Purdue University Libraries Purdue Logo Purdue Libraries
 Hours  |   My Account  |   Ask a Librarian Get Help Give to the Libraries

‘HSSE’ category

Among the many resource and services Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies (PULSIS) offers student and faculty researchers are more than 600 databases. For years, staff in the Roland G. Parrish Library of Management and Economics have offered the “Database of the Month” feature to help business researchers navigate these rich resources.

To help humanities’ and social sciences’ researchers, on Sept. 26, staff in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library launched a similar series, the HSSE Library “Featured Databases” tutorials. This ongoing series will cover a wide array of disciplines.

According to Library Assistant Ann O’Donnell, the series will post on the fourth Thursday of every month (with the exception of December and May). Each series installment is a new video tutorial that provides a brief introduction to the basic features of one of the PULSIS specialized subscription databases.

The first featured database is ProQuest Research Library, which provides one-stop access to more than 4,000 periodicals.

“ProQuest Research Library is one of the broadest, most inclusive general reference databases ProQuest has to offer,” O’Donnell explained. “Users can search in a highly respected, diversified mix of scholarly journals, trade publications, and magazines that cover more than 150 academic disciplines,” she added.

O’Donnell said the goal of these tutorials is to highlight the various resources available through the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies and to give users additional tools to help them with their research and studies.

“We understand with a collection of more than 600 databases, finding the best resource and understanding how to navigate that resource can be difficult. These tutorials will help patrons with that process,” she noted.

The databases featured every month are selected by faculty in the HSSE Library, but O’Donnell said they are open to suggestions from the faculty in these subject areas.

If you have questions or suggestions for possible databases to feature, contact O’Donnell at hsselib@purdue.edu.

Matt Hannah, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Dr. Matt Hannah

Developing and advancing Purdue University’s Digital Humanities (DH) initiative — an important and growing area in digital scholarship — is among the many duties of Matt Hannah, assistant professor of DH in Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies (PULSIS).

Hannah, who arrived at Purdue in March 2018, has been busily laying the foundation for an ongoing and robust discussion about DH and digital scholarship across campus. He has designed and delivered a wide range of DH workshops, taught digital humanities courses, contributed to digital scholarship projects and efforts on campus and beyond, and has established the DH Studio in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library.


What: Digital Humanities Studio Open House
When: 3-6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14
Where: Stewart Center 153 (inside the HSSE Library)


Dr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Dr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick

To celebrate this growing and vibrant DH initiative, PULSIS will host an open house to launch the DH Studio from 3-6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14. The DH Studio is located in Stewart Center, room 153 (on the first floor of HSSE Library).

The event will feature remarks by Kathleen Fitzpatrick, director of DH and a professor of English at Michigan State University, as well as opening remarks by Dean of Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Beth McNeil and Erla Heyns, head of of the HSSEB (humanities, social sciences, education, and business), div. of PULSIS.

“Kathleen Fitzpatrick has been instrumental in developing the DH center at MSU,” Hannah noted. “We are delighted to have her help us officially launch our own DH Studio, a space dedicated to providing a hub for digital scholarship in the humanities and social sciences at Purdue.”

Prior to joining MSU, Fitzpatrick served as an associate executive director and director of scholarly communication of the Modern Language Association (MLA), where she was managing editor of MLA publications. She has also held an appointment as a visiting research professor of English at New York University and visiting professor of media studies at Coventry University. She is the author of “Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019) and “Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy” (NYU Press, 2011).

ILS 695,"Introducing Digital Humanities" course, Spring 2019, Purdue University.

Dr. Matt Hannah, assistant professor of digital humanities in the Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies, with members of his ILS 695, “Introducing Digital Humanities,” course, Spring 2019, at Purdue University.

Fitzpatrick is the project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 10,000 scholars and practitioners in the humanities. She co-founded the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she led experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing. She serves on the editorial or advisory boards of various publications and projects, including the Open Library of the Humanities, Luminos, the Open Annotation Collaboration, and PressForward. She also currently serves as the chair of the board of directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources.

At 7:30 p.m. (Oct. 14) in the Lawson Computer Science Building, room 1142, Fitzpatrick will deliver the lecture, “Generous Thinking: a Radical Approach to Saving the University,” which is sponsored by the Purdue Dept. of English. Her evening lecture is co-sponsored by the Purdue Dept. of Political Science, the Purdue American Studies Program, Purdue School of Languages and Cultures, as well as the Office of the Provost, the Purdue Teaching Academy, and the American Association of University Professors (AAUP).

For more information, contact Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

Matt Hannah, Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies

Matt Hannah

Purdue Libraries and School of Information Studies Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah has been busily laying the foundation for an ongoing and robust discussion about digital humanities (DH) and to advance digital scholarship overall at Purdue. Since he started at Purdue in March 2018, he has put together and delivered many DH workshops and contributed to many digital scholarship projects and efforts on campus, and is developing a DH Studio in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education (HSSE) Library.

Recently, he also launched the Digital Interest Group at Purdue, which will meet monthly. Group members will discuss key scholarship ideas, projects, and concepts in DH, computational social sciences, Critical Data Studies, science and technology studies, digital history, data science, and more. The first meeting is set for 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11; visit http://bit.ly/dhigpurdue to sign up for the group (location to TBD). According to Hannah (who goes by @TinkeringHuman on Twitter), the group will also tinker with various methodologies and tools, write and share code, and discuss digital projects.

“We imagine this interest group will become a hub for anyone at Purdue interested in digital scholarship broadly conceived,” he noted.

In addition to advancing DH at Purdue, Hannah will advance DH internationally, as he has recently accepted a fellowship as a Fulbright Specialist with a few institutions in Morocco to set up a DH boot camp for digital scholars there.

Below, Hannah shares more about his upcoming fellowship and the DH work he will be doing in Morocco over the next three years.

Q. How did you come to know about this opportunity?

Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Matt Hannah works in the programming language R in his office in the DH Studio located in the HSSE Library. In the spring of 2019, offered a text analysis workshop series using R.

Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at Purdue University Libraries and School of Information Studies Matt Hannah works in the programming language R in his office in the DH Studio located in the HSSE Library. In the spring of 2019, he offered a text analysis workshop series using R.

Hannah: Because of the work we’ve been doing in Digital Humanities at Purdue, I was contacted by Dr. Stacy Holden, an associate professor of history at Purdue, who specializes in the Middle East. She has been working in Morocco for many years, and she’s currently there on a Fulbright fellowship. She articulated an interest in Digital Humanities among faculty and staff she’s collaborated with in Morocco and suggested I apply for a Fulbright Specialist fellowship to organize intensive Digital Humanities workshops to be conducted over several days. I then worked with Dr. Christopher Lukasic to prepare an application, and, for a time, we weren’t sure whether our idea would be successful.

Q. You mentioned you will work with individuals in institutions in Morocco to set up a Digital Humanities boot camp. Tell me more about this project and/or projects. What will they entail?

Hannah: Fulbright Specialists serve shorter terms, generally around a particular project in which an expert in the field may be paired with an overseas institution to collaborate. Through Dr. Holden’s contacts in Morocco, I’ve been in communication with colleagues at Abdelmalek Essaadi University in Tétouan and Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane to arrange week-long intensive Digital Humanities workshops. These workshops will cover the range of possible tools and methods so participants will gain a wide ranging set of skills in DH by the end of the week. In addition, I will coordinate with faculty and staff to consult on existing projects and initiatives.

Q. What do you hope to achieve with your boot camps?

Hannah: I am hoping to develop great relationships with Moroccan digital humanists and develop a strong network of international collaboration around the topic of digital scholarship. In addition, I plan to consult with faculty working on DH projects and lend assistance where I can. Finally, I hope to develop an intensive curriculum that I can teach at other universities around the world. I’m grateful to Fulbright for making such international relationships possible.

Q. What is the timeline for your boot camps over the next three years? Any collaborators you want to recognize, share information about?

Hannah: I’d love to visit other universities in Morocco to conduct similar workshops. Often, Digital Humanities gets discussed as though it were only an Anglo-American phenomenon, when we know scholars around the world are doing dynamic and exciting work. I also hope to develop this boot camp series into an offering I can teach at other international universities and colleges, as well as offer to interested parties at Purdue.

Q. Any other information that will be important to include that isn’t touched on the questions above?

Hannah: One key aspect of the Fulbright role is to gain knowledge from my hosts. I’m very much looking forward to discovering what Digital Humanities looks like in the Moroccan context and, through a process of collaboration, to expand my own scholarly horizons through the sustained conversations made possible by the Fulbright program.


For more information about DH at Purdue, contact Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

Due to some technical difficulties with an electrical project in Stewart Center, the building may experience a power outage Friday, Jan. 25. If this occurs, the outage will impact the Humanities, Social Science, and Humanities (HSSE) Library, and the library will be evacuated and closed until power is restored.

In March, Purdue Libraries will offer a special Tinkering Humanist Workshop series focused on text analysis. Led by Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah and Library Assistant Trevor Burrows, the series will explore how to incorporate such methodologies as sentiment analysis and stylometrics into humanities research using the programming language R. The workshop instructors will also consider some of the practical and theoretical questions particular to these approaches.

The series schedule is listed below. Registration for each workshop is required.

  • Introduction to Text Analysis with R
    1–4 p.m. Tuesday, March 5
    Please note: this session is required to attend the other two sessions.
  • Sentiment Analysis with R
    2–4 p.m., Tuesday, March 19
  • Stylistic Analysis with R
    2–4 p.m., Tuesday, March 26

Register online at https://goo.gl/forms/u6KdezbBE4jgyDpm2. No previous programming experience is necessary, but participants should be comfortable with basic computer operations.

All sessions will be held in D-VELoP (Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue), located in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC 3045).

For more information, contact Assistant Professor Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

Digital Humanities - Purdue University Libraries

Purdue Libraries’ Tinkering Humanist workshops are presented by Matt Hannah, assistant professor of digital humanities in Purdue Libraries and are designed to help instructors and researchers explore and “tinker” with new tools and technologies to use in their scholarship and teaching.

Explore the power of annotation for your research and instruction in a new “Annotating the Humanities” workshop courtesy of the Purdue University Libraries’ Tinkering Humanist Digital Humanities (DH) Workshop Series.

“Annotating the Humanities” is set from 2-4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Data Visualization Experience Lab of Purdue (D-VELoP) in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center, room 3045. Registration is required.

According to Matthew Hannah, assistant professor of digital humanities in Purdue Libraries, the session will cover the challenges of building new digital tools with special guest Hongshan Li, graduate student in the Purdue University Department of Mathematics, who will share a new tool he built to annotate documents.

“These tools are perfect complements for courses because they require students to focus on texts and ‘mark up’ their reading. Hongshan will also share an exclusive first look at his annotation tool designed for classroom application,” Hannah explained. “In this session, we will also discuss the unique challenges of building DH tools.”

Register online at https://bit.ly/2Jja8m6. For more information, contact Assistant Professor Hannah at hannah8@purdue.edu.

 

 

Due to a scheduled power shut down to install new equipment, Stewart Center, which houses the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library, will close at 10:45 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22; Wednesday, Jan. 23; and Thursday, Jan. 24.

All individuals in Stewart Center and the HSSE Library will be required to exit the building at 10:45 p.m. before power to the building is shut off at 11 p.m.

January 22-24 the HSSE Library will re-open at the regularly scheduled time (8 a.m.).

Purdue Libraries Presents "The American Soldier Transcribe-a-Thon" 2018Join Purdue Libraries for “The American Soldier Transcribe-a-Thon,” a Digital Humanities event in commemoration of Veterans Day.

From 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13 in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library (Stewart Center, room 142), individuals are encouraged to come and transcribe original and uncensored commentaries written by soldiers who served during World War II and were asked to reflect on their service.

The transcribed commentaries will be saved and made available digitally to students and scholars around the world, providing an important resource for future research.

“These commentaries provide a wealth of information about the soldiers’ lives, their hopes and anxieties about returning to civilian life, and their thoughts about the Army,” explained Purdue Libraries Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities Matt Hannah.

“The American Soldier Transcribe-a-Thon” at Purdue is sponsored by Purdue Libraries and is open free to the public. No technical expertise required, but participants are asked to bring a laptop computer on which to transcribe. Registration is available at https://go.lib.purdue.edu/events/americansoldier.

The annual event is organized by Virginia Tech, and many individuals and entities across the U.S. participate every year.

Learn more about the project at www.zooniverse.org/projects/tkotwim/the-american-soldier/about/research.

A Look Back Exhibit in Purdue Libraries' HSSE Library, Fall 2018

“A Look Back” in the HSSE Library was designed by Purdue Libraries Professor Judy Nixon, Director of Purdue Libraries Facilities Nanette Andersson, Library Assistant Pat Whalen, and the “A Look Back”-exhibit planning team.

“A Look Back” is a new exhibit in the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library that pays tribute to Purdue University’s first Library in University Hall.

The event “Celebrating the History of Purdue Libraries”–to highlight the display and commemorate Purdue Libraries’ history–is set from 3-4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 in the Periodical Reading Room on the first floor of the HSSE Library. The event is open free to the public.

At 3:30 p.m., Purdue Libraries Professor Judy Nixon will provide a brief background about the exhibit and introduce David Hovde, Professor Emeritus, Purdue University Archives and Special Collections. Hovde will share his work on his book about the history of Purdue Libraries. At 4:15 p.m. attendees can take part in a tour of the 1913 stacks.

The display in HSSE Library was designed by Nixon, Director of Purdue Libraries Facilities Nanette Andersson, Library Assistant Pat Whalen, and the “A Look Back”-exhibit planning team.

“A Look Back” is part of the Purdue University’s Sesquicentennial Celebration, 150 Years of Giant Leaps. Learn more at takegiantleaps.com.

Due to a scheduled power outage, the Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE) Library (including Interlibrary Loan) will close at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15. The HSSE Library will re-open at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16.