of Engineering and Science, along with the many active learning resources available in the Wilmeth Center, will officially open to the public Monday, August 7.

Information about the individual libraries that are closing, as well as for Purdue Libraries’ users, is just below.


Today (Friday, May 5), the Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS); Life Sciences; Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences; and Physics libraries will close at 5 p.m; the Engineering Library will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 6.

The libraries that will remain open during the move to the Wilmeth Active Learning Center include:

  • Archives and Special Collections
  • Aviation Technology Library
  • Black Cultural Center
  • Hicks Undergraduate Library
  • Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics
  • Veterinary Medical Library

From May 7-June 11, Purdue Libraries’ users who need materials from the closed libraries can search for and retrieve materials by using the secure Interlibrary (ILL) System or UBorrow. An active Purdue Career ID is required for login. You will be notified when the material you requested is ready for pick up at the ILL Office in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library or is ready for download. For currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars, we deliver the research material you need to your desktop or office quickly and efficiently.

From June 12 through the opening of the WALC (August 7), users will be able to submit requests for the materials located in the closed locations and pick up their materials from an open library of their choosing. After the WALC opens, materials in the closed libraries can still be requested in the Libraries catalog and will be delivered to an open library of their choosing. Office and desktop delivery for currently employed West Lafayette faculty, staff, and visiting scholars will continue.


Here’s to the future, Purdue!

— Teresa Koltzenburg, Director of Strategic Communication