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Posts tagged ‘open access’

Open Access Week InternationalPurdue University Libraries has established an Open Access Publishing Fund to support Purdue faculty, students, and staff (on the West Lafayette campus) who wish to publish their research in fully Open Access journals. According to Scholarly Publishing Specialist Nina Collins, individuals may apply for up to $2,000 to offset charges to publish in scholarly peer-reviewed journals.

Collins noted Purdue Libraries is launching the “OA Publishing Fund” pilot project this week to help celebrate the benefits of Open Access for research and scholarship during the 11th annual International Open Access Week (Oct. 22-28).

Information about how to submit an application to request OA publishing support and the link to the online application form are available at www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess/fund.

The Libraries’ Open Access website has also been redesigned and is now live at www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess (the link can also be found directly on the Libraries’ home page). The website includes a map that shows live, real-time downloads—totaling more than 17 million—from Purdue E-Pubs, Purdue University’s Open Access repository for scholarly works.

“Purdue University Libraries has long been a proponent of Open Access,” Collins said. “While we support initiatives that provide discounts on article processing charges, these fees continue to be out of reach for many. This fund seeks to both support research activities at Purdue University, as well as to increase discovery and visibility of Purdue University research outputs.”

For more information, contact Collins at nkcollin@purdue.edu.

Seven individuals from Purdue University are being recognized (Monday, Oct. 22) for their contributions to open access with the Leadership in Open Access Award from Purdue University Libraries and the Office of the Provost.

This week (Oct. 22-28) academic institutions and libraries across the globe are celebrating the benefits of Open Access for research and scholarship during the 11th annual International Open Access Week commemoration.

Purdue Libraries 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award Winner Dean of Purdue Polytechnic Institute Gary Bertoline and Interim Dean of Libraries Rhonda Phillips

Purdue Libraries 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award Winner Dean of Purdue Polytechnic Institute Gary Bertoline (right) and Interim Dean of Purdue Libraries and Dean of the Purdue Honors College Rhonda Phillips

The individuals selected to receive the award this year include: Dean of the Purdue Polytechnic Institute Gary Bertoline; David Huckleberry, coordinator of digital instruction, Purdue Department of Physics and Astronomy; and five continuing lecturers with Purdue Department of Mathematics, including: Owen Davis, Huimei Delgado, David Norris, Patrick Devlin, and Timothy Delworth.

According to Scholarly Publishing Outreach Specialist Nina Collins, the individuals contributed to the following open access projects:

  • Dean Bertoline and Purdue Polytechnic Institute collaborated with Purdue e-Pubs to build a bridge between the content entered into Digital Measures (an online tool faculty use to organize, manage, and report on activities and CV data) and Purdue e-Pubs’ repository content. The new bridge enables faculty using Digital Measures to opt in easily in order to have citations for their publications harvested by Purdue e-Pubs staff. Once harvested, Purdue e-Pubs staff review publisher-sharing policies and work with faculty, providing free, mediated deposits to Purdue e-Pubs, Purdue University’s institutional repository (which provides free, global access to the scholarly outputs of Purdue University).
  • In 2014, Delworth and Delgado participated in a workshop by the Open Textbook Network sponsored by Purdue University Libraries. Delgado, Devlin, Norris, and Davis worked with Huckleberry and ITaP staff to launch LON-CAPA, an open-source learning content management system, to support the adoption of open education resources in mathematics courses. To date, the Purdue Department of Mathematics, in collaboration with ITaP, have provided LON-CAPA courseware for more than 25,000 students, saving these students the burden of purchasing expensive math textbooks.
Purdue Libraries Recognizes 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award Winners

Interim Dean of Purdue Libraries Rhonda Phillips with three of the Purdue Libraries’ 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award winners. Pictured, (L to R): Patrick Devlin, Rhonda Phillips, Dave Huckleberry, and Huimei Delgado. (Not pictured: Owen Davis, David Norris, and Timothy Delworth.)

According to Interim Dean of Libraries Rhonda Phillips, the individuals were selected to receive the recognition this year for leading by example in the Open Access movement at Purdue University.

“These individuals have demonstrated leadership in Open Access to scholarly resources, and they truly exemplify what it means to ‘design equitable foundations for open knowledge,’ the theme of International Open Access Week 2018,” Phillips said. “I am pleased to present the 2018 Leadership in Open Access Award to each of them, in recognition of their outstanding leadership in this area, as well as of their continued commitment to increase visibility of scholarship at Purdue in partnership with Purdue e-Pubs.”

Since 2012, Purdue e-Pubs has more than 17 million downloads from users all over the world, with the average download rate of more than two million downloads per year.

For more information about Open Access at Purdue, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess. Learn more about Purdue e-Pubs at http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/.

Shofar: A 35-Year Retrospective

December 15th, 2017

In 2018, the long respected publication Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies welcomes a new look, a new schedule, and new editors. Purdue University Press reflects upon and celebrates the past 35 successful volumes in preparation for the Association for Jewish Studies annual conference, where the future of Shofar will be unveiled in our exhibit booth.

In recognition of the hard work of so many scholars over more than three decades, the Press has composed a special issue, “Shofar’s 35-Year Retrospective,” which is freely available via open access on Project MUSE through the end of January 2018. After January 31, the special issue may be accessed through your institution’s subscription to Project MUSE.

This special issue includes a 25-year retrospective article written by Shofar Founding Editor Joseph Haberer and published in 2008. It also contains a never-before-published 35-year retrospective article written by Shofar Editor Emeritus Zev Garber. Finally, the issue features the top 10 most downloaded articles from online journal distribution partners Project MUSE and JSTOR.

Purdue University Press will exhibit in booth 130 at the Association for Jewish Studies annual conference December 17-19. Please stop by the booth at any time and meet the new editors of Shofar, Eugene M. Avrutin and Ranen Omer-Sherman, during the Monday morning coffee break hosted by the Press. If you’re unable to attend but would like to learn more about Shofar, visit www.shofarjournal.com or contact shofar@purdue.edu.

Suresh V. Garimella, Executive Vice President for Research and Partnerships and the R. Eugene and Susie E. Goodson Distinguished Professor in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University, was honored with the 2017 Leadership in Open Access Award from Purdue University Libraries and the Office of the Provost Monday, Oct. 23.

This week (Oct. 23-29) academic institutions and libraries across the globe are celebrating the benefits of Open Access for research and scholarship during the 10th annual International Open Access Week commemoration.

Purdue University’s Suresh V. Garimella (seated in the photo), Executive Vice President for Research and Partnerships and the Goodson Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering, was honored with the Leadership in Open Access Award for 2017 from the Office of the Provost and Purdue Libraries. Pictured, L to R: Jay T. Akridge, interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Diversity; Garimella; James L. Mullins, Dean of Libraries and Esther Ellis Norton Professor; and Nina Collins, Scholarly Publishing Specialist, Purdue Scholarly Publishing Division.

According to Dean of University Libraries James L. Mullins, Garimella was selected to receive the recognition this year for leading by example in the Open Access movement at Purdue University. Garimella has more than 400 works posted in the Purdue e-Pubs repository, which have been downloaded close to 256,500 times.

“Dr. Garimella has demonstrated leadership in Open Access to Scholarly Publications by depositing his numerous papers and articles, consistent with copyright and contractual agreements, into Purdue e-Pubs. Therefore, we present the 2017 Leadership in Open Access Award to him in recognition of his outstanding leadership and continued partnership with Purdue e-Pubs to increase visibility of scholarship at Purdue,” Mullins noted.

“It is a great honor to be recognized for our research group’s commitment to Open Access. I am deeply thankful to the scores of students in my group who, over the years, have contributed to the impactful publications that have been eagerly downloaded through the University’s excellent Purdue e-Pubs portal,” Garimella said.

Since 2012, Purdue e-Pubs has close to 15,153,000 downloads from users all over the world, with the average download rate of 2,256,893 per year.

“Dr. Garimella embodies the spirit of the land-grant institution through his work to make scholarly research widely available,” said Jay Akridge, interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Diversity. “I congratulate him and all of the students in his group who contribute to global learning by broadening the reach of scholarship.”

For more information about Open Access at Purdue, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess. Learn more about Purdue e-Pubs at http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/.

Open Access Week InternationalThis week is International Open Access Week, and Purdue University Libraries is joining libraries and other learning and educational institutions and organizations across the globe to celebrate the benefits of “opening up access to research and scholarship.”

As part of the Open Access Week celebration, Purdue Libraries is hosting Brian Hole, CEO of Ubiquity Press, who will give a talk on open access starting at 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 26 in the Wilmeth Active Learning Center (WALC), room 3121. The presentation is open free to the public.

In addition, Purdue Libraries will announce the 2017 Purdue University winner of the Leadership in Open Access Award later this week.

Open Access History

This year marks the 10th year Open Access Week as been officially celebrated, according to Heather Joseph, executive director of SPARC, the organization responsible for creating Open Access Week to broaden support for Open Access to scholarly research.

“Since Open Access Week first began, we’ve made significant progress in building global awareness of the benefits of opening up access to research and scholarship. Around the world, institutions and individuals are increasingly embracing the use of ‘Open’ as an enabling strategy,” said Joseph. “Whether your mission is to tackle critical problems like climate change or ending poverty or to capitalize on the enormous opportunities that having the world’s knowledge at your fingertips presents, Open Access practices and policies can help you speed up progress towards achieving your goals—and that’sOpen Access @ Purdue University a very powerful, very appealing prospect.”

Open Access @ Purdue

To provide a bit of background about Open Access at Purdue University, Scholarly Publishing Specialist Nina Collins, who works in the Purdue Scholarly Publishing Division (part of the Purdue University Libraries), answered a few questions about the Open Access services and scholarly publishing resources offered.

Q. What is Open Access and why is it important to recognize?

Collins: According to the Budapest Open Access Initiative, Open Access is the “free, immediate, online availability of those works that scholars give freely to the world without expectation of payment.” It is an alternate business model for scholarly publishing, allowing free access to the end user. Traditional scholarly publishing business models can contribute to information access inequality—where only affluent research institutions or countries can afford scholarly literature. Open Access breaks down this barrier, allowing access to anyone. Open Access can increase the pace of research and innovation by removing paywalls that limit access to the most recent scientific literature.

Q. What are the Open Access services and resources that Purdue Libraries’ Scholarly Communication offers?

Collins: Purdue Libraries’ Scholarly Communication involves several departments within the Libraries, and personnel in Research Data @ Purdue University Libraries are available to assist with data management planning, data curation, and publishing datasets. In addition, Purdue University Libraries is the home of the University Copyright Office, and staff there are available to assist with copyright, helping make sense of copyright transfer agreements. Purdue Scholarly Publishing Division staff members are also available to assist with most scholarly communication questions.

Purdue University Libraries support Open Access by offering services such as PURR (Purdue University Research Repository), and Purdue e-Pubs, Purdue’s institutional repository.

Purdue e-Pubs staff members work with individuals and departments across campus to provide “open” copies of articles that have been published by Purdue faculty and researchers. We also engage in campus-wide outreach, giving presentations on various topics relevant to scholarly communication.

The Purdue Scholarly Publishing Division offers a free mediated CV review service to Purdue faculty and researchers. Our staff will review sharing policies of the journals in which staff have published their research; and, for those that permit sharing, we will upload the articles on behalf of the staff members—with their written permission, of course. We will review copyright transfer agreements upon request, and we seek to find ways to make Purdue research freely available.

Q. What is your role in regard to Open Access resources at Purdue?

Collins: Within the Scholarly Publishing Division, I am the go-to person for scholarly communication and Open Access concerns. I manage Purdue e-Pubs, engage in outreach, and collaborate across departments to help researchers find the right service for each scholarly communication concern.

Purdue University Libraries, which is an institutional member of SPARC, supports many Open Access initiatives including DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals), HathiTrust, the Open Textbook Network, and SCOAP3.

We are institutional members of BioMed Central—qualifying all researchers at Purdue a 15 percent discount on article processing charges for BioMed Central journals. We are also institutional members of MDPI, qualifying all researchers at Purdue a 10 percent discount on article processing charges for publishing in MDPI journals.

Purdue University Press and Scholarly Publishing Division publishes several completely Open Access journals, and we are proud to have publications selected for “unlatching” by Knowledge Unlatched.


For more information, visit www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess or contact Collins at nkcollin@purdue.edu.

The newest issue of the Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research, Volume 7 (2017), debuts this week online and in print. This volume, like all previous volumes, is available online and open access. Below is a first-person account of an experience with undergraduate research and the subsequent publication process via JPUR with the student featured on the cover, Jack VanSchaik, who investigates spatial soundscape ecology on page 65 of the volume. The open access version of his article may be found here.

 

What is undergraduate research? I first heard about it at a Purdue summer biology camp during high school. Immediately, I knew it was something I wanted to pursue in college. After being accepted to Purdue, I was determined to participate in research my freshman year. However, it proved more difficult than I imagined, and at first, I was rejected due to lack of experience. Then it was hard to find a project that was compatible with my interests and coursework.

However, halfway through my freshman year I received a call from Dr. Mark Ward of the Statistics Department encouraging me to apply to his Sophomore Statistics Living Learning Community (LLC). I did and was accepted into what turned out to be a vital experience of my undergraduate career. Dr. Ward collaborated with professors from a variety fields and disciplines to create undergraduate-friendly research opportunities for LLC students. One professor’s project fascinated me. It was Dr. Bryan Pijanowski and his idea of soundscape ecology. Dr. Pijanowski introduced me to his lab, the Center for Global Soundscapes, where I found my undergraduate research project! I applied my newfound knowledge of big data from my LLC courses to my areas of interest: sound and the environment. I spent a year and a summer at Purdue completing my research project. This experience opened up doors for me to be involved in other projects at the Center, working on statistics, education, and community outreach. I ended up staying after my sophomore year at LLC to continue work on other projects.

When my research neared completion, I submitted it to the Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research (JPUR). I was extremely excited when my project was selected for a full article! It was reassuring to know that after so many hours, my research was worth publishing. However, there was still a lot of work to do. I had to format, edit, and finalize my article. Working with JPUR gave me the opportunity to experience something I had only heard about from Dr. Pijanowski, Dr. Ward, and so many graduate students—paper writing. Participating in the writing and publishing process gave me a glimpse into academic research and ultimately helped me decide to attend graduate school.

Not only did working with JPUR help me decide my future path, but there are several benefits to being published as an undergrad. Graduate schools notice an applicant’s research experience, and it demonstrates his or her capacity to produce publishable work. Similarly, it demonstrates to a company an applicant’s ability to see a substantial project through to its end. Moreover, getting one’s work published also can be a personal milestone. However, I think the most important benefit for publishing one’s research is for the science itself. Every piece of new knowledge, regardless of the field, academic standing, flashiness (the list goes on…), is important. Science is constantly driven forward by humanity’s pursuit of knowledge. Every pursuit of knowledge pushes science forward. When that pursuit stops, science stops, and that cannot happen!

The book, “More Than a Memory: Exploring Purdue University’s History Through Objects," was printed in Spring 2017 and was recognized with a Purdue Honors College-sponsored book launch event in late April.

The book, “More Than a Memory: Exploring Purdue University’s History Through Objects,” was printed in Spring 2017 and was recognized with a Purdue Honors College-sponsored book launch event in late April.

The research paper is a fact of life in college. If you have completed a college-level class, it’s almost guaranteed you have received a syllabus that instructed you to format a paper according to a particular academic style and directed you to turn in a double-digit-page composition citing at least three-to-five (or more) sources. While many college students get hung up on the number of pages required, it’s likely there are just as many who lament how many sources—and about their type: primary or secondary—they will have to read and consult to meet the minimum source-number requirements for the assignment.

But for students in the Spring 2016 Purdue University Honors College course “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Writing” 199 (section 03), co-taught by Kristina Bross, associate professor in the English dept., and Neal Harmeyer, an archivist in Purdue Archives and Special Collections (ASC), the oft-dreaded assignment resulted in getting their work published by the Purdue University Press—an unexpected perk for the inevitable undergrad research paper assignment. According to Harmeyer, the book, “More Than a Memory: Exploring Purdue University’s History Through Objects” (which is also available as an e-book via e-Pubs, Purdue Libraries’ open access repository) was printed this spring and was recognized with a Purdue Honors College-sponsored book launch event in late April.

In the 2016 course, the students, through honing their writing, sought to understand the history of Purdue University and to recover the student experience at the turn of the 20th century. Harmeyer added the course also provided students with a way to learn about primary-source research and gain hands-on experience working with the collections and artifacts stored in the ASC.


Students in the Spring 2016 Purdue University Honors College course “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Writing” 199 (section 03), co-taught by Kristina Bross, associate professor in the English dept., and Neal Harmeyer, an archivist in the Purdue Archives and Special Collections, a division of Purdue University Libraries.

Students in the Spring 2016 Purdue University Honors College course “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Writing” 199 (section 03), co-taught by Kristina Bross (far right, seated), associate professor in the English dept., and Neal Harmeyer (left, next to Bross in foreground of photo), an archivist in the Purdue Archives and Special Collections, a division of Purdue University Libraries.


Neal Harmeyer, Purdue Archives and Special Collections

Neal Harmeyer, Purdue Archives and Special Collections

“Over the course of the semester, we asked the students to go through the collections, pick an object—a photo, a personal memento of some sort, or a document, perhaps—and then ask and answer three questions: 1. What is in front of you? 2. What do you think about what you’re seeing? and 3. What could this mean? We used this approach as a scaffolded step of deliberation and archival research methodology to help inform their writing,” Harmeyer explained. “From the class, 10 of the 13 students agreed to have their works published. The book, ‘More Than a Memory,’ provides a snapshot of the sources they found and the final outcomes of their individual research.”

Each student who agreed to have their work published received a few copies of the book to keep and to share. Their individual compositions included the image (a scan or photo) of the object they each chose, a little bit of background about themselves, and about 900 words or so about their research, their insights, and the object itself.

Extending Student Writing and Research

According to Bross, when she was first approached about teaching the class, she knew she wanted to have students research issues/topics that would matter to them, that would feel “real.”

“Having students dive into special collections is a sure way to give them that experience,” Bross said. “I’ve asked students to do archival searches for years, so I know they respond well to such assignments, and I think it’s especially important for students to know something about the history of Purdue,” she added.

Kristina Bross, associate professor of English at Purdue University and director of the Purdue College of Liberal Arts Honors program.

Kristina Bross, associate professor of English at Purdue University and director of the Purdue College of Liberal Arts Honors program.

The collaboration between Bross and Harmeyer that went into the spring 2016 course “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Writing” 199 and the book, “More Than a Memory,” was not the first time they worked together to instruct students in this particular Honors course. In 2013, they co-taught the course with the same title, and through their students’ research, they published “Little Else Than a Memory: Purdue Students Search for the Class of 1904,” also printed by Purdue University Press.

“I had been somewhat involved in the course in 2013, but when one of our archivists took a position at another institution about halfway through the semester, I took over her role as co-instructor,” Harmeyer said. “While students in that class implemented a similar project, for the 2016 version of the course, Professor Bross and I planned to focus more on teaching students about archival research and primary-source research. One of our objectives was to get them more accustomed and familiar with the various research avenues they may need to undertake, for whatever their disciplines were, as we had majors enrolled from across the various disciplines in the 2016 version,” he added.

Bross noted the ASC provided a fruitful learning laboratory to accomplish the goals of the course.

For Purdue University students who were enrolled in the Spring 2016 Purdue University Honors College course “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Writing” 199, he oft-dreaded research paper assignment resulted in getting their work published by the Purdue University Press—an unexpected perk.

For Purdue University students who were enrolled in the Spring 2016 Purdue University Honors College course “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Writing” 199, he oft-dreaded research paper assignment resulted in getting their work published by the Purdue University Press—an unexpected perk.

“The Purdue Libraries’ Archives and Special Collections Division is ideal for undergraduate research, not only because it’s local, but also because its faculty and staff are so knowledgeable about Purdue’s history and our collections. In addition, they know how to introduce archival research to undergrads and help them understand the stakes involved in the work they are doing. Having a co-teacher from the ASC makes this course possible—and Neal is simply terrific in that role,” Bross said.

“The interdisciplinary part of the course title is represented by the Archives and the primary sources, and the writing part is Professor Bross helping the students hone their writing,” Harmeyer added. “Over the course, she assigned the students primary sources, dating back centuries, such as diaries and first-person accounts, along with secondary source materials, and she asked them to write about and respond to those. So the two things met in the middle—our idea was they would learn about writing along the way, they would learn about research along the way, and at the end, they would have a research paper.”

As part of the research and writing process, the students also contributed to a blog (see http://ascblogs.lib.purdue.edu/spring2016-honors19903/), “a site devoted to the sharing of undergraduate archival research and scholarship.” The blog was a fundamental component of the course; during the semester, the students composed three responses to their findings, which in turn were posted on the site, Harmeyer said.

“This blog allowed us to see their work in progress. Through it, too—because we encouraged comments on the site—they were able to communicate with one another and experience feedback from the larger community, as well. This site also enabled students to get their research out and think more critically as they were writing,” Harmeyer explained.

“The blog posts were just as—perhaps more important than—their final publications,” Bross added. “Neal was absolutely central to making the website excellent. It was interesting asking them to write about their individual processes, as well as to represent their findings. If we get the chance to teach this class or another like it, I want to think some more about the best way to use in-process digital media to publish their work.”

According to Harmeyer, ASC personnel are committed to keeping the blog site available for future research purposes.

“Not only do the final essays showcase the students’ work, but the research they compiled and shared on in their papers and through their blog posts, also serve as secondary sources. Later, students may be able to build and use their research.”

Harmeyer noted he thinks the course will be offered again, with the Purdue Archives and Special Collections again serving as a laboratory for Purdue students who enroll in it.

“For many of them, it was only their second semester in college, and I could see the light-bulb moments expressed in their faces and in their words: ‘Wow, this is hard… but interesting.’ Overall, I think most of them had that feeling and were extremely rewarded by it.”

Download the full text of “More Than a Memory” at http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/sps_ebooks/9/

Open Access Week is a global celebration to raise awareness of open access in scholarship and research. OA Week is an invaluable chance to connect the global momentum toward open sharingopen_access_logo_plos_white-svg with the advancement of policy changes on the local level. Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

In celebration of Open Access Week, Purdue University Libraries Scholarly Publishing Division, incorporating Purdue University Press and Scholarly Publishing Services, will share throughout the week on social media ways in which we support research and engage with the scholarly community through open access. Our open access resources are made available on Purdue e-Pubs, the open access text repository and publishing platform supported by the Purdue University Libraries. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, or globally via #OAWeek.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Purdue e-Pubs, one of the three institutional repositories as part of Purdue University Libraries, has reached another significant milestone, hitting 5 million downloads this past month. 

A key collection piece downloaded as part of this milestone is the Birck and NCN publication series, one of the most popular and highly utilized collections housed in Purdue e-Pubs, which has seen more than 281,000 downloads to date. The 5-millionth download was an article from the Birck and NCN publications series, “Conductance Asymmetry of Graphene p-n Junction,” by Tony Low, Seokmin Hong, Joerg Appenzeller, Supriyo Datta, and Mark S. Lundstrom.

As part of Open Access Week, Oct. 21-27, the Mark Lundstrom, Don and Carol Scifres Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and founding director of the Network for Computational Nanotechnology, will be awarded the Open Access Research Award on Oct. 25 for his leadership in creating NanoHUB, a radical departure from traditional forms of scholarly communication in nanotechnology with a strongly open access character. Lundstrom also is a co-author on the 5-millionth article download.

For faculty wishing to make their work available through Purdue e-Pubs and start receiving monthly download counts, visit: http://www.lib.purdue.edu/openaccess/getstarted. For center directors and others interested in more formal publishing options, repository specialist David Scherer, dscherer@purdue.edu, is available for consultations.

About Purdue e-Pubs

Purdue e-Pubs is a service of the Purdue Libraries, providing free global online access to Purdue-affiliated articles, reports, conference proceedings, student scholarship, and more. Purdue e-Pubs also provides online publishing support for original publications.

About the Birck and NCN Publications Series

The Birck and NCN Publications Series contains more than 1,400 publications authored by members of the Birck Nanotechnology Center and the Network for Computational Nanotechnology.  Formed in 2007, the Birck and NCN collection of publications was one of the earliest collections in Purdue e-Pubs and has become one of its most popular collections to date. The collection of publications in Purdue e-Pubs serves a portal into some of the important and fascinating research being conducted at Purdue on nanoscience and nanotechnology from these two centers.

Contact: Dave Scherer, scholarly repository specialist, Purdue e-Pubs, 765-494-8511, dscherer@purdue.edu

WEST LAFAYETTE, IN — In association with Open Access Week – Oct. 21 to 27, 2013, Purdue University Libraries has launched a new, Open Access website with key resources, timely information and University expertise on the issues and topics related to Open Access.  The website is located at: lib.purdue.edu/openaccess

Open Access (OA) describes the online, free-of-charge, public access to the scholarly journal literature (in particular) that has until very recently been only available to the reader through subscriptions or affiliation with an institution that pays subscription fees. By changing the way in which publication is funded, Open Access has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year.

The Open Access at Purdue website provides news and resources about the Open Access movement. Most importantly it also provides easy workflows through which members of the Purdue community can make their work Open Access with assistance from the Libraries.

 Sources:

  • Dave Scherer, scholarly repository specialist, Purdue e-Pubs,  dscherer@purdue.edu, (765) 494-8511
  • Donna Ferullo, director, University Copyright Office, ferullo@purdue.edu, (765) 496-3864

Related website:

  • lib.purdue.edu/openaccess